High Insulin Causes Insulin Resistance.

Metabolic syndrome (Metabolic Syndrome X) is when your cholesterol is too high, you have insulin resistance, you have high blood sugar, high blood pressure, central obesity.

Metabolic syndrome should really be called hyperinsulinemia syndrome.  The conventional view point is that insulin resistance leads to increased insulin. Is that actually true? Is it the insulin resistance that causes high insulin or is it the high insulin that causes insulin resistance?

To figure this out observe what happens after gastric bypass wherethey are bypassing part of the small intestine, which is one part of the body that affects insulin. The other part is the pancreas but there’s something in the small intestine that activates insulin. So when you do gastric bypass you correct part of the high insulin problem, you reduce insulin. They find after this procedure that it reverses type-2 diabetes by 83 %. It also reverses high blood pressure by 63 % as well as reversing high cholesterol by 61 %.

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Diabetes type 2, (high blood sugar), hypertension and cholesterol is Syndrome X. Reducing insulin also improves sleep apnea,polycystic ovarian syndrome, fatty liver, GERD (like acid reflux) and even joint pain. This study that I’m basing this on is this very interesting because they looked at 423 other studies but focused on 58 of the ones that actually measured insulin. The direct finding was if you reduce insulin you produced changes with so many different conditions. Metabolic syndrome (Syndrome X) includes several diseases or shall we say symptoms of this high insulin.

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When you have high insulin over a period of time the body is going to start to resist it, the insulin receptors are going to start to resist that high-level. It is high insulin that causes the insulin resistance. Once you have insulin resistance, the bio-feedback loops will further raise insulin but only if you keepconsuming the things that trigger insulin carbohydrates, frequent eating.

In type 2 diabetes you have insulin resistance and you also have high insulin for a period of time until the cells that make insulin get weaker and weaker and weaker and your blood sugar’s go higher and higher and higher. So you initially have high insulin and it goes lower.

In obesity you have high insulin as well but you could also have diabetes type 2 and not be overweight you can be skinny and still have insulin. Why is this so important? Well if it is true that high insulin leads to insulin resistance that leads to pre-diabetes and then diabetes thenit would be very important to actually measure insulin early on and not only focus on blood sugars. Identifying through a blood test what your insulin is doing would be the best indicator to predict and even prevent insulin resistance as well as pre-diabetes and diabetes.

But unfortunately there are certain doctors are focused primarily on the blood sugars and the bigger problem of that not understanding this concept is to eventually start prescribing insulin to a diabetic type 2.

Think about this, if you have hyperthyroidism, you have too much thyroid hormones would you give that patient more thyroid hormones. Or you have a hyper cortisol problem it’s called Cushing’s would you give that patient high cortisol? Of course not but you would only know if they had high cortisol or high thyroid hormone or high insulin if you tested it unfortunately that’s rarely tested.

In summary, it’s high insulin that occurs way before the pre-diabetes and diabetes. A person will not have high blood sugars for many years but they may have a lot of other problems that will then be treated separately like they do with the lipids and high blood pressure and a lot of these other things.

The things that trigger insulin are primarily the over consumption of carbohydrates and the frequent eating and the snacking that people are involved with to prevent their blood sugars from dropping.

This post has been condensed from Dr. Berg’s Post Metabolic Syndrome Should Really Be Called Hyperinsulinemia Syndrome https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1gB0RTqi-I

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise. 

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

Please let me know you are interested in the Post by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/

Loosing Weight Part Two: Is a Calorie a Calorie?

Do Calories Matter? Is a Calorie a Calorie? (Science of Weight Gain)

This Post is part two of the Transcript. It starts at the 8:38 minute mark.Here is the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcMBm-UVdII

Please see the original for the Footnotes and Citations for the scientific studies.

This brings us to the next point: Is a calorie a calorie?

Blog calorie

For a calorie to be a calorie, we would expect all foods to be processed in similar ways in the body without having unique effects on our hormones or other biochemical processes.

But in the case of alcohol a calorie is clearly not a calorie as it has some interesting peripheral effects due to the fact that 10% of the alcohol you ingest is metabolized in the brain, making you drunk and 80% of it is metabolized in the liver, leading to liver disease and other problems.

Another one is trans-fats, which are very different from other fats. The synthetic nature of trans-fats doesn’t allow them to be broken down in your mitochondria and they contribute to metabolic disease and atherosclerosis.

Proteins, get broken down into amino acids in the body, and the liver will use these for either protein synthesis, i.e. muscle growth or convert them into either glucose or fatty acids.

