Can the Keto Diet Decrease Your Fitness Performance?

Can the Keto Diet Decrease Your Fitness Performance? No.

Dr. Berg refers to studies that demonstrate the increase in performance for athletes. I was unable to find the link to the studies he referred to.

In this video Dr. Mercola interviews Dr. D’Agostino who tells us how the Ketogenic diet increased the performance of navy deep sea divers. Here is the link, Dr. Mercola and Dr. D’Agostino on Ketogenic Diet https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LDc5TxOcvA

When you run your body on ketones, you get less oxidative stress, meaning that your organs and tissues don’t break down as easily.

Two of the top ultra marathon runners are on keto. One of them, Zach Bitter, took the US record for a 100-mile event, done in 11 hours and 40 minutes.

Continue reading “Can the Keto Diet Decrease Your Fitness Performance?”

Why Low-Carb Diets May Be Ideal for You – Part Two

Low-carb moderate protein diets can help you shed body fat, improve metabolism, boost energy levels, promote longevity, protect brain function, boost mental clarity, improve physical stamina and endurance, and more. – Dr. Jeff Volek

Blog - picture

Jeff Volek, Ph.D., and registered dietitian and professor in the Human Science Department at Ohio State University, has done enormous work in the field of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets, investigating how it affects human health and athletic performance. Volek has published many scientific articles as well as several books, including “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living,” and “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance.”

Part One of this Post covered the following:

  • Low-Carb Diets Can Benefit Athletes and Non-Athletes Alike
  • Is Your Diet Driving Your Metabolism in the Right Direction?
  • Healthy Fat Is a ‘Cleaner’ Burning Fuel
  • And More.

Finding Your Ideal Carb Level

A level of non-fiber carbs that allows you to enter into nutritional ketosis (a metabolic state associated with an increased production of ketones in your liver; it’s the biological reflection of being able to burn fat) is on average about 50 grams per day or less of digestible carbohydrates. However, we all vary how we respond to the same food, so this is not an exact recommendation.

Some people can be in a full fat-burning state with full ketosis at a level of non-fiber carbs that’s higher than 50 grams; maybe 70 or 80 grams. Others, especially if you’re insulin resistant or have type 2 diabetes, may require less than 40 grams or even 30 grams per day.

To find your personal carb limit, it’s important to actually measure your ketones, which can be done either through urine, breath, or blood. This will tell if you’re truly in ketosis, rather than just counting the grams of carbohydrates you consume.

Research has shown that ketosis is a very safe and a therapeutic metabolic state to be in, especially if you’re diabetic or suffering from carb intolerance.

Ketogenic Diet Can Benefit Many Chronic Health Problems

Beyond insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, there are a number of applications for a well-formulated ketogenic diet, including epileptic seizures, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s and cancer.

“There are multiple reasons why many cancers would benefit from a ketogenic diet, not just the decreased glucose availability influx (which many tumors depend on) but also the lower insulin response and less inflammation, as many tumors thrive in a pro-inflammatory environment.

The principal ketone body, beta hydroxybutyrate, is more than just an alternative fuel for the brain.  It acts like a potent signaling molecule that affects gene expression, including upregulating genes that are protective against oxidative stress and enhance the antioxidant status.”

Other benefits include the resistance to sugar and other food cravings, as you’re never that hungry once you’ve made the shift.

How Ketogenic Diet May Promote Longevity and Increased Muscle Mass

More recent research supports being an efficient fat burner may also predispose you to a longer life. The more fat you burn, the slower you’re going to age.

Ketones spare branched-chain amino acids, leaving higher levels of them around, which promotes longevity and increased muscle mass.

The Importance of Eating Moderate Protein

There’s a common misconception that low non-fiber carb diets are high-protein diets. In reality, a ketogenic diet must actually be moderate in protein. Don’t eat more protein than your body actually needs.

On the other hand, if you consume too little protein that may push your body into a wasting state. As a general rule, eat one-half gram of protein per pound of lean body mass per day, which for most sedentary folks is 40 to 70 grams, but this may be higher for athletes and larger individuals. Here is a link to a Post on how much protein you need https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/11/09/how-much-protein-do-you-need-in-nutritional-ketosis/

Volek says. “I am a general proponent of high-quality protein sources. Most animal sources of protein maintain essential amino acids.

