Ketogenic Diet Plan Food List Cheat Sheet.

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The ketogenic diet is a low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat diet. It works to shift your body from using sugar as a fuel source to burning fat. When the body burns fat, it releases ketones, which provide an alternative fuel source for your body and helps you shed pounds.

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Daily Ratios:

Please see the screen-print.

  • Low Carbs: Between 20-50 grams (x4 = 80 to 200 calories) or 5%. Plus 5% vegetables =10%
  • Moderate Protein: Between 3-6 ounces (x28 = 85 to 170 grams) (x4 = 80 to 200 calories) or 20%.
  • High Fat – 70% calories.

How many calories should you eat?

For example, at the top of the range, if protein is 20% or 6 oz. of protein or 200 calories per day.

Then fat should be 700 calories (200 calories/20 = 10, then x 70 = 700 calories.)

These ratios are discussed in Dr. Berg’s video, What is the Ketogenic Diet?,https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JATFrKrG9Cc

To count carbs, I use Carb Manager. Please see my blog, CARB MANAGER is the most comprehensive and easiest-to-use net and total carb counter.  https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2020/09/11/carb-manager-is-the-most-comprehensive-and-easiest-to-use-net-and-total-carb-counter-2/

Overwhelmed by which foods are allowed and what provides the best nutrition?

Your Healthy Keto Diet Should Focus on Good Health. Traditional keto plans leave out any information on the nutrients like vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and phytonutrients that your body needs.

Healthy fatsare the basis for the keto diet, and provide most of your daily calories. Healthy fats help you stay feeling full and are essential for the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins like A, D, E, and K. Look for products labelled full fat.

Dr. Berg does not count vegetables in your daily carbs.  Half would be a combination of raw leafy greens and the other half would be steamed cruciferous or cooked vegetables.

Fruits would be limes or lemons and berries. Do not go over your daily carbs.

Quality is very important.  Eggs would be pasture-raised organic, where the chickens are feeding in the grass. Fish should be wild caught. Meats should be grass-fed preferably organic if you can get it.

Bioavailability: Organ meats have a much better quality of active vitamin A and bioavailable iron, other minerals and trace minerals compared to certain vitamins in vegetables.

In vegetables the vitamin A is a pre-vitamin A that has to be converted by your body to vitamin A.

Vegetables are high in other nutrients like folate and vitamin C.

Summary of Acceptable Foods on Healthy Keto:

  1. Fats
  2. Nuts/Seeds
  3. Proteins
  4. Organ Meats
  5. Fish/Sea Food
  6. Veggies – 7 to 10 cups of salad leafy greens
  7. Fruits/Berries
  8. Liquids
  9. Vegan Protein

To see the full list of foods on the Healthy Keto listrequest the PDF through this link https://www.drberg.com/healthy-ketosis-acceptable-food?utm_source=YouTubeCardsAGM

This post has been condensed from: HealthyKetosis – Acceptable Food List https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzs_60vTkpU

Dr. Eric Berg is a chiropractor, who specializes in Healthy Ketosis & Intermittent Fasting. He is the author of The New Body Type Guide and other books published by KB Publishing. He has taught students nutrition as an adjunct professor at Howard University.

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

Please let me know you are interested in the Post by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me please fill in this form with my email address, lpolstra@bell.net and your comment.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/

Top 5 Nutritional Ketosis Mistakes—And How to Fix Them

Having trouble getting your ketones up, dealing with side effects, figuring out your protein intake, and/or finding the right fats?

Nutritional ketosis is a powerful metabolic state in which your body primarily burns fat and ketones rather than glucose for fuel, which occurs when dietary carbohydrate intake is reduced (not eliminated) to below your personal threshold of carbohydrate tolerance. Once ketosis is achieved and maintained, the metabolic benefits are bountiful: safe and effective weight loss, reduced hunger and cravings, decreased inflammation, lower and more stable blood sugar (thus, reversal of Type 2 diabetes), and beyond.

The length of time it takes a person to adapt to nutritional ketosis varies as each person has a unique biochemistry and varying degrees of metabolic damage needing repair. If weeks or even months have passed and you are still struggling, you may be falling prey to one of these common mistakes that can interfere with nutritional ketosis.

The following is condensed from the Virta post Top 5 Nutritional Ketosis Mistakes—And How to Fix Them

Anna Barnwell, MPH, MSW, April 25, 2018https://blog.virtahealth.com/top-keto-mistakes/

Be sure to watch the embedded videos.

Mistake #1: Too much protein, not enough fat

A well-formulated ketogenic diet is moderate, NOT HIGH, in protein. Protein has a moderate insulin-stimulating effect, and it can interfere with ketone production by the liver when consumed in excess.Most healthy individuals require between 1.5 and 1.75 grams of protein per kg of ‘reference body weight’ to maintain lean body mass and function during a ketogenic diet. Intakes above 2.0 g/kg reference weight show no additional benefit. Here’s where you can find your protein needs on a ketogenic diet.