These processes though depend on your insulin levels, whether you have broken down muscle tissue through exercise and how much glucose is stored in the form of glycogen in your body.

And there are all kinds of amino acids, some that are essential and can only come from the diet and some that are non-essential.

Fats on the other hand get broken down into free fatty acids and they will be processed by your mitochondria for energy or stored in the muscle or stored in your fat tissue.

And there are several different types of fat, some good, some bad. For example you have bad ones like trans fats we just talked about and you have fatty-acids like DHA, which is theorized to be what allowed humans to evolve their big brains.

Glucose, the carbohydrate found in things like rice or starchy vegetables passes into the bloodstream and then stimulates the pancreas to make insulin, allowing it to get into the cell so that it can be burned up for energy or it may be stored as glycogen.

Depending on how much glycogen is already stored in the body and how quickly and how much glucose is entering your system at one time, glucose may be stored as fat through a process called de novo lipogenesis.

Keep in mind that fiber in vegetables is going to slow down the rate at which glucose is processed. So your body will react very differently to say 50g of glucose from white bread and 50g of glucose from broccoli.

Now there’s another carbohydrate called fructose (or “frooooctose”) found in sweet things like fruit, juice, honey or table sugar.

The tricky thing about table sugar, or sucrose, is it’s comprised of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of fructose, yet glucose by itself is sometimes called sugar. For example, blood sugar is synonymous with blood glucose. However what I’m discussing is fructose, a molecule very different and much sweeter than glucose.

Fructose is technically a carbohydrate but it is not necessary for any biochemical reaction in the body, so almost all of it is processed in the liver. The interesting thing about fructose is, among other negative effects like promoting the development of fatty liver disease, is it causes insulin resistance, meaning the more you eat sweet things, the more your pancreas will have to secrete insulin to get its job done, leading to higher and higher insulin levels.

Fructose, by the way, is in 74% of all packaged foods in the form of added sugars.

If you’re trying to lose body fat, you’ll want to keep an eye on insulin. When you have high levels of insulin, hormone sensitive lipase, which breaks down fat for energy, is much less active. In this case, if you haven’t eaten for a couple hours you start to get really hungry because you can’t actually use any of that fat on your body for energy.

So your body fat continues to stick around and you feel pretty crappy. Another reason behind the hunger is that high levels of insulin block your brain from seeing the leptin signal – you become resistant to leptin. Leptin again, is the satiety hormone.

This how eating too many things, like packaged foods or refined carbohydrates, that spike insulin levels can cause people to be hungry and lethargic despite having so much energy stored on their body as fat. So yes Pete is fat because he ate too much clearly, “I’m not fat!” but the reason he ate too much has to do with his hormones.

A calorie is a calorie in the way a gram of money is a gram of money. A kilogram of one hundred dollar bills is going to affect your bank account much differently than a kilogram of 1 yen Japanese coins.

For some people, calories have worked as a decent rule of thumb for them, but tracking the macronutrient composition of your food is going to give you much more insight into how your food is affecting your body than just calories.

There’s still a lot more to be said about macronutrients, but you can notice their effects pretty quickly if you pay attention.

  • Does a breakfast high in fructose and glucose like orange juice and a big bowl of cereal with flavored yogurt leave you feeling hungry and tired by the time you get to work?
  • And does a meal high in good fat, protein and fiber like salmon, eggs and vegetables make you feel any different?

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@sympatico.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

 To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net

Sugar Is Toxic, Addictive And Deadly. What Is The Alternative?

It is Valentine’s Day. What a day for a post on sugar. Let us see what we can learn about sugar.

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Dr. Robert Lustig, a professor of Clinical Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology in the University of California and a pioneer in decoding sugar metabolism, says that your body can safely metabolize at least six teaspoons (28.6 grams) of added sugar from natural and manufactured sources per day. It seems like a lot, but did you know that a 3” apple has 18.9 grams of sugar.

The average American consumes about 32 teaspoons of sugar per day. Sugar is in most processed foods and drinks. It is in your coffee or tea. It is in pastries, cakes and cookies, sprinkled it over your breakfast cereal or your oatmeal. It’s hidden in sodas, fruit juices, candies, ice cream and in almost all processed foods, including breads, meats, and condiments like Worcestershire sauce and ketchup.

The best way to ensure you’re not consuming excess added sugars is to get in the habit of always scanning the ingredient list. Ingredients are listed by quantity from high to low: the closer to the front of the list a form of sugar is, the more the product contains.

