Can You Get Fat on Too Much Protein?

When you consume protein, you trigger two hormones: insulin and glucagon. These are opposing hormones.

While insulin stops fat burning, glucagon increases fat burning. This is why consuming too much protein does not cause you to put on fat on keto.

So if you are replacing carbs with protein, you are most likely not going to put on more weight.

However, too much protein can…

• Slow down ketosis

• Cause sleepiness

• Cause bloating/constipation

• Lower sleep quality

• Cause indigestion

• Increase kidney or liver damage

Adding in intermittent fasting can help lower these side effects.

Continue reading “Can You Get Fat on Too Much Protein?”

Keto: 15 Reasons Why You Are Not Losing on a Low Carb Keto Plan

Weight loss is not the best indicator of getting healthy. The healthy ketogenic diet plan is based on the principle that you have to get healthy first, and then you lose weight. 

Best Indicators of Health:

 • Energy level 

• No cravings 

• No hunger

Very Important – No Snacks.

15 Reasons Why You Are Not Losing on a Low Carb Keto Plan

Continue reading “Keto: 15 Reasons Why You Are Not Losing on a Low Carb Keto Plan”

How Much Protein Is Too Much Protein In The Ketogenic Diet?

It is a difficult question because you have so many variables.

Age.  If the person is 18 to 21 years old, they’re going to need more protein than someone that’s 30 years old.

Too low stomach acid.  If they don’t have enough acid in the stomach, they will not have the ability to digest the protein.

Stress.  If they’re under massive stress, they are going to eat a little bit more protein.

Continue reading “How Much Protein Is Too Much Protein In The Ketogenic Diet?”

Burn More FAT Calories Without Exercise And Without Eating Less.

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Is it possible? Yes, if you have the right information.

Most people thi­­­nk I need to exercise more and eat less calories because one pound of fat is 3500 calories. If I just take the total calories it takes to run my body for example the average 1,900 calories.  I eat less than that and I burn off extra calories. The problem solved I lose the weight.

People have been advised to do the following:

  1. Do not skip breakfast
  2. Eat regular meals
  3. Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables.
  4. Walk more and get more steps.
  5. Drink more water.
  6. Consume higher fiber foods.
  7. Use a smaller plate
  8. Don’t ban any specific food
  9. Eat everything in moderation

Here’s the big problem:

You have two types of stored fuel: stored sugar as glycogen and stored fat.

The amount of stored sugar an average person has is about 1,700 calories, not a lot.

The person who’s not overweight is carrying about 100,000 calories of fat on their body.

So the real question is how to burn more fat calories. The goal is not to burn off your sugar reserves and then get really, really hungry for carbohydrates and not tapping into the fat.

Eating everything in moderation will only cause you to burn off your sugar but it will not cause you to tap into your fat reserves. If we want to focus on tapping into the fat, we must not treat all the types of calories the same.

Certain calories we can have more, certain ones we can do less and some we can do moderation.  Please see the KETO Food Pyramid below.

Health - Keto Pyramid Snapshot

Eat protein in moderation.

How Much Protein Do You Need In Nutritional Ketosis? To find out please read my Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/11/09/how-much-protein-do-you-need-in-nutritional-ketosis/

For the carbs we need to reduce that because if you want to maximize your fat burning and tap into only fat the way to do that is simply to bring your carbs as close to zero as possible. In the range of 0 to 20 carbs per day is where you going to start seeing some good results.

When you eat more carbs, you reduce your body’s ability to tap into your fat fuel. As you feed your body less and less carbs your metabolism actually speeds up because you actually heal a condition called insulin resistance, which is behind a slow metabolism.

Weight loss from exercise is only about 15%, but 85% is diet.

How do you lose weight without reducing your calories?

For example, you’re consuming 1,950 calories per day, which is 3 meals, so each meal would be about 650 calories, minus snacks.

Start by reducing the frequency of meals. Skip your breakfast but we take those calories and we put them into a lunch and a dinner. With only two meals you will start to lose more weight. Why?Because every time you eat you trigger insulin and that’s what converts into fat so the longer the fast, the less insulin and more weight loss. So you go from 3 meals a day down to 2 meals keep your total calories at 1950.

Then take it to the next level because if you’re doing two meals a day with no snacks and you’re fasting your hunger is going to go way down.

The rule of thumb is you don’t eat unless you are hungry, which means that you’re going to be able to have one meal a day and not have to eat breakfast or lunch giving you a total of about 23 hours of fasting and this is without cutting your calories down. If you kept the same amount of calories as three meals you would lose a lot more weight.

Once you have achieved your natural weight you can go back to two meals a day.

You are actually burning your own fat reserve when you’re fasting. You’re not starvingyou you’re eating or burning your own fat so for you to sit down and have a meal that is 1950 calories, it is difficult to consume that but you could. What most people end up doing is eating less calories not because they’re trying to lose weight just because they’re having a hard time digesting it.

When you’re eating less the need for nutrients goes down because your body is in a recycle mode so you’re recycling more than nutrients. 

This is how you burn more fat calories without eating less and without exercising. You reduce the frequency of eating keep your calories the same but just make sure you’re reducing certain calories but not others go ahead and try this and see for yourself.

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This post has been condensed from Dr. Berg’s post, How to Burn More Calories Without Exercise or Eating Less  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9nqxSn4qrk&list=PLjEkV6FuJCnZSv1Zj7r5PgVtV9j6VpdPz&index=9&t=0s

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

Please let me know you are interested in the Post by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/

Why Low-Carb Diets May Be Ideal for You – Part Two

Low-carb moderate protein diets can help you shed body fat, improve metabolism, boost energy levels, promote longevity, protect brain function, boost mental clarity, improve physical stamina and endurance, and more. – Dr. Jeff Volek

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Jeff Volek, Ph.D., and registered dietitian and professor in the Human Science Department at Ohio State University, has done enormous work in the field of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets, investigating how it affects human health and athletic performance. Volek has published many scientific articles as well as several books, including “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living,” and “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance.”

Part One of this Post covered the following:

  • Low-Carb Diets Can Benefit Athletes and Non-Athletes Alike
  • Is Your Diet Driving Your Metabolism in the Right Direction?
  • Healthy Fat Is a ‘Cleaner’ Burning Fuel
  • And More.

Finding Your Ideal Carb Level

A level of non-fiber carbs that allows you to enter into nutritional ketosis (a metabolic state associated with an increased production of ketones in your liver; it’s the biological reflection of being able to burn fat) is on average about 50 grams per day or less of digestible carbohydrates. However, we all vary how we respond to the same food, so this is not an exact recommendation.

Some people can be in a full fat-burning state with full ketosis at a level of non-fiber carbs that’s higher than 50 grams; maybe 70 or 80 grams. Others, especially if you’re insulin resistant or have type 2 diabetes, may require less than 40 grams or even 30 grams per day.

To find your personal carb limit, it’s important to actually measure your ketones, which can be done either through urine, breath, or blood. This will tell if you’re truly in ketosis, rather than just counting the grams of carbohydrates you consume.

Research has shown that ketosis is a very safe and a therapeutic metabolic state to be in, especially if you’re diabetic or suffering from carb intolerance.

Ketogenic Diet Can Benefit Many Chronic Health Problems

Beyond insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, there are a number of applications for a well-formulated ketogenic diet, including epileptic seizures, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s and cancer.

“There are multiple reasons why many cancers would benefit from a ketogenic diet, not just the decreased glucose availability influx (which many tumors depend on) but also the lower insulin response and less inflammation, as many tumors thrive in a pro-inflammatory environment.

The principal ketone body, beta hydroxybutyrate, is more than just an alternative fuel for the brain.  It acts like a potent signaling molecule that affects gene expression, including upregulating genes that are protective against oxidative stress and enhance the antioxidant status.”

Other benefits include the resistance to sugar and other food cravings, as you’re never that hungry once you’ve made the shift.

How Ketogenic Diet May Promote Longevity and Increased Muscle Mass

More recent research supports being an efficient fat burner may also predispose you to a longer life. The more fat you burn, the slower you’re going to age.

Ketones spare branched-chain amino acids, leaving higher levels of them around, which promotes longevity and increased muscle mass.

The Importance of Eating Moderate Protein

There’s a common misconception that low non-fiber carb diets are high-protein diets. In reality, a ketogenic diet must actually be moderate in protein. Don’t eat more protein than your body actually needs.

On the other hand, if you consume too little protein that may push your body into a wasting state. As a general rule, eat one-half gram of protein per pound of lean body mass per day, which for most sedentary folks is 40 to 70 grams, but this may be higher for athletes and larger individuals. Here is a link to a Post on how much protein you need https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/11/09/how-much-protein-do-you-need-in-nutritional-ketosis/

Volek says. “I am a general proponent of high-quality protein sources. Most animal sources of protein maintain essential amino acids.

Low-Carb Benefits for Athletes

We were taught that in order to perform at a higher level and recover adequately, athletes need to consume high amounts of (non-vegetable) carbs before, during, and after exercise. However, the understanding of how low-carb diets can increase performance is starting to catch on.

You can only store about 2,000 kilocalories of carbs in your body as glycogen.  You will burn through a majority of it if you’re exercising for more than a couple of hours.

That’s when you hit the wall of diminished performance. To avoid that train your body to more burn fat.

Athletes who adopt this strategy can become exceptionally good at burning fat. Even if they’re not eating calories during exercise, lean athletes have at least 20,000 to 30,000 kilocalories on their body in the form of adipose (fat) tissue that they can access during exercise. Other benefits are: speedier recovery rates, improved metabolic health, and a leaner body composition.

Jeff Volek, Ph.D., and registered dietitian and professor in the Human Science Department at Ohio State University, has done enormous work in the field of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets, investigating how it affects human health and athletic performance. Volek has published many scientific articles as well as several books, including “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living,” and “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance.”

Both of these books were co-authored with Dr. Stephen Phinney, a physician who has studied low-carb diets even longer than Volek.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

How Much Protein Do You Need In Nutritional Ketosis?

The body’s protein metabolism is incredibly dynamic, and limitations in either dietary protein or energy intakes from carbohydrate or fat can tip the balance between gain or loss.

When embarking on a well-formulated ketogenic diet and going through the process of keto-adaptation, there are necessary changes in how the body uses its incoming macronutrients to maintain health and function. To achieve this requires enough protein but not too much.

These tips can help you make your low-carb lifestyle sustainable over the long term.

PROTEIN TURNOVER is going on in every cell, tissue, and organ in the body every day. So in order to maintain your health and function, the body needs to be constantly making new proteins. This requires a consistent supply of amino acids and lots of energy, because making new proteins (aka protein synthesis) is a high-energy process.

The amino acids that the body uses for protein synthesis come from two sources. The most obvious is the dietary protein that we eat each day, but this is normally the lesser contributor of amino acids for protein synthesis. The major source is actually recycled amino acids from the breakdown of existing body protein.

In a typical day when dietary protein and energy intakes are adequate to maintain lean body mass (non-fat mass) more than two-thirds of the amino acids entering the bloodstream come from breakdown of existing body protein, while less than one-third come from digestion and absorption of dietary protein.

Most of the body’s physiological functions are performed by our lean tissue. These functions are dependent upon having adequate amino acids so that they can rebuild themselves on an ongoing basis, and anything that impairs this rebuilding process over just a few weeks or a few months results in measurable losses of lean tissue and of a broad range of functions.

FACTORS AFFECTING PROTEIN BALANCE:  In our dreams, most of us would like to be able to rapidly gain lots of muscle and lose lots of body fat.

But in reality, if each morning we wake up with about the same amount of muscle as we had yesterday, we have been able keep protein synthesis and breakdown about in balance, and that’s a good result.When it comes to changes in our protein metabolism, good things happen slowly.

Factors Known To Stimulate Or Facilitate Lean Tissue Gain:

  • Exercise (particularly resistance exercise)
  • Adequate dietary protein including adequate essential amino acids **
  • Adequate dietary energy (but not necessarily carbohydrate)
  • Increased serum insulin (in the presence of adequate amino acids)
  • Branched chain amino acids.
  • Adequate intra-cellular minerals (e.g., potassium, magnesium, phosphorus)
  • Creatine supplements
  • Illegal use of anabolic steroids and growth hormone

** Essential amino acids are usually only a concern with vegan diets. Learn about food sources in this link https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/essential-amino-acids#bottom-line

Most positive changes in lean body mass occur slowly (an average of a quarter pound per day), whereas losses can occur rapidly with injury, illness, or inadequate dietary protein (including starvation/fasting).  In addition, proteins can only be produced when a number of the factors are working together, including amino acid availability and associated minerals specific to that tissue.

Nutritional ketosis and protein balance:  We have known for many decades that lean body mass and physical well-being can be maintained with a ketogenic diet containing a moderate amount of protein. The 1928 Stefansson Bellevue Experiment demonstrated that 2 adult men could eat about 15% of their dietary energy as protein and maintain their weight and function for a year. These finding were supported by short studies completed by Phinney 1983 and Volek 2004.

In our (Virta) experience, people on a ketogenic diet who think they are eating protein in moderation are often well above the recommended amount due to fear of eating fat to satiety. The result is a reduction in blood ketone levels caused by excess dietary protein. Too low protein consumption does not take allow for recovery from illness, calorie restriction, stress, or aging.

MACROS VS. PERCENTAGES:  An individual’s protein intake during a well-formulated ketogenic diet is pretty much independent of daily energy intake. For example, an otherwise healthy person beginning a ketogenic diet eaten to satiety usually starts out under-eating calories relative to daily energy needs, and thus loses weight.

For example, let’s say that a 5’6” woman starts out at 82 kg (180 lbs) and eats 1300 kcal per day (about a 1000 kcal/day deficit). If her target weight is 132 lbs. (60 kg.), her recommended daily protein intake would be 1.5 X 60 kg Reference Weight ** = 90 g/day, totaling 360 kcal.

** Reference Weight is used for calculations and does not represent total/ lean body weight. It is shown in the link below. Virta recommended we ignore the reference weight and use your height and gender to determine protein intake.

The insert, Daily Consumption of Protein-rich Foods in Ounces, indicates the number of ounces based on 1.5 g/kg of protein.

Daily consumption of protein-rich foods in ounces from kg..jpg

Expressed as a ‘macro’ of what’s on her plate, that’s 24% protein. But 6 months later when she weighed 63 kg (140 lbs) and is eating 2000 kcal per day at weight maintenance, that same protein dose (360 kcal out of 2000) represents a protein ‘macro’ of 16%.

The point is that in this situation where her weight is changing, her daily protein intake should be constant; whereas her ‘macros’ change as she transitions from weight loss to weight maintenance. This changing proportion of dietary protein to dietary energy as one proceeds through weight loss to weight maintenance is shown in Intake and Expenditure diagram below.

Please see the inserted chart:  Intake and Expenditure.

Intake and Expenditure. Changing proportion of dietary protein to dietary energy as one proceeds through weight loss to weight maintenance  copy.jpg

It is better to calculate one’s daily protein need in grams of dietary protein or ‘ounces’ of protein-containing food per day (In this example the ounces is 12 or 11 as in the Daily Consumption Of Protein-Rich Foods In Ounces Chart Above.)

A MODERATE PROTEIN KETOGENIC DIET as part of a well-formulated ketogenic diet allows circulating ketones to reach levels of at least 0.5 mM.  (For more information, click the link below.)

Too much dietary protein can drive down ketone production in the liver. Additionally, when consumed to excess, protein can upset gastro-intestinal function and place a stress on the kidneys to remove the additional nitrogen.

MINERAL CONSIDERATIONS:  Among the many factors that affect the body’s ability to build and maintain its lean body mass, maintaining an adequate balance of essential minerals is very important. Without enough of the potassium and magnesium tissues can’t be built up or even properly maintained. And because inadequate sodium intake causes increased potassium wasting by the kidneys, even salt intake can influence the efficiency with which dietary protein can be used.

In this context, it is also important to understand that our choice of dietary protein and how it is prepared can also influence our essential mineral status.  Four ounces of real chicken, fish, or meat typically contains more than twice the potassium and magnesium found in processed luncheon meats containing the same amount of protein.

CONCLUSIONS:

Achieving and maintaining a protein intake appropriate for a well-formulated ketogenic diet takes practice, and often considerable expert coaching. Individual needs and tolerances may vary, but in almost all cases they are found within the range of indicated in the Daily Consumption Of Protein-Rich Foods In Ounces Chart above. There is no reason to be concerned about long-term consumption of protein in the context of a well-formulated ketogenic diet in someone with normal kidney function.

This is a condensed version of the Virta post. Here is the link to that post https://blog.virtahealth.com/ Next select Science & Research for How Much Protein Do You Need In Nutritional Ketosis? By Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD Jeff Volek, PhD, RD, etc. al. on February 21, 2018

To learn more please read the book the Dr. Phinney co-authored with Dr. Volek.    New Atkins for a New You: The Ultimate Diet for Shedding Weight and Feeling Great Paperback – Mar 2 2010

 Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Please consider visiting Lydia’s Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

It will be the same posting that I email, but you can search the Blog using key words. In the Blog I discuss the Ketogenic and GAPS (for gut health) diets, supplements and Super-slow High Resistance Training.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

If you wish to contact me please use this form.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

Dr. Phinney, a leading expert on the Ketogenic diet, explains the Science Behind Ketosis.