How much protein? Dr. Phinney helps you figure that out in this Post.

https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/11/09/how-much-protein-do-you-need-in-nutritional-ketosis/

Calories from FAT should make up the majority of your dietary intake in order to feel adequately satisfied. Adding fats like olive oil, butter, cream, coconut, or canola oils to meals without being accompanied by extra protein is critical to achieve both satiety and nutritional ketosis.

Blog -1 Fat ratio to protein, fat.png

Mistake #2: Choosing the wrong kinds of fat

When it comes to consuming dietary fat, it’s not only about quantity, but quality, too.

Fat is essential and two of its primary functions in humans are: 1) as a fuel source, particularly when “keto-adapted,” and 2) to build and maintain vital membranes for all the cells in the body.

On a ketogenic diet, monounsaturated and saturated fats should provide the majority of your dietary fat intake to supply the body with energy, as the body prefers to use these types of fats for fuel.

Monounsaturated fats are found in oils such as olive, avocado, and canola, as well as in some animal fats such as lard. Saturated fats are naturally concentrated in most animal fats such as dairy fat, beef (suet), and lamb, as well as “tropical oils” (e.g., coconut and palm oil). Dietary saturated fats are readily burned off to be used for fuel (i.e., they won’t accumulate in your blood) when a person is keto-adapted.

Polyunsaturated fats are not well-tolerated in large amounts. Therefore, vegetable oils should be limited and avoided. Common sources include soybean, corn, sunflower, safflower, cottonseed, and peanut oils.

The two sub-classes of polyunsaturated fats, omega-6 and omega-3, are essential to consume in small amounts for the purposes of membrane health, as our bodies cannot naturally make them. To consume the recommended amount of omega-3 fatty acid, eat 3 servings of cold-water ocean fish per week or take at least 1 gram of fish oil daily (or flaxseed oil if you are vegetarian or vegan). Consuming excess omega-6 fats, however, will lead to stomach and intestinal upset and possibly increase inflammation.

(Lydia buys fish from Vital Choice which are Certified Purity,the wild fish and shellfish are free of hazardous levels of contaminants; see in the revealing mercury chart here https://www.vitalchoice.com/content/purity-story)

Finally, avoid artificial trans fats all together, such as commercial shortening and margarine, as they are strongly linked to coronary artery disease.

The “right” Fats & Oils chart.

Blog - Fats chart.png

Learn more about health fats at https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2019/02/01/the-sad-saga-of-saturated-fat/

Mistake #3: Not enough salt

Current US dietary guidelines recommend 2300 mg of sodium per day. However, recent research published in mainstream journals like the New England Journal of Medicine highlights that consuming 2300 mg or less of sodium daily actually increases mortality in the general healthy adult population; in fact, for optimal health, most of us need anywhere between 4000-5000 mg of sodium per day – and that’s for people consuming standard diets containing appreciable amounts of carbohydrate.

On a ketogenic diet, consuming adequate sodium becomes all the more critical, as the rate of sodium excretion by the kidneys into the urine increases quite significantly while in nutritional ketosis.This means that most people on a ketogenic diet need to consume closer to 5000 mg (i.e., 5 grams) of sodium (which equals 12 grams or 2.5 teaspoons of salt) per day in order to maintain an adequate balance.

Starting in just the first few days of adapting to nutritional ketosis, neglecting to consume 5 grams of sodium can put your circulatory system into disarray and trigger the notorious “keto flu” symptoms: headaches, dizziness, lightheadedness, fatigue and constipation.And here’s an important point:this daily need for 5 grams of sodium continues as long as one remains in nutritional ketosis; it’s not just a temporary need during keto-adaptation.

Fortunately, you can keep these symptoms at bay and improve your overall well-being and function by simply salting your food moderately and consuming 2 servings of broth or bouillon daily. For most people, this results in about 3 grams of sodium from regular food plus 2 grams from broth, totalling 5 grams per day.  Keep in mind that salt and sodium are not the same meaning, 1 teaspoon of salt is the equivalent of 5 grams of salt but contains only 2.3 grams of sodium (the rest is chloride). 

Note: please consult a medical professional if you have high blood pressure or fluid retention due to congestive heart failure or kidney problems to determine the right dietary sodium intake for you.

Mistake #4: Stagnant “macro ratios”

There are three major macronutrients (or “macros”) that supply humans with energy (calories) from foods: carbohydrate, fat, and protein. On a well-formulated ketogenic diet, your daily energy needs should be satisfied by approximately 5-10% carbs, 70-80% fat, and 15-20% protein.

When you initially begin a ketogenic diet and are losing weight, 70-80% of energy will come from burning your own body fat stores from adipose tissue – NOT entirely from dietary sources. As you approach “weight maintenance” the fat needed to supply your daily energy will have to come from your food because you no longer have as much excess fat to lose! The chart below shows food macronutrient intakes plus body fat contributions as one progresses from through the stages of weight loss to eventual weight stability. It is for a 5’6” women going from 180 to 140 lbs.

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You will continue consuming approximately the same, moderate amount of protein in addition to non-starchy vegetables.

You will need to eat more of the “right” types of fats as you approach and then achieve weight maintenance. Please watch the video.

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Dr. Phinney explains macros in his video: What should my macros be on a Ketogenic diet? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NXtRLYntifc

To track grams of carbs, proteins and fat Lydia uses the free version of Carb Manager https://www.carbmanager.com/

Learn more at https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2020/09/11/carb-manager-is-the-most-comprehensive-and-easiest-to-use-net-and-total-carb-counter-2/

Mistake #5: “Needing” to fast

Fasting is being promoted as potent tool for rapid weight loss, enhancing ketone levels and increasing life span. But, much of the research supporting these benefits has been done in mice. Well-done human research on the long-term safety and efficacy of fasting raises important concerns, particularly if one chooses to fast longer than one day. Fasting for more than 2 days can lead to lean tissue loss and even a permanent reduction in reduction resting metabolism (Fothergill, 2016 is cited in the Virta post), among other significant health concerns.

Going in and out of the fasting state while on diabetes or high blood pressure medications can lead to dangerous swings in blood glucose or blood pressure, and this is risky if done without close, expert medical supervision.

In contrast, achieving and maintaining a stable state of nutritional ketosis with real food while avoiding majorly wide swings in your daily caloric intake and medication needs will be safer, more sustainable, and more enjoyable.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

MISLEADING HEADLINE: Low and high-carb diets can both raise risk of early death, new study finds

The headline may grab your attention but it is misleading.

https://www.afr.com/lifestyle/low-and-highcarb-diets-can-both-raise-risk-of-early-death-new-study-finds-20180817-h143ys

The study actually says:

“Low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with protein or fat are gaining widespread popularity as a health and weight loss strategy,” said study leader Dr Sara Seidelmann, from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston.

“However, our data suggests that animal-basedlow carbohydrate diets might be associated with shorter overall lifespan and should be discouraged.  NOTE: It is animal-based, with no vegetables.

“If one chooses to follow a low carbohydrate diet, then exchanging carbohydrates for more plant-based fats and proteins might actually promote healthy ageing in the long term.”

In my opinion, that means consuming plant-based fats such as olive oil, palm and coconut oil, nuts, and avocados and seeds.

The headline may grab your attention but it is misleading.

Disclaimer: The content of this email is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Please consider visiting Lydia’s Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available.

If you wish to comment or contact me please use this form using my email address, lpolstra@bell.net

I welcome your comments and suggestions. 

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

Which Fats Do I Use To Replace Vegetable Oils?

 The best fats are low in Polyunsaturated Fats (blue) and high in either Monounsaturated (yellow) or Saturated Fats (red).
I use coconut oil in my cooking or heating meals. Butter is wonderful in baking. Olive oil is fantastic on salads.
My daily eating plan includes both coconut oil and olive oil.  That way I get both of the healthy fats: Monounsaturated and Saturated fats.

Health - Diet Ketogenic, Fatty Acid in Oils, Dr. Phinney 2016.png

Where did I get the chart? I got it from Dr. Phinney in his presentation:   ‘Recent Developments in LCHF and Nutritional Ketosis’
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8uSv6OgHJE
STEPHEN PHINNEY a physician scientist who has spent 35 years studying diet, exercise, fatty acids, and inflammation.  He has held academic positions at the Universities of Vermont, Minnesota, and California at Davis; and leadership positions at Monsanto, Galileo Laboratories, and Efficas.  He received his MD from Stanford University, PhD in Nutritional Biochemistry from MIT, and did post-doctoral research at Harvard.

He has designed, completed, and published data from more than 20 clinical protocols involving foods, diets, exercise, oxidative stress, and inflammation.  His recent work in the private sector has resulted in several issued and pending patents.  He has authored more than 70 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters on a wide variety of topics, including the effects of diets and specific nutrients on inflammation, the interaction between diet and exercise and their effects on obesity, body composition, physical performance, and cellular membrane structure.

Dr. Phinney’s clinical experience includes 20 years of inpatient and outpatient clinical nutrition, including directing multidisciplinary weight management programs in 3 locations.  As an internationally recognized expert in obesity, carbohydrate-restricted diets, diet and performance, and essential fatty acid metabolism, he has given hundreds of presentations to industry, health care professional, and lay audiences.

In collaboration with Dr. Eric Westman and Dr. Jeff Volek, he co-authored the New York Times Best Selling “The New Atkins for a New You” published in March 2010.

I highly recommend this book.
Please consider changing the fats you consume. Eating the right fuel is a good habit to get in.
If you wish to contact me please email me at lpolstra@bell.net