Just because you don’t see “sugar” on the ingredient list when scanning a nutrition label does not guarantee the item is sugar or sweetener-free. Sugar goes by a slew of different names, hiding how much sugar is in the product.

On the Nutrition label the carbohydrate count per serving size is given as total grams, and then broken down into carbs from fiber and sugar.  Sugar should be zero as often as possible (1–2g at most).

The Most Common Names for Sugar:

‍Basic Simple Sugars (monosaccharides and disaccharides):

Dextrose

Fructose

Galactose

Glucose

Lactose

Maltose

Sucrose

Solid or Granulated Sugars:

Beet sugar

Brown sugar

Cane juice crystals

Cane sugar

Castor sugar

Coconut sugar

Confectioner’s sugar (aka, powdered sugar)

Corn syrup solids

Crystalline fructose

Date sugar

Demerara sugar

Dextrin

Diastatic malt

Ethyl maltol

Florida crystals

Golden sugar

Glucose syrup solids

Grape sugar

Icing sugar

Maltodextrin

Muscovado sugar

Panela sugar

Raw sugar

Sugar (granulated or table)

Sucanat

Turbinado sugar

Yellow sugar

Liquid or Syrup Sugars:

Agave Nectar/Syrup

Barley malt

Blackstrap molasses

Brown rice syrup

Buttered sugar/buttercream

Caramel

Carob syrup

Corn syrup

Evaporated cane juice

Fruit juice

Fruit juice concentrate

Golden syrup

High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)

Honey

Invert sugar

Malt syrup

Maple syrup

Molasses

Rice syrup

Refiner’s syrup

Sorghum syrup

Treacle

Source: https://www.virtahealth.com/blog/names-for-sugar?fbclid=IwAR0K1ln9GZ9Ndy3Eol5HIswDcvuw7ArrOodQ-WZOiQDau6gZNgCal3RyAqM

Here are some of the effects that excessive sugar intake has on your health:

  • Sugar is a primary dietary factor that drives obesity and chronic disease development.
  • Sugar causes weight gain, abdominal obesity, decreased HDL and increased LDL cholesterol levels, elevated blood sugar, elevated triglycerides, high blood pressure, Hypertension, Lipid problems, Heart disease, and Polycystic ovarian syndrome.
  • One of the most severe effects of eating too much sugar is its potential to damage your liver, leading to a condition known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Your liver metabolizes alcohol the same way as sugar – as both serve as substrates for converting dietary carbohydrate into fat. This promotes insulin resistance, fatty liver and dyslipidemia (abnormal fat levels in your blood).
  • Fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). It is found in most processed foods and drinks. HFCS is metabolized directly into fat.
  • Fructose causes superoxide free radicals to form, resulting in inflammation.
  • Fructose can directly and indirectly stimulate the brain’s “hedonic pathway” – creating habituation and dependence, the same way that alcohol does.
  • Sugar “feeds” the cancer cells, promoting cell division and speeding their growth, allowing the cancer to spread faster.
  • The metabolic theory of cancer holds sugar damages mitochondrial function and energy production, triggering cell mutations that are then fed by on going sugar consumption.

How to Manage or Limit Your Sugar Consumption

  • Your healthiest choice is to avoid or eliminate refined sugar from your diet by eating whole, organic foods, and carefully reading labels of any packaged foods you buy.
  • Avoid processed foods and beverages like soda. According to SugarScience.org, 74 % of processed foods contain added sugar stealthily hidden under different names. (See the list of names above.)
  • Severely limit your consumption of refined carbohydrates (waffles, cereals, bagels, bread, etc.) and grains, as they actually break down to sugar in your body, resulting in insulin resistance.
  • Keep your total fructose consumption below 25 grams per day, including that from whole fruit. Fruits are rich in nutrients and antioxidants, but they also naturally contain fructose.
  • Avoid artificial sweeteners like aspartame and sucralose.
  • Increase your consumption of healthy fats, such as omega-3, saturated and monounsaturated fats such as organic butter from raw milk, (unheated) virgin olive oil, coconut oil, raw nuts like pecans and macadamia, free-range eggs, avocado and wild Alaskan salmon.
  • Drink pure, clean water. The best way to gauge your water needs is to observe the color of your urine (it should be light pale yellow) and the frequency of your bathroom visits (ideally, this is around seven to eight times per day).
  • Add fermented foods to your meals, they provide detoxification support, which helps lessen the fructose burden on your liver. Some of the best choices include kimchi, natto, organic yogurt and kefir made from grass fed milk, and fermented vegetables.