I went looking for recent information on nutritional ketosis. What I found was easy to understand videos presented by one of the leading experts on the Ketogenic diet.

Expert Qualifications:Dr. Stephen Phinney is the Chief Medical Officer and Co-Founder of Virta Health, the first clinically-proven treatment to safely and sustainably reverse type 2 diabetes without medications or surgery.

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Dr. Phinney is a physician-scientist with 40 years of experience divided between academic internal medicine and industry. He has studied nutritional biochemistry as well as low carbohydrate research and its benefits for physical performance and insulin sensitivity.

His career has emphasized the interaction between diet and exercise and their effects on obesity, body composition, physical performance, and cellular membrane structure.

His extensive experience in the design of clinical nutrition trials in both academic and industrial settings has led to more than 87 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters on clinical nutrition and biochemistry.

He is the author of four books, including The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living and The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance, two foundational books on low carb nutrition science and nutritional ketosis that he co-authored with Jeff Volek, Ph.D, RD. Dr. Phinney also previously served on the editorial board of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Dr. Phinney received his medical degree from Stanford University, holds a Doctorate in nutritional biochemistry and metabolism from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and completed post-doctoral research at Harvard University.

The Video Series:

Dr. Stephen Phinney put together a three-part video series on ketogenic diets and nutritional ketosis. You’ll learn the nutrition science behind ketosis and what the research shows regarding its safety and benefits (including if and when you should obtain medical supervision), and how to troubleshoot your eating plan to optimize your ketogenic diet.

The videos can be found at: https://blog.virtahealth.com/dr-stephen-phinney-ketosis-ketogenic-diets/  If the Link does not work, please copy and paste it into your address bar.

PART ONE:  Dr. Stephen Phinney on Nutritional Ketosis and Ketogenic Diets

Stephen Phinney, MD, Ph.D, explains the science of nutritional ketosis, a natural metabolic state in which your body is fueled mainly by fats and ketones, instead of carbohydrates (glucose).

Part 1-2.pngThe healthy blood ketosis range is .1 to 3, which is not close to Keto-acidosis range of 10-20 millimolar.

Part 1-3.png

PART TWO:  Dr. Stephen Phinney on the Safety and Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet

Stephen Phinney, MD, Ph.D, explains the benefits of a ketogenic diet and the research on the safety of this dietary approach.

Part 2-1.png

PART THREE:  Dr. Stephen Phinney on Problem Solving a Ketogenic Diet

Are your ketones consistently low? Have a headache? Having trouble figuring out your macros? Stephen Phinney, MD, Ph.D, explains 5 common mistakes people make on a ketogenic diet—and how to fix them.

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This is not a high protein diet.

Protein for the well-formulated Ketogenic diet is in the 15 to 20 per cent range whereas the standard American diet is in the 45 to 55 per cent range.

Part 3-2.png

Typical menu for a man of Dr. Phinney size, lean and 6 foot tall.

Part 3-3.png

Weight loss in Keto-adaption phase vs. maintenance phase.

The Ketogenic recommends a daily intake of 20 to 50 grams of Carbohydrates (high fiber vegetables). This is not a high protein diet. It recommends 15 to 20 per cent of the daily calorie intake should be protein. The best proteins are from free-range animals in the form of eggs, poultry, beef, pork and mercury-free fish.  Health fats like avocado, cold-pressed olive oil and coconut oil, and nuts and seeds are eaten until you are satisfied.

If you are in the Keto-adaption fat loss phase, reduce the fat in your daily intake. In the pie chart above, the purple is your body fat, the green is fat coming from your daily intake. In this phase, the fat that is burned is from your body fat!

To learn more please read the book the Dr. Phinney co-authored with Dr. Volek.

New Atkins for a New You: The Ultimate Diet for Shedding Weight and Feeling Great Paperback – Mar 2 2010

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Please consider visiting Lydia’s Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

It will be the same posting that I email, but you can search the Blog using key words. In the Blog I discuss the Ketogenic and GAPS (for gut health) diets, supplements and Super-slow High Resistance Training.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

If you wish to contact me please fill in this form. Thank you.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

GAPS diet generally is not a Ketogenic diet.

It is my desire to follow the GAPS diet for nutritional healing of the gut and therefore the brain and the rest of the body.  I will also use the macros of the Ketogenic diet to control body fat.

This week I have to reevaluate those macros with the GAPS diet.  Read on to understand why.

Dr. Natasha McBride writes, “in my opinion, what unites all these diets (Ketogenic, MCT, Modified Atkins and Low Glycemic Index Treatment (LGIT) diets) is the low carbohydrate content, in particular the exclusion of heavy starchy complex carbohydrates.

The GAPS diet does the same: all starch and complex carbohydrates are removed.

As we have discussed in this book (Gut and Psychology Syndrome, see Footnote 2), carbohydrates, particularly starch and refined sugars, feed pathogens in the body: in the gut and everywhere else. By severely restricting carbohydrates in the diet the activity of pathogens in the body is also severely restricted. Footnote 3.

Here is the truth: the vast majority of all cells in the body use fats as a source of energy: your heart, your muscles, your inner organs, etc. Whenever fat is used as a source of energy ketone bodies are created.”

GAPS diet generally is not a Ketogenic diet.Every person needs to find the right individual balance between meats and vegetables. If you are predominantly malnourished you need to have more building foods, which are animal foods. If you are predominantly toxic, then you need to eat more vegetables for a while.

I updated my blog as result of Dr. McBride’s message and my own experience. The update is posted here and in this Post dated March 17, 2018.

Protein reduction is the best way to slow aging and chronic diseases.

https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/03/17/protein-reduction-is-the-best-way-to-slow-aging-and-chronic-diseases/

UPDATE: After living at 42 grams of carbs per day for several weeks, I decided to increase my protein intake.

My exercise program is the Super-Slow High-Intensity exercise workout by Dr. McGuff, which builds muscle during the recovery period between workouts. This building of muscle requires protein.

I increased my protein intake from 1 gram to 1.5 grams per lean body mass (from 42 to 70 grams per day). As a result, I feel stronger and I have increased the weights I am lifting at the gym.

I did this based on what I read on page 60 of the book, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living (footnote 4) by Drs. Volek and Phinney, which says, ” generations of power athletes have made the empirical observation that they train and compete better on proportionately hight protein intakes (e.g., 1.5 to 2.5 grams per kg.).

Footnote 1: Source: GAPS book page 82.

Footnote 2: GAPS Book available at Amazon https://www.amazon.ca/Psychology-Syndrome-D-D-D-H-D-Schizophrenia/dp/0954852028?th=1&psc=1&source=googleshopping&locale=en-CA&tag=googcana-20&ref=pd_sl_8uuxbf85qn_e

Footnote 3: Source http://www.gaps.me/faqs.php

Footnote 4:  The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living  https://www.amazon.ca/Art-Science-Low-Carbohydrate-Living/dp/0983490708/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1533320651&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Art+and+Science+of+Low+Carbohydrate+Living

Next week, I will complete the series with Part 3: Getting Touch with the Body’s Wisdom. In it this video she talks about how your body tells you what to eat and when.

Disclaimer: The content of this email is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

If you wish to comment or contact me please use this form using my email address, lpolstra@bell.net. Thank you.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics. Is there any topic that I can research for you? Please let me know. Thank you. 

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

Supplements to Help You Rebuild a New and Healthy You.

Today my focus is on Rebuilding a New and Healthy You

 I have searched for years for quality natural based supplements. Dr. Tennant’s core products contain all the vitamins and minerals I need. I do not have to take any other vitamins or minerals. 

I am not profiting from telling you about these products, it just that I am so impressed with what is in them.

Follow 2HealthyHabits on WordPress.com
Dr. Tennant’s system for successfully helping patients improve their health and wellness is based on the process of rebuilding a new and healthy you and on the fact that the body is constantly replacing itself.

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The body gets well by making new cells that work correctly. Your body grows new retinal elements every two days, new skin in six weeks, a new liver in eight weeks, and new nerve cells in a period of months. As each new cell is built, the body seeks proper building materials from which to construct the cell. If the body cannot find good, healthy materials, it will use whatever is available.

Continue reading “Supplements to Help You Rebuild a New and Healthy You.”