Low-Carb Benefits for Athletes

We were taught that in order to perform at a higher level and recover adequately, athletes need to consume high amounts of (non-vegetable) carbs before, during, and after exercise. However, the understanding of how low-carb diets can increase performance is starting to catch on.

You can only store about 2,000 kilocalories of carbs in your body as glycogen.  You will burn through a majority of it if you’re exercising for more than a couple of hours.

That’s when you hit the wall of diminished performance. To avoid that train your body to more burn fat.

Athletes who adopt this strategy can become exceptionally good at burning fat. Even if they’re not eating calories during exercise, lean athletes have at least 20,000 to 30,000 kilocalories on their body in the form of adipose (fat) tissue that they can access during exercise. Other benefits are: speedier recovery rates, improved metabolic health, and a leaner body composition.

Jeff Volek, Ph.D., and registered dietitian and professor in the Human Science Department at Ohio State University, has done enormous work in the field of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets, investigating how it affects human health and athletic performance. Volek has published many scientific articles as well as several books, including “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living,” and “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance.”

Both of these books were co-authored with Dr. Stephen Phinney, a physician who has studied low-carb diets even longer than Volek.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Why Low-Carb Diets May Be Ideal for You – Part One

Low-carb moderate protein diets can help you shed body fat, improve metabolism, boost energy levels, promote longevity, protect brain function, boost mental clarity, improve physical stamina and endurance, and more.

Screen Shot 2019-11-22 at 2.16.02 PM.png

Starting out as a dietician, Volek was taught that low-fat diets were healthy and that saturated fats and cholesterol should be avoided. But in working with diabetics, he kept feeling that something was “off.”

Dr. Volek said in this interview, “In essence, it drove me to want to understand metabolism and nutrition at a much deeper level,” he says.  “The things I was reading, the things I was taught were not really based on a lot of science, and were a lot of half-truths and misinformation, which still persist today,” he notes.

Low-Carb Diets Can Benefit Athletes and Non-Athletes Alike

Dr. Volek decided to do a self-experiment with a very low-carb diet. His experimentation began in the early ’90s and, to his great surprise, his low-carb experiment proved to be anything but harmful. He has spent the last almost two decades conducting research on how humans respond to diets that are very low in carbohydrates.

Is Your Diet Driving Your Metabolism in the Right Direction?

Most Americans are primarily burning glucose as their primary fuel, which actually inhibits their body’s ability to access and burn body fat. Healthy fat burns far more efficiently than carbs.

As noted by Volek, humans evolved to primarily burn fat as fuel — not carbs — and yet that’s not how we’re feeding our bodies.

    “As a result, we’re running into a lot of metabolic problems, because we’re constantly inhibiting our body’s ability to burn fuel that we evolved to burn,” he says.

We have to eat to live. Without generating ATP (in your mitochondria) you cannot survive. The question is how to do that efficiently, without generating harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can destroy your mitochondria and contribute to disease? It’s all about keeping your mitochondria healthy, and low-carb, high-fat diets do that far more effectively than high-carb, low-fat diets.

Healthy Fat Is a ‘Cleaner’ Burning Fuel

When you burn fat, you generate 30 percent less carbon dioxide, suggesting it’s a lot “cleaner” fuel.

“There’s a lot of ‘exhaust’ associated with burning carbs for fuel … free radicals, reactive oxygen species … That contributes to the metabolic problems we’re seeing.”

In essence, the reason why low-carb diets work so well is because it helps you escape this non-fiber, carb-based metabolism that depends on insulin levels to drive blood sugar into cells and use carbs for fuel.

Volek also introduces another term: “carb intolerance” — a metabolic impairment that you suffer from if you’re insulin resistant or prediabetic.

As noted by Volek: “It really makes nosense if you’re carb intolerant to be consuming half your energy from nonfiber carbs, and to be trying to force your body to burn more carbs.”

Healthy Versus Harmful Fats

Healthy dietary fats are natural, unprocessed fat, found in real foods such as seeds, nuts, butter, olives, avocado, or coconut oil.  Processed vegetable oils will make your health worse.

If you’re overweight, teach your body to burn excess fat, and then, once you’ve reached your maintenance weight, the majority of fat your body will be burning is that from dietary sources.

How to Make the Conversion from Burning Sugar to Burning Fat

The key is to restrict non-fiber carbohydrates – sugars and glucose (i.e. anything that converts to sugar: soda, processed grains, pasta, bread and cookies).

And eat fiber carbs such as vegetable carbs that will push your metabolism in the right direction.

Did You Know?

“Your body can burn both carbs and fat, but your body will burn carbs first.

Your body cannot store high levels of carbs. Your body will convert the carbs you eat into fat. That sets the stage for metabolic problems.

But how do you train the body to burn fat; it all starts with removing the availability of carbohydrate because, as long as it’s there, it will inhibit burning of fat.

To shift fuel use over to fat restrict the amount of glucose and starches, and your body naturally shifts over to preferring fat for fuel. It does take some time to adapt to that. Your cells have to shift over their machinery to handle the increased levels of fat and lipid-based fuels. It takes a matter of weeks to get that adaptation.

But once it’s there, they’re fairly robust adaptations that don’t just go away. This is why there is an adaptation period to a low-carb diet. It can be disrupted though if you reintroduce carbs. But a lot of the adaptations do remain.”

Part Two will discuss:

Finding Your Ideal Carb Level

Ketogenic Diet Can Benefit Many Chronic Health Problems

And More.

Jeff Volek, Ph.D., and registered dietitian and professor in the Human Science Department at Ohio State University, has done enormous work in the field of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets, investigating how it affects human health and athletic performance. Volek has published many scientific articles as well as several books, including “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living,” and “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance.” Here is a link to those books https://www.amazon.com/s?k=volek&i=stripbooks-intl-ship&ref=nb_sb_noss_2

Both of these books were co-authored with Dr. Stephen Phinney, a physician who has studied low-carb diets even longer than Volek.

The source of this information is Dr. Mercola’s Post Why Low-Carb Diets May Be Ideal for Most People, Including Athletes https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/01/31/high-fat-low-carb-diet-benefits.aspx

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

 I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

The Art and Science of Low Carb Living: Cardio-Metabolic Benefits and Beyond

Dr. Volek’s most significant line of work has been a series of studies performed over the last 15 years aimed at better understanding what constitutes a well formulated low carbohydrate diet and their impact on obesity, body composition, adaptations to training and overall metabolic health.

Dr. Volek does not just write about his research, he actually uses it. A former athlete and competitive powerlifter, he continues to follow the principles of a diet low in carbohydrate while training regularly for strength and health.

He was co-author, with Dr. Phinney, of the New York Times Best Selling “The New Atkins for a New You” published in March 2010. Available at https://www.amazon.ca/New-Atkins-You-Ultimate-Shedding/dp/1439190275/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539113181&sr=8-1&keywords=The+New+Atkins+for+a+New+You

The following screen prints are from his seminar: ‘The Art and Science of Low Carb Living: Cardio-Metabolic Benefits and Beyond’.

Did you know that the ketone level when you are in Ketosis is not the same as Keto-acidosis?

Blog-1
Blog-2
Blog-3.png

 These print screens are from Dr. Volek’s Keto Adaption I seminar.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSKDsI0i2uM

Blog-4
blog-5.jpg
blog-6

The balance of the seminar is in this link, Jeff Volek – Keto Adaptation II     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29NSBaCr500

I hope this has been helpful as you continue on your journey to improved health.

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

The Science of Fat Loss Part 2

Doug McGuff, MD is co-author with John Little of the book “Body By Science”.  Here is Part 2, last week was Part 1of the 2 part presentation.

In Part 1, Doug McGuff, MD described the actual science underlying how the human body loses body fat, providing a summary of the key points of Chapter 9 of “Body By Science.”  In case you missed it, here is the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MzA-E8zb-Ds 

BODY BY SCIENCE 5 (The Science Of Fat Loss — Part 2)

In Part 2, Doug McGuff, MD, discusses the facts underlying an effective fat loss program and the role of high-intensity strength training in making the process more effective. This is the conclusion of a two-part video based on the content of Chapter 9 of “Body By Science”.

Here is the transcript so you can follow along.

Dr. McGuff: We need to think of this problem (of obesity) as a tub overflowing. One way to approach the problem is to return to a diet that’s more similar to what we would hunt and gather, which is going to be lean meats fibrous vegetables and fruits that don’t have a real high sugar content. What it’s not going to be as any refined carbohydrate that has to be ground up and turned into flour that produces quick and high spikes and blood sugar. So if we refine our diet to be more of a natural one, more like we would experience with hunting and gathering then with this tub overflowing what the diet represents is turning off the faucet.

The other half of the equation that’s missing with that and where exercise becomes gistic (relating to bodily movements) for that is to unplug. The way we do that is by taking the largest glucose reservoir in your body (muscles) and emptying it out of glucose.

So that creates a need for more glucose to be moved into the cell, which creates more insulin receptors on the surface of the muscle cell and makes you more insulin sensitive. When that happens your serum insulin levels drop and it drops into the single digits, which then becomes permissive for fat loss. And then at that level when your serum insulin levels are under control your body auto regulates very well towards being lean, which is its natural state. We have a genotype a genetic code that’s in us that is an active genotype and when you are in the correct hormonal environment it does auto regulate towards leanness. If you look at hunter-gatherer groups around the world they are all very lean. Even traditional Inuit Eskimos who eat a diet of pure fat have a body fat on average of 11%, which is extraordinarily lean.

Where things go awry is if you mess up your insulin sensitivity in your serum insulin levels rise and you’re not likely going to be in a store mode and is going to be very difficult immobilized body fat even at a caloric deficit.

Well, so what gets the glucose out of the muscle. Well when they asked Willie Sutton why he robbed banks he said that’s where the money is. When people ask me why do I advocate high-intensity exercise, I tell them because that’s where the glucose is. When we talked about hormone sensitive lipase, hormone sensitive lipase is not just sensitive to insulin it’s sensitive to epinephrine and norepinephrine or what’s commonly called adrenaline. During high-intensity exercise, fight-or-flight type of exercise, adrenaline is activated and acts on hormone sensitive lipase. But once it does that it triggers what’s called an amplification cascade. What that means is the adrenaline attaches to hormone sensitive lipase, hormone sensitive lipase activates one enzyme, which then goes out and activates a 100 other enzymes. Each of those 100 go out and activate a 100 others. So that one molecule of adrenaline is hatching the hormone sensitive lipase mobilizes hundreds of thousands of molecules of glucose.

The reason this is built into your body is it is a survival mechanism.  An animal is most likely to need its catabolic fight-or-flight response when it is in the middle of an anabolic feeding event you’ll see then you’ll get attacked at the waterhole. You have to be able to turn your metabolism on a dime from an anabolic state to a catabolic state and the way we do that is adrenaline. Once it hits we don’t got to get that glucose out of our liver circulate it around and get it to our muscles so we can run. It’s there on-site ready to go. That’s why we store glucose in our muscles.

We need these opportunities to perform ferociously hard exercise because that is what empties out large amounts of glucose out of our body.In absence of that we’ll have chronically high levels of glucose in our muscle, low insulin sensitivity and high insulin levels.

Insulin will trigger storage of body fat in a particular pattern that we all see. First it goes around your belly button and it spread then it goes to the behind to counterbalance the fat that it’s on the front of your belly so you maintain your center of gravity and then it’s out from there. The problem is, is these fat colonies are toxic.  

They produce a lot of bio chemicals that circulate around that are really bad for you and produce a systemic inflammatory state, coronary heart disease and strokes something that’s long been thought a problem of fat metabolism and cholesterol metabolism is really a downstream effect of this metabolic derangement.

These chronically elevated insulin levels produce fat, which produces systemic inflammation. The walls of all your arteries are chronically inflamed and irritated your body synthesizes cholesterol to patch these areas of inflammation and then these inflamed areas get sealed over and if they crack open. Well, guess what you’re going to have a heart attack.

So the way to affect this is not to watch the fat content in your diet, it’s to watch the carbohydrate content in your diet and perform high-intensity exercise so you can restore your instant sensitivity. So that’s how we cover fat loss in the book and we do discuss diet and other issues.

For more information on the science of exercise please visit: www.bodybyscience.net

My promotion of this book does not result in my making any monies.  If you wish to buy the book, here is the link https://www.amazon.ca/Body-Science-Research-Program-Results/dp/0071597174/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1527881075&sr=1-1&keywords=body+by+science&dpID=51XCAQEx6UL&preST=_SX198_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_&dpSrc=srch

Disclaimer: The content of this email is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available.

If you wish to comment or contact me please use this form using my email address, lpolstra@bell.net. Thank you.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics. Is there any topic that I can research for you? Please let me know. Thank you.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

BODY BY SCIENCE 7 (THE “BIG 5” WORKOUT) for Men

All you need is 15 minutes to complete the Big 5 Workout.

Screen Shot 2018-06-01 at 4.21.01 PM
Body By Science

In this first video, Doug McGuff, MD, explains the central components of the “Big 5” workout from Chapter 4 of the book “Body By Science.” Covered in this brief talk are exercise selection, the importance of force issues in exercise, the importance of intensity, why multiple sets of a given exercise are not necessary and the importance of full recovery in between workouts.

BODY BY SCIENCE 7 (THE “BIG 5” WORKOUT)

Here are videos of the Big 5:

BODY BY SCIENCE (VIDEO 10): The Big 5 Workout (Part 1) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Txsd0rIsPR4

In this installment, Dr. Doug McGuff explains the exercises and principles behind the “Big 5” workout as detailed in the book “Body By Science.”

BODY BY SCIENCE (VIDEO 10): The Big 5 Workout (Part 2)             https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USyj-RgHFl0

Doug McGuff, MD demonstrates the “Big 5” Workout as detailed in the book “Body By Science.” This is Part 2 of a four-part series.

BODY BY SCIENCE VIDEO 10 THE BIG 5 WORKOUT (Part 3)         https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tI4bOiSAaQ

In this third installment of the “Big 5” Workout series Dr. Doug McGuff demonstrates the remaining exercises of the “Big 5” workout as detailed in his book “Body By Science.”

BODY BY SCIENCE (VIDEO 10): The Big 5 Workout (Part 4) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnDRtLyBFdg

In this fourth installment of the “Body By Science” BIG 5 Workout series, Dr. Doug McGuff discusses the metabolic effects of the “Big 5” workout.

Disclaimer: The content of this email is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available.

If you wish to comment or contact me please use this form using my email address, lpolstra@bell.net. Thank you.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics. Is there any topic that I can research for you? Please let me know. Thank you.

 May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

The Science of Fat Loss Part 1

Doug McGuff, MD is co-author with John Little of the book “Body By Science”.  Here is Part 1, next week will be Part 2 of the 2 part presentation.

BODY BY SCIENCE 5 (The Science Of Fat Loss — Part 1) 

In Part 1, Doug McGuff, MD describes the actual science underlying how the human body loses body fat, providing a summary of the key points of Chapter 9 of “Body By Science.”

Here is the transcript so you can follow along.

A good component of the book (BODY BY SCIENCE) is devoted to an area where some of the worst confusion exists and that’s how exercise relates to fat loss, because our whole notions of fat loss are actually turning out to be very flawed.

What we used to think of is a very simple: calories in minus calories out.

It is not that way at all as any female that’s ever crossed the threshold around 35 to 40 can attest to that because the exact same diet and exercise activity that kept them in good shape. Once they cross that threshold suddenly seems not to work.

So, well and what we’re coming to understand is that fat loss is very much a hormonal event, hormonal metabolic episode. Not only is our current thinking about it flawed, we have to think about our exercise and dietary regimen in a way that creates the hormonal environment that’s permissive for fat loss.

The biggest fatal flaw in the way people think about fat loss is the notion that calories in minus calories out, that this calories out component can be significantly affected by exercise, by the notion that I get on this treadmill. I look at it and these calories tick off and after 40 minutes 300 calories are gone and there went that piece of key lime pie. It absolutely does not work that way.

Think about it.  If we were really that metabolically efficient we would starve to death in the process of shopping at Buy Low much less in the process of hunting and gathering. What the treadmill is not showing you is when you plug in your weight it’s asking for your weight because it’s calculating your basal metabolic rate, which tells you how much you would have burned just sitting there and then it’s adding the activity rate to that and giving you this total but it’s not telling you burn 300 calories because of this activity. You may have burned 25 to 50. So it doesn’t really amount to much. And once you understand the hormonal environment that makes fat gain and fact loss happen you can see how it’s not even the right question.

Now, if I took each of you and we dumped you out in the woods and we said hunt and gather and bring back to me over the course of the week everything that you’ve hunted and gathered and we took accounting of everything you brought back to me we would assign percentages to all the different macronutrient groups: protein, fat, carbohydrate. And we would add it all up and what we would find is of what you brought back to me the smallest contribution would come from carbohydrate. Okay, I hear y’all going, oh no he’s going to start on the Atkins thing. No, it is not what we’re talking about.

But you do have to keep this in mind that is the smallest contribution that you would bring back to me from hunting and gathering in any environment.  So we take that fact and we have to realize that the body is going to predicate the signal to store body fat on the macronutrient that is least abundant because if you have the least abundant thing in more than adequate supply then it is safe to store body fat. So what we’ll find is that body fat storage is predicated on the hormone insulin. What insulin does is it takes blood sugar that is circulating in your blood and moves it into the cells of your body. In particular the largest storage reservoir for that glucose is your muscle cells.

So if there’s an abundance of carbohydrate that will get moved into your muscles cells until they’re completely full. Once they’re completely full, the muscle cells will decrease the sensitivity of the insulin receptors on their surface so that no more sugar can be brought into their because it mucks up the metabolic machinery. It is sort of like pouring pancake syrup on the keyboard of your computer.

What happens then is the glucose starts to stack up in your bloodstream, which sends a more powerful signal for insulin to rise up. And insulin’s major signal is nutrient storage and you will start to store body fat. Well, when the time comes for you to mobilize body fat your insulin levels have to drop because the enzyme that moves body fat out of fat cells called hormone sensitive lipase and what hormone sensitive lipase is sensitive to is insulin If your insulin level is too high in your bloodstream even at a calorie deficit you will be physiologically unable to mobilize body fat it will shut it off.

So right now the problem with obesity in our society is really a problem in how we handle sugar and it’s a problem of insulin sensitivity, which needs to be restored back to normal.

Come back next week for

BODY BY SCIENCE 5 (The Science Of Fat Loss — Part 2)

In Part 2, Doug McGuff, MD, discusses the facts underlying an effective fat loss program and the role of high-intensity strength training in making the process more effective. This is the conclusion of a two-part video based on the content of Chapter 9 of “Body By Science”.

Doug McGuff’s Biography

Doug McGuff, MD became interested in exercise at the age of 15 when he first read Arthur Jones’ Nautilus Training Bulletin No. 2. His interest in exercise and biology led him into a career in medicine. In 1989, he graduated from the University of Texas Medical School at San Antonio and went on to train in Emergency Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences at Little Rock where he served as Chief Resident. From there, Dr. McGuff served as Faculty in the Wright State University Emergency Medicine Residency and was a staff Emergency Physician at Wright- Patterson AFB Hospital.

Throughout his career Dr. McGuff maintained his interest in high intensity exercise. Doug realized a lifelong dream when he opened Ultimate Exercise in November, 1997. Over the past 19 years Dr. McGuff and his instructors have continued to explore the limits of exercise through their personal training clients at Ultimate Exercise.

In addition to his work at Ultimate Exercise, Dr. McGuff is an Emergency Physician for the Greenville Health System and is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Greenville. Dr. McGuff lives in Seneca, South Carolina with his wife of 32 years, and their two children, Eric and Madeline.  https://www.ihmc.us/lectures/20160929/

My promotion of this book does not result in my making any monies.  If you wish to buy the book, here is the link https://www.amazon.ca/Body-Science-Research-Program-Results/dp/0071597174/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1527881075&sr=1-1&keywords=body+by+science&dpID=51XCAQEx6UL&preST=_SX198_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_&dpSrc=srch

Disclaimer: The content of this email is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available.

If you wish to comment or contact me please use this form using my email address, lpolstra@sympatico.ca. Thank you.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics. Is there any topic that I can research for you? Please let me know. Thank you.

 May you Live Long Healthy.

Lydia Polstra 

416-428-5285 lpolstra@sympatico.ca

Body By Science: Four Machines for Women.

Here are a few of the McGuff work out videos for women. His wife, Wendy, is demonstrating the 4 machines for women.

BODY BY SCIENCE (VIDEO 11): Wendy McGuff’s Big 4 Workout (Part 1)

In this installment of the “Body By Science” video series, Wendy McGuff demonstrates her “Big 4” workout that she performs once every 14 days. This is the first of two parts.

image.png
BODY BY SCIENCE (VIDEO 11): WENDY McGUFF’S BIG 4 WORKOUT (Part 2) – YouTube 

In Part Two of this two-part series, Wendy McGuff completes the demonstration of her “Big 4” workout that she performs once every 14 days following the principles espoused in the book “Body By Science.” For more information please visit: http://www.bodybyscience.net

image.png

Improvement is measured by weight multiplied bythe time it takes to do the set.Each movement should be at least 10 seconds in and 10 seconds out until muscle failure. Ideally it should take no more than 120 seconds. In his recent interview on Youtube, I learned that the first ONE inch of the movement in or out should take 3 seconds.

ALSO:

To learn more, I suggest these websites, the first one will ease you into the topic.
http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2012/05/25/peak-fitness-on-muscle-gain-failure.aspx

Here are two interviews with Dr. Doug McGuff. He is an ER doctor and an exercise expert bodybuilder withhis own gyms.

Here is a brief overview:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahIKTdJaXPE

Here is the full interview with Dr. Mercola interviewing Dr. McGuff.
http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2012/01/06/dr-doug-mcguff-on-exercise.aspx

Here is the transcript. It helps to follow along if you print out the transcript.

I read Dr. McGuff’s book, Body of Science, it tells you how it works in your body down to the cell level. Here is the link. It is possible read parts of it in this website. https://www.amazon.ca/Body-Science-Research-Program-Results/dp/0071597174

Disclaimer: The content of this email is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available.

If you wish to comment or contact me please use this form using my email address, lpolstra@sympatico.ca. Thank you.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

BODY BY SCIENCE: A research-based program for strength training bodybuilding and complete fitness in 12 minutes a week.

Doug McGuff, MD is co-author with John Little of the book “Body By Science”.

Screen Shot 2018-06-01 at 4.21.01 PM
Body By Science

In this video, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-ufSYBcZa0 Dr. McGuff speaks about common errors we all make with regards to exercise.
This is condensed from the transcript.
Here are some of the common errors we may have made:
1. Quitting an exercise program because of the time commitment involved.
2. Quit an exercise program because you became worn out or injured.
3. You purchased exercise equipment and now it is used to hang clothes.
The premise of the book is: A research-based program for strength training bodybuilding and complete fitness in 12 minutes a week.
Everything put forth in the book is supported by scientific peer-reviewed literature and this wasn’t really possible until 2004.
The second part of the title says strength training, bodybuilding and complete fitness. Those three things are the same thing.
The only way that you can do any of those three things is by performing mechanical work with muscle.
The higher the quality of the mechanical work with muscle the more you can get at your cardiac system, your vascular system, respiratory system and your metabolic subsystems to produce beneficial adaptations.
The last part (of the title) is in 12 minutes a week.
What we try to do in the book is to demonstrate with the scientific literature is that it is actually a requirement for the production of best results.
The book, Body by Science, explains the how and why of high intensity training, balancing enough scientific background to convey key principles and concepts without overwhelming the lay reader, and practical in-the-gym how-to. It is well organized, well researched, and well written, and an enjoyable and informative read.
My promotion of this book does not result in my making any monies. If you wish to buy the book, here is the link https://www.amazon.com/Body-Science-Research-Strength-Training/dp/0071597174
Disclaimer: The content of this email is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

15 Minutes Of Resistance Weight Training Is All The Exercise I Need For The Week To Build Muscle.

15 minutes of resistance weight training is all the exercise I need for the week.  Dr. McGuff says that is all I need to build muscle.

Dr. Doug McGuff is an expert in high-intensity exercise and he’s an emergency room physician. He is also passionate about exercise that can really have such a dramatic ability to influence your health.

I became interested when I heard in an Interview with Dr. Mercola that Dr. McGuff said, “I originally became interested in exercises when I was about 14 years old. I was in a sport called bicycle motocross, which is a type of sprint race done off-road on bicycles. (With resistance training) I went from last-place to untouchable. I made it to the professional level by the time I was 17.”

He went on to say:

  • I always continue to do high-intensity strength training. I followed the works of Arthur Jones*, and Mike Mentzer my whole life.
  • The type of high-intensity interval training that I am advocating is similar to high-intensity interval training, but it’s being done with weight equipment.
Continue reading “15 Minutes Of Resistance Weight Training Is All The Exercise I Need For The Week To Build Muscle.”