This Post has been condensed from:

  1. https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/11/01/too-much-sugar-negative-effects.aspx
  2. https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2019/01/25/what-happens-to-your-body-when-you-eat-too-much-sugar/
  3. https://blog.virtahealth.com/names-for-sugar/

Please see the original for the Footnotes and Citations for the scientific studies.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

 To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Too Much Sugar?

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You add sugar to your morning cup of coffee or tea. You bake it into pastries, cakes and cookies. You even sprinkle it all over your breakfast cereal or your oatmeal for added flavor. It’s also hidden in some beloved “treats” that people consume on a daily basis, such as sodas, fruit juices, candies, ice cream and in almost all processed foods, including breads, meats, and even your favorite condiments like Worcestershire sauce and ketchup.

Sugar is toxic, addictive and deadly  – This intense addiction to sugar is becoming rampant, not just among adults, but in children as well.

Why Is Excessive Sugar Bad for Your Health?

Today, an average American consumes about 32 teaspoons of sugar per day, which is 26 pounds per year.

People are consuming excessive sugar in the form of fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). It is found in almost all types of processed foods and drinks today.  HFCS is metabolized directly into fat.

Effects of Consuming Too Much Sugar  –  Dr. Robert Lustig, a professor of Clinical Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology in the University of California and a pioneer in decoding sugar metabolism, says that your body can safely metabolize at least six teaspoons of added sugar from natural and manufactured sources per day.

Sugar: The Bitter Truth video.  Here is a full version has been viewed almost times 7.8 million times https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

This short version speaks about high-fructose corn syrup https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCjatB98vw0

Here are some of the effects that excessive sugar intake has on your health:

  • It causes weight gain, abdominal obesity, decreased HDL and increased LDL cholesterol levels, elevated blood sugar, elevated triglycerides, and high blood pressure.
  • One of the most severe effects of eating too much sugar is its potential to damage your liver, leading to a condition known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

     

    • Your liver metabolizes alcohol the same way as sugar — as both serve as substrates for converting dietary carbohydrate into fat. This promotes insulin resistance, fatty liver and dyslipidemia (abnormal fat levels in your blood).

     

    • Fructose causes superoxide free radicals to form, resulting in inflammation.

     

    • Fructose can directly and indirectly stimulate the brain’s “hedonic pathway” — creating habituation and dependence, the same way that alcohol does.

     

    • Sugar is a primary dietary factor that drives obesity and chronic disease development.

     

    • It “feeds” the cancer cells, promoting cell division and speeding their growth, allowing the cancer to spread faster.

     

    • There is a powerful connection between a high-fructose diet and your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, through the same pathway that causes Type 2 diabetes.

     

    • According to some experts, Alzheimer’s and other brain disorders may be caused by the constant burning of glucose for fuel by your brain. Other diseases that may potentially arise because of too much sugar consumption include: Hypertension, Lipid problems, Heart disease, Polycystic ovarian syndrome.

How to Manage or Limit Your Sugar Consumption  –  Avoid processed foods and beverages like soda. According to SugarScience.org, 74 % of processed foods contain added sugar stealthily hidden under different names.

Here is a link to 56 names of sugar https://blog.virtahealth.com/names-for-sugar/

Severely limit your consumption of refined carbohydrates (waffles, cereals, bagels, bread, etc.) and grains, as they actually break down to sugar in your body, resulting in insulin resistance.

As a general recommendation, keep your total fructose consumption below 25 grams per day, including that from whole fruit. Keep in mind that although fruits are rich in nutrients and antioxidants, they also naturally contain fructose.

Avoid artificial sweeteners like aspartame and sucralose.

Here are some additional dietary tips to remember:

  • Increase your consumption of healthy fats, such as omega-3, saturated and monounsaturated fats such as organic butter from raw milk, (unheated) virgin olive oil, coconut oil, raw nuts like pecans and macadamia, free-range eggs, avocado and wild Alaskan salmon.
  • Drink pure, clean water – The best way to gauge your water needs is to observe the color of your urine (it should be light pale yellow) and the frequency of your bathroom visits (ideally, this is around seven to eight times per day).
  • Add fermented foods to your meals, they provide detoxification support, which helps lessen the fructose burden on your liver. Some of the best choices include kimchi, natto, organic yogurt and kefir made from grass fed milk, and fermented vegetables.

This has been condensed from Dr. Mercola’s Post https://articles.mercola.com/sugar-side-effects.aspx

Please see his Post for the References to the supporting studies.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader