Diabetes: The Basics Part One

This is Part One of a series of three Posts. Part Two will cover more questions about Type 2 Diabetes. Part Three will cover Gestational Diabetes.

Blog Nov. 1 stop

What causes high blood sugar?

Many things can cause high blood sugar, but what we eat plays the biggest and most direct role in elevating blood sugar. When we eat carbohydrates, our body converts those carbohydrates into glucose, and this can play a role in raising blood sugar. Protein, to a certain degree, in high amounts can also raise blood sugar levels. Fat does not raise blood sugar levels. Stress leading to an increase in the hormone cortisol can also raise blood sugar levels.

What’s the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that results in the body’s inability to produce insulin. People who suffer from Type 1 diabetes must be on insulin in order to keep glucose levels within normal limits.

Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which either the body is able to produce insulin but is not able to produce enough or the body does not respond to the insulin that is being produced (known as insulin resistance). People with type 2 diabetes must be on a low carbohydrate diet to keep their diabetes from worsening.

What should your fasting blood glucose be?

A fasting blood sugar should be less than 100 in order to be considered normal.  A fasting blood sugar of >100 to 125 is consistent with prediabetes.  Fasting blood sugar levels of 126 or greater is diagnostic of diabetes.

If your fasting blood glucose is consistent with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, we recommend that you speak with your physician.

What is diabetic ketoacidosis?

Diabetic ketoacidosis (or DKA) is a serious medical condition that can result from very high levels of ketones in the blood. If it is not recognized and treated right away, then it can lead to a coma or even death. Because it is such a serious condition, a person who develops diabetic ketoacidosis is usually admitted to the hospital for treatment.

This condition occurs when the body’s cells are unable to use glucose for energy, and the body begins to break down fat for energy instead. Ketones are produced when the body breaks down fat, and very high levels of ketones can make the blood extremely acidic. The acidity can potentially cause coma and death.

People with type 1 diabetes are at risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis if they do not take their insulin, if they do not eat, or if they become sick for other reasons (such as an infection). It is very unusual for people with type 2 diabetes to develop diabetic ketoacidosis.

Ketosis vs. ketoacidosis: What is the difference?

Ketosis: Endogenous ketones are known to be safe at physiologic levels. It has long been known that ketones are an effective alternate metabolic fuel and recent studies have shown them to be potent epigenetic and hormonal signaling molecules as well. In nutritional ketosis, serum ketones range from 0.5 to 5 mM. This is the body’s normal state of lipolysis (breaking down of fats) that occurs when carbohydrates are avoided.

Ketoacidosis:In stark contrast to this normal physiology of ketosis, pathologic ketoacidosis manifests with serum levels ketone levels of 15-25 mM (i.e., three- to ten-fold higher than in nutritional ketosis). Lipolysis is exquisitely regulated, so it is exceedingly rare for a patient with normal pancreatic beta cell function to enter ketoacidosis.

How does Metformin treat prediabetes and type 2 diabetes?

The mechanism of action of metformin is not fully understood. It appears to reduce glucose production in the liver, although there is now evidence that other factors may also play a role.

What is type 1 diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the body does not produce insulin.

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone that is needed for the body to move glucose from the blood into the body’s cells. All of the organs in the body, including the brain, the heart, and the lungs, are made of cells. These cells use glucose for energy, which is why it is important for the glucose to move from the bloodstream into the cells.

The lack of insulin production in type 1 diabetes is usually caused by a problem with the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes is considered to be a permanent condition when it is diagnosed.

Prediabetes

What are the signs and symptoms of prediabetes?

Prediabetes is considered to be one of the most insidious precursors to diabetes because it may not have any signs or symptoms. This is why it is so important to do diagnostic blood tests checking a fasting glucose or hemoglobin A1c (Hba1c) test to establish a diagnosis of prediabetes. Many people who have prediabetes do not have any symptoms. By the time symptoms occurs, the diagnosis has usually already progressed to diabetes. There are some rare situations in which an individual can present with diabetes-related complications such as a retinal bleed, neuropathy or even a stroke, while only having a diagnosis of prediabetes.

What is the best diet for prediabetes?

A low carbohydrate diet is the ideal diet for prediabetes. This is because prediabetes occurs when glucose levels start to rise and the body produces insulin to try and lower the glucose levels. If the body cannot produce enough insulin or if the insulin level that the body is producing is not enough to meet the demands of the high glucose load, then glucose levels continue to rise.

How do you reverse prediabetes?

Prediabetes can be reversed by following a low carbohydrate diet.

Once glucose levels are lowered with a low carbohydrate diet, the body’s demand for insulin also goes down. As insulin levels are lowered due to lowered glucose levels, this will then be reflected in lab results such as a normal HbA1c or fasting glucose. Once Hba1c or fasting glucose has been normalized, then one can say that the prediabetes has been put into remission or reversed.

To learn more please read Reversing Diabetes 101 by Dr. Sarah Hallberg. Here is the link https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/10/12/reversing-diabetes-101-with-dr-sarah-hallberg-the-truth-about-carbs-blood-sugar-and-reversing-type-2-diabetes/

Dr. Hallberg describes how a low carbohydrate diet can be an effective treatment for insulin resistance in this video.

What is the usual treatment for prediabetes?

Some providers may prescribe Metformin to patients who suffer from prediabetes for some time and are unable to make the dietary changes to reverse their prediabetes, yet are at high risk for developing diabetes.

Many patients who receive a diagnosis of prediabetes will also be told to lose weight with diet and exercise. Weight loss also plays a role in reversing prediabetes; however, the mechanism by which prediabetes is reversed is related to lowering insulin levels, and lowering insulin levels can help reduce weight.

Can prediabetes be reversed permanently?

Prediabetes can be reversed through the dietary changes outlined here. However, it is important to understand that if someone eats a low carbohydrate diet and reverses their prediabetes but then begins eating carbohydrates again in the future, the prediabetes will return.They must eat a low carbohydrate diet lifelong in order to reverse prediabetes and keep it permanently reversed.

The source of this information is the Virta Health website. Here is the link, please copy and paste it into your address bar

https://blog.virtahealth.com/diabetes-faq/?fbclid=IwAR2moJQwFn_V-SZbYAbxBGoWfnL-cS42Hj2ShZk7wwNWbjKl19wPgkoYzc0

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 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

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Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Diabetes Type-2: The Underlying Causes.

In this video, Dr Hallberg goes over the underlying causes of type 2 diabetes, how to reverse it through nutritional ketosis, and most importantly, what the research says. What follows is the condensed transcript.

Carbohydrate intolerance and insulin resistance.

What does these terms mean?

To understand, let us start with insulin. Insulin is a hormone our fat storage hormone. You can’t store fat without insulin. Insulin is what helps us dispose of blood sugar from our circulation into the cells where it can be used. When we eat insulin rises different amounts depending on what we eat, to help us dispose of blood sugar.

It’s important to understand what the insulin response is to the different macronutrients and what we see is the same thing that happens with blood sugar, which makes sense because if our blood sugar is rising, our insulin is going to need to go up as well to dispose of that blood sugar, pushing it into the cells.

So what we see is that with carbohydrate consumption insulin goes up a lot. Peaks quickly and drops fast. With protein it gets a lot better. Look at what happens when we consume fat – nothing there’s not an insulin response. That’s going to be important as we make our food choices – what actually happens with insulin and blood sugar when we eat.

The first thing that I think we need to start with, is understanding how much sugar is actually in our blood or our circulation at any given time. The average adult has five liters of blood running through their circulation at all times. If you think of a two-liter of soda I mean this is a lot of blood and in that blood their sugar. But actually the amount of sugar is a lot less than most people think.

An average blood sugar – most people realize a good one would be less than a hundred but less than a hundred what?What does that mean in a context that we can wrap our head around? If you do the math on this what that means is five grams of sugar dissolved in five litres of blood. Not much, especially when you realize five grams actually is just a teaspoon. What’s supposed to happen after we eat is when blood sugar starts to rise, insulin rises and helps us dispose of sugar into cells where it can be used. But remember I said that’s what’s supposed to happen in a system that’s functioning normally.

But now let’s get into insulin resistanceand the food choices that we make. Now most of you realize that a soda is not a good food choice. Right. We can all accept that. A can of sugared soda is not gonna be healthy for us. We know it’s gonna cause our blood sugars to rise. Why? It’s full of sugar.

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Other carbohydrate food choices that we sometimes think are healthy for us are full of just as much sugar. If we compare a can of soda to a cup of brown rice, the brown rice has more sugar than the can of soda. More. It’s amazing.

Let’s take a look at what happens if we eat a cup of brown rice. You might have thought that was a good choice for two reasons, Number one it’s low fat, number two it’s actually pretty low calorie. A cup of rice only has about 200 calories.

Foods that we think are healthy for us, we’ve been told are healthy for us, if we have insulin resistance they’re still not a good food choice.

So for someone who consumes a cup of brown rice but is insulin resistant, here’s what we found – a cup of brown rice contains 45 grams of carbohydrates. That’s 9 teaspoons of sugar. You remember, in our system there’s one teaspoon. What is our system to do with nine teaspoons rushing in from a supposedly healthy food? What our body does is insulin levels rise and as insulin levels rise it helps push the sugar into the cells, so that our body can keep the 1 teaspoon at a teaspoon.

That’s what’s supposed to happen but in someone who is insulin resistant insulin isn’t doing its job.So as those 45 grams come rushing into our circulation, we’re unable to dispose of them as we should. So our body’s response to that it’s just make more and more insulin.

Our insulin levels, they rise and they rise. We’re carbohydrate intolerant. So we have to be very cautious here and not presume that some of these healthy carbs are actually just that. Because when the carbohydrates are high and we are insulin resistant. They’re gonna cause a problem either way. They haven’t gotten high enough and we can dispose of the sugar for a while. But years, maybe even decades later our system can’t keep up any longer and our blood sugars start to rise. That’s now diabetes.

Let’s talk about carbohydrate tolerance vs. carbohydrate intolerance.Some people have a high carbohydrate tolerance. What does that mean? When they consume foods, specifically carbohydrates their insulin levels will rise, they need to, to dispose of the sugar coming in into the cells. But they don’t need that much insulin because their carbohydrate tolerance is high.

Now, for people who have a low carbohydrate tolerance who are carbohydrate intolerant, if they consume the exact same food, let’s say a cup of brown rice. What’s gonna happen with their insulin levels? They’re gonna go up dramatically, because their body is resistant to the insulin and therefore they need a lot more of it, a lot more insulin, a lot more of our fat storage hormone to dispose of the same amount of carbohydrates. So what we see here two very different things – high carbohydrate tolerance, low carbohydrate tolerance.

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With low carbohydrate tolerance this is driven by insulin resistance causing our body to need to make much more insulin, much more fat storage hormone.What does that do? It puts us into a vicious cycle. So for someone who has a low carbohydrate tolerance if they eat carbohydrates over their tolerance, what happens is they need more insulin. So our body releases more insulin and this actually leads to the insulin resistance getting worse.And around and around we go. People get stuck in this, they get stuck in this vicious cycle when they have a low carbohydrate tolerance driven by insulin resistance.

Source: Dr. Hallberg on Carbohydrate Intolerance, Insulin Resistance and Reversing Diabetes. Here is the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldzaLP8oAHw&t=3s

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

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Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Keto: The Best Fatty Liver Diet

The ketogenic diet is a good diet for reversing nonalcoholic liver disease. It is improved by following these guidelines:

  1. Restrict Carbohydrates to 5% of Your Daily Calories
  2. Eat High-Fiber Foods With Every Meal
  3. Eat Liver Healing Foods such as oily fish, nuts avocado and olive oil.
  4. Use Liver Healing Supplements such as spirulina, betaine, milk thistle and probiotics.
  5. Limit Alcohol Consumption
  6. Exercise Everyday – brisk walks, resistance training.

There are two main types of fatty liver disease:

  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NFLD)
  • Alcoholic fatty liver disease (alcoholic steatohepatitis)

There are five conditions that are commonly associated with NFLD: type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, dyslipidemia (abnormally elevated cholesterol levels), and metabolic syndrome. Scientists believe that they are intimately linked because they can all be caused by a combination of lifestyle, genetics, and gut health issues.

In epidemiological studies including people with type 2 diabetes, 62 to 69% of them also had NFLD. Another study found that 50% of patients with dyslipidemia (abnormally elevated cholesterol levels) had NFLD.

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NFLD usually causes no signs and symptoms. When it does, they may include:

  • Enlarged liver
  • Fatigue
  • Pain in the upper right abdomen

Possible signs and symptoms of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis (advanced scarring) include:

  • Abdominal swelling (ascites)
  • Enlarged blood vessels just beneath the skin’s surface
  • Enlarged breasts in men
  • Enlarged spleen
  • Red palms
  • Yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice)

What Causes Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?

  1. Lifestyle – Eating Too Much and Exercising Too Little
  • Insulin resistance is a common side effect of eating too much and exercising too little, and it is one of the main reasons why fat builds up in the liver.Many researchers agree that improving insulin sensitivity is a key strategy in the treatment of NFLD.
  • The quickest way to increase fat build up in the liver is by overfeeding on carbohydrates.Fructose, especially, will lead to the most fat accumulation in the liver.
  1. Genetics — Gene Variants, Gender, and Ethnicity
  • Genetics can play a role in the development of NFLD. It is important to develop healthy lifestyle habits if your parents and grandparents struggled with NFLD.
  1. Gut Health Issues — Your Microbiome and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
  • Studies done on the microbiome of obese patients have increased abundance of the bacteria called Firmicutes. This increase leads to an increase in lipopolysaccharide absorption that triggers a potent inflammatory response in the body.

Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis – When The Bad Gets Worse

The increase in lipopolysaccharides absorption caused by a poor diet and an obesity-causing microbiome can disrupt the liver so much that NFLD progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

This form of NFLD affects 20-30% of patients with NFLD, and it occurs when the build up of fat in the liver leads to inflammation that can result in liver cell damage.

The fat cells eventually become overloaded and begin to secrete inflammatory cytokines. These inflammatory cytokines increase inflammation levels and cause reactive oxygen species to accumulate (oxidative stress). As poor lifestyle choices continue, so much fat builds up in the liver that it leads to lipotoxicity (accumulation of fat in non-fat cells). The combination of lipotoxicity and oxidative stress can cause hormonal disturbances and liver damage.

In the gut NFLD promoting lifestyle changes the microbiome. This increases inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipopolysaccharide absorption, which causes more liver damage.

You are not doomed to get nonalcoholic steatohepatitis because like type 2 diabetes, obesity, and heart disease, NFLD is reversible with the same lifestyle changes.

How To Reverse Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

The key to disrupting the vicious cycle of NFLD before it damages the liver is exercise and diet.

Many scientific papers agree that the treatment of NFLD should be focused on controlling diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. We should only focus on treating the liver in those with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

This means that the best way to reverse NFLD and prevent liver damage is with a diet that has been proven to control diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia.

The Ketogenic Diet May Be The Best Fatty Liver Diet

Weight loss is essential when reversing NFLD. The best way to achieve this weight loss, however, is not with caloric restriction.

The ketogenic diet has been proven to be more effective than a calorie-restricted diet at reversing type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, hyperlipidemia and NFLD.

A recent pilot study put five patients on the ketogenic diet (less than 20 grams per day of carbohydrate). Each patient underwent a liver biopsy, and four of the five patients showed a reduction in liver fat, inflammation, and fibrosis. This provides preliminary evidence that the ketogenic diet can reverse NFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

NFLD is so intimately associated with type 2 diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease that it is believed to be caused by the same factors. These factors are an unhealthy lifestyle, genetics, and gut health issues (an obesity and inflammation causing microbiome).

The combination of the ketogenic diet and exercise makes a great treatment for NFLD.

This Post has been condensed from the Keto: The best Fatty Liver Diet https://www.ruled.me/keto-best-fatty-liver-diet/

To learn more please read, How Do I Do the Ketogenic Diet? https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/04/13/how-do-i-do-the-ketogenic-diet/

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Key Dietary Strategies to Protect Yourself from Alzheimer’s

Highlights:

  • Diets high in carbohydrates, and diets low in healthy fats, lead to Alzheimer’s disease
  • Diets high in carbohydrates are associated with an 89 % increased risk for dementia. High-fat diets are associated with a 44 % reduced risk
  • Alzheimer’s is directly related to chronically elevated blood sugar levels
  • Diabetes doubles your risk for Alzheimer’s disease
  • You can regenerate cells in your brain’s memory center through a process called neurogenesis.
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Saturated Fats Are a Critical Part of a Heart- and Brain-Healthy Diet. Saturated fat is needed to have good cholesterol in your body.

Dr. Perlmutter cites a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, which found that women who are given cholesterol-lowering statin medication have a 44 % increased risk for becoming a type 2 diabetic.Diabetes, in turn, doubles your risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s Is Directly Related to Elevated Blood Sugar Levels.     A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in August 2013 demonstrates that even mild elevation of blood sugar – a level of around 105 or 110 mg/dl – was associated with an elevated risk for becoming demented.

Dr. Perlmutter believes the ideal fasting blood sugar level is around 70-85. People who are keto-adapted (eating low-carb, high-fat) are burning fat and they can get by with much lower blood sugar.

Your brain does not need sugar. The brain loves to burn fat, specifically ketones, which your body produces by metabolizing your fat.

Eat the Right Types of Fat:             Healthy fats include Avocados, Butter made from raw, grass-fed organic milk, Raw dairy, Organic pastured egg yolks, Coconuts and coconut oil, Unheated organic nut oils, Raw nuts, such as pecans and macadamia, which are low in protein and high in healthy fats, and Grass-fed meats. Avoid all trans fats or hydrogenated fats i.e. margarine, vegetable oils, and butter-like spreads.

Our ancestral diet was very high in saturated fats and virtually void of non-vegetable carbohydrates. Our bodies were not designed to eat carbs are refined and highly processed and foods that are genetically engineered grains and sugar (GMO sugar beets and corn). 

This underpins almost every health malady that we are trying to deal with today.

Exercise reduces free radical production and inflammation,both of which are drivers for chronic disease. Exercise has been shown to turn on a brain growth hormone called BDNF, (brain-derived neurotrophic factor). BDNF codes for your brain’s ability to both repair itself and grow new brain cells.

Dr. Perlmutter recommends high-intensity interval training (HIIT), which provides you with the equivalent of two hours of conventional aerobic exercise in just 20 minutes.

Learn more at 15 minutes of resistance weight training is all the exercise I need for the week to build muscle.

https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/05/25/15-minutes-of-resistance-weight-training-is-all-the-exercise-i-need-for-the-week-to-build-muscle/

Dr. Perlmutter’s Grain Brain program includes other recommendations, not limited to:

  • Turmeric, for its anti-inflammatory potential and ability to activate BDNF for brain health.
  • An optimal vitamin D level of around 70-90 nanograms per milliliter (ng/ml) year-round.
  • Optimizing your gut health by reseeding your gut with beneficial bacteria (probiotics).
  • Avoid antibiotics and eating CAFO meats (concentrated animal feeding operations)which provide you with traces of antibiotics in each bite. These antibiotics kill beneficial bacteria.
  • Measuring your gluten sensitivity with a Cyrex [Array 3] test.Dr. Fasano discovered that gluten can also make your blood-brain barrier leaky.

A high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet is not just for the treatment of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. It’s the right diet for ALL brain-related disorders. 

Choose above-ground vegetables which, include kale, chard, collards, broccoli, and spinach. These also contain plenty of healthy fiber – you really do not need grains.

Choose grass-fed products – wild fish, pasture-raised chicken, and farm-raised or pasture-raised eggs.

This Post has been condensed from Key Dietary Strategies to Protect Yourself from Alzheimer’s https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/04/27/diet-alzheimers-disease.aspx

 I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Ten Defining Characteristics of a Well-Formulated Ketogenic Diet by Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, Jeff Volek, PhD, RD This is Part Two.

Note: This Post contains the last 5 characteristics. The first 5 where posted last week. Here is the link to the Blog Post https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2019/03/22/ten-defining-characteristics-of-a-well-formulated-ketogenic-diet-part-one/

To promote a better understanding of what constitutes a well-formulated ketogenic diet, we have identified 10 key characteristics:

  1. Sustains nutritional ketosis
  2. Maintains or improves lean body mass and performance
  3. Effective electrolyte, mineral and hydration management
  4. Fat provides majority of dietary energy in all phases
  5. Counting calories is not necessary for success
  6. Totally or predominantly composed of ‘whole foods’
  7. Short-term very low-calorie diets should be avoided until proven effective in long term studies
  8. Contraindicated for chronic conditions unless a credible long-term maintenance phase has been demonstrated
  9. On going expert medical supervision required for medication management of chronic conditions (e.g., type 2 diabetes, hypertension)
  10. A well-formulated ketogenic diet does not necessarily adhere to traditional dietary guidelines

The emphasis is on whole foods.

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Defining Characteristic #6: A WFKD is preferably composed of all or mostly whole, unprocessed foods.

  • Choose fresh unprocessed vegetables, meats, eggs, dairy, berry fruit, and minimally seasoned nuts and seeds when possible
  • Fresh frozen choices with no added sugar and minimal processing are also encouraged
  • Fermented foods with no added sugar are allowed (e.g., yogurt, sauerkraut, pickles, kimchi).
  • Specialty frozen low carbohydrate meals can be used as needed
  • Exceptions to whole foods (electrolyte replacement): Magnesium and Bouillon (sodium)
  • Purified protein sources, specialized fats, high potency vitamin formulations, and meal-replacement formulations should be used sparingly.

Defining Characteristic #7: Any ketogenic regimen under 1000 kcal/d (very-low calorie diets (VLCD)) does not qualify as a WFKD due to a lack of adequate macronutrients and calories for long-term sustainability.

  • To our knowledge there are no published studies of sizeable cohorts fed a VLCD for up to 6 months that did not demonstrate substantial weight regain within 12 months. While very restricted prepared formula or food-based diets can have dramatic short-term effects on body weight and disease reversal, these benefits have proven to be fleeting when viewed one to two years post intervention.

Defining Characteristic #8: If intended to treat, manage, or reverse a chronic condition, a WFKD needs to have a credible maintenance phase that can be followed for years and decades.

  • For people with underlying insulin resistance in particular, a well-formulated ketogenic diet eaten to satiety frequently allows one to achieve a natural transition into a sustainable maintenance pattern of eating.
  • A short-term ketogenic diet or VLCD followed by the re-introduction of carbohydrate in amounts that reverse nutritional ketosis is seldom successful at maintaining weight loss or metabolic health long-term.
  • Long-term severe voluntary calorie restriction resulting in constant hunger is NOT a credible, sustainable maintenance strategy.
  • High volume exercise, particularly in individuals with a history of diabetes or obesity, is rarely an effective weight maintenance strategy in the absence of some degree of on-going carbohydrate restriction.

Defining Characteristic #9: A therapeutic WFKD requires expert supervision and avoidance of unnecessary cycling in and out of nutritional ketosis.

  • If intended to improve diabetes or hypertension, inconsistent and intermittent restriction of carbohydrate intake alone or in combination with restriction of total calories in the context of on-going medication use adds unacceptable risk of medication side-effects.
  • While time restricted feeding or intermittent fasting for periods less than 24 hours may be tolerated within the definition of a WFKD, any fasting longer than 24 hours, even if infrequent, is not likely to confer long-term benefits for those with chronic medical conditions.

Defining Characteristic #10: A well-formulated ketogenic diet does not necessarily adhere to traditional dietary guidelines.

  • A well-formulated ketogenic diet has characteristics that cannot be consistent with traditional dietary guidelines.
  • A “ketogenic diet” that is very energy restricted but contains a substantial carbohydrate content (e.g., 50% or more of energy), moderate protein, and low fat is not a well-formulated ketogenic diet.
  • Always consult with a trained physician when beginning a well-formulated ketogenic diet, especially if you have any health conditions and/or you are taking any medications.
  • If all of these ten characteristics are not addressed correctly, it is likely not a well-formulated ketogenic diet.

Nutritional ketosis achieved by consuming a well-formulated ketogenic diet can be a safe and sustainable therapy for a variety of conditions, particularly those driven by underlying insulin resistance or inflammation. To have a lasting effect, however, in most cases the physiological blood ketone levels characteristic of nutritional ketosis need to be maintained, along with adequate intake of electrolytes and minerals. When used to reverse disease states requiring medication withdrawal, constant medical oversight during the early phases of the dietary intervention is needed.

With attention to these 10 defining characteristics, we have demonstrated that a safe and sustainable state of nutritional ketosis is within reach for a majority of motivated adults who choose to try it.

SOURCE: The Ten Defining Characteristics of a Well-Formulated Ketogenic Diet

Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, Jeff Volek, PhD, RD on August 13, 2018. This post has been condensed from the original Virta Post.

https://blog.virtahealth.com/well-formulated-ketogenic-diet/

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

The Sad Saga of Saturated Fat

In the US and Canada dietary guidelines do not take into consideration the recent extensive scientific research into role of saturated fats.

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Two generations of researchers have tried to prove that eating saturated fat (such as beef, pork, dairy, eggs, chocolate, and tropical oils) causes heart disease. This hypothesis is false.For proof look to multiple recent meta-analyses of large populations followed carefully for decades, examining what they eat and what they die of.  All show no consistent association between dietary saturated fat intake and risk for heart disease or death from all causes.In fact some of these studies show just the opposite – they suggest that one’s risk for a coronary event increases when dietary saturated fat is reduced and replaced by carbohydrate.

By continuing to provoke fear about the harmful effects of saturated fat, the likely response is that people will seek out foods low in fat and higher in carbohydrate. In fact, according to a government-funded survey, Americans have decreased their consumption of saturated fat and replaced those calories with an even greater amount of carbohydrate. In the same time interval rates of obesity and diabetes have rocketed skywards.

Much of what we’ve been taught about dietary fat is wrong. How could this be – a good place to start would be to read Good Calories, Bad Caloriesby Gary Taubes andThe Big Fat Surpriseby Nina Teicholz, both highly regarded investigative journalists.

In short, 50 years ago diseased coronary arteries were found to contain buildups of cholesterol and saturated fat. Professor Ancel Keyes of the University of Minnesota hypothesizedthat too much of these two nutrients in the diet were the cause – i.e., his hypothesis was built on the flawed concept that you are what you eat. Then came well-done studies showing that blood levels of saturated fats predict future cases of heart disease and diabetes, thus appearing to support Keyes’ hypothesis. But this works only if you believe “you are what you eat”,a concept that doesn’t pass the common sense test.

Obviously, the key question here is, what’s the precise relationship between dietary saturated fat and blood levels of saturated fat?”The scientific evidence clearly shows that dietary saturated fat intake has little to do with saturated levels in our blood, then what does? There is, in fact, sound evidence that dietary carbohydrate is a major determinant of serum saturated fat levels.

 We know this because two respected research groups fed humans carefully measured, weight-maintaining diets either high in carbohydrate or moderate in carbohydrate. In both studies, blood levels of saturated fats went up dramatically on the high carb diets, even though they were very low in fat.

We (Virta) performed a weight loss study during which we fed diets varying from 32 up to 84 grams of saturated fat per day, with “healthy carbohydrate” making up the energy difference when dietary fat was reduced. In blood triglycerides and cholesteryl esters, saturated fat levels trended upwards when the high carbohydrate, very low fat diet was consumed, despite the diet being energy restricted, causing on-going body fat loss.

A high carbohydrate intake has two effects in the body that promote higher levels of saturated fat.

First, carbohydrates stimulate the body to make more insulin, which inhibits the oxidation of saturated fat. Thus, when insulin levels are high, saturated fat tends to be stored rather than burned as fuel.

Second, a high carbohydrate intake promotes the synthesis of saturated fat in the liver.

This is particularly problematic for individuals with insulin resistance, characterized as “carbohydrate intolerance” in our recent book, (Volek J, Phinney SD. The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living. Beyond Obesity, May 2011.) Available through Amazonhttps://www.amazon.com/Art-Science-Low-Carbohydrate-Living/dp/0983490708

Insulin resistance makes it harder for muscles to take up and use blood sugar, thus causing a higher propensity for the liver to convert dietary carbohydrate into body fat.

This combination of decreased oxidation and increased synthesis of saturated fat therefore results in accumulation of saturated fats in the blood and tissues.The culprit then is clearly not dietary saturated fat, but rather consumption of more carbohydrate than an individual’s body can efficiently manage.This threshold of carbohydrate tolerance varies from person to person, and it can also change over a lifetime.

In addition to the studies mentioned above in which high carbohydrate feeding increased blood levels of saturated fats, we conducted a pair of studies allowing 6-12 weeks for adaptation to moderate carbohydrate or very low carbohydrate diets. Because these were not very low-calorie diets, the low-carb diets were naturally pretty high in fat, containing 2-3 fold greater intakes of saturated fat than the moderate carbohydrate diets used as controls.

The results were pretty striking: compared to low-fat diets, blood levels of saturated fat were markedly decreased in response to the low carbohydrate, high fat diets.Our data indicates that this occurred because the low insulin levels accelerated the oxidation of all fats (and particularly saturated fat); plus the relative few dietary carbohydrates meant there wasn’t much of it to be converted into saturated fats. Thus, from the body’s perspective, a low-carbohydrate diet reduces blood saturated fat levels irrespective of dietary saturated fat intake.

There is convincing evidence that dietary carbohydrate exerts an important influence on how the body processes saturated fat. Thus, saturated fat, whether made in the body or eaten in the diet, is more likely to accumulate when aided and abetted by high levels of dietary carbohydrate, particularly in insulin-resistant individuals (as in type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome*).

* Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of at least three of the five following medical conditions: central obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high serum triglycerides, and low serum high-density lipoprotein. Metabolic syndrome is associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metabolic_syndrome

A one-size-fits-all recommendation to aggressively lower saturated fat intake with the expectation of lowering blood saturated fat levels is intellectually invalid and likely to backfire.

SOURCE: The Sad Saga of Saturated Fat by Jeff Volek, PhD, RD and Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD https://blog.virtahealth.com/the-sad-saga-of-saturated-fat/?fbclid=IwAR28z406CUcbrwZ-kdEWAoko7-gOMgPNJ4fgxy0HSeLkdLfZW1co244xP3cIn Categories: Science & Research. Please see the extensive list of studies under References.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

 To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) – What is GAPS?

In this video, Dr Natasha Campbell McBride – author of Gut And Psychology Syndrome talks about her personal experience as the mother of an autistic child and how the GAPS protocol can help heal psychological and physiological disease.
This from the transcript of Part 1 of 3 videos. Here is the link to part 1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epkFl5qaYEU
Dr. McBride: It is a personal story like with many other mainstream doctors. In order for us to move into the alternative field we have to have some personal reason for it.
My first child was diagnosed autistic at the age of 3. That threw me into a very steep learning curve when I discovered that my own profession had nothing to offer my child.
As a result of that search as of now he’s a healthy young adult with no traces of autism left. He’s leading a normal life. He’s driving a car. He’s got a girlfriend. He’s going to university. So everything is absolutely fine.
As that start learning curve progressed, GAPS got developed, gut and psychology syndrome. As the name implies it establishes a connection between the functioning of the digestive system and the functioning of the brain in the person because that contact is very, very tight. What’s happening in the digestive system doesn’t just affect the brain. It affects everything else in the body.
So the second part of GAPS syndrome has gut and physiology syndrome which includes all sorts of physical conditions such as autoimmunity, multiple sclerosis and diabetes type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis includes the diseases of low energy, supply low energy production such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome and ME (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis) and allergies and all types of arthritis and all sorts of other physical conditions.
When we talk about gut and psychology syndrome we talk about the function of the brain. Here we talk about autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and dyslexia and dyspraxia and various other mixtures of learning behavioral and social problems in children and adults. That also includes psychiatric conditions such as bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder in schizophrenia and eating disorders and addictions and epilepsy.
So when we talk about gut and psychology and gut and physiology syndrome we talk about the roots of our health because the roots of the human health are embedded in the digestive tract.
It’s a digestive tract that feeds us and nurtures us and nourishes us and looks after us. In these people (GAPS people) because they develop abnormal gut flora their digestive system instead of being a source of nourishment for them becomes a major source of toxicity in the body.
Foods don’t get digested properly so the person develops multiple nutritional deficiencies. The gut lining itself deteriorates becomes porous and leaky and lets through partially digested foods When this partially digested foods are found in the bloodstream by the immune system, the immune system attacks them it recognizes them as foreign substances.
The person starts developing food allergies and intolerances to all sorts of foods. It’s not due to the problem with the food itself is due to the fact that their gut lining is like a sieve.
So the treatment has to be focusing on the gut lining on healing and sealing the gut lining. In these people their gut flora gets taken over by pathogenic microbes: pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, worms, parasites all sorts of things.
These pathogens digest food that comes home in their own way converting it into hundreds and hundreds of very toxic substances. These toxic substances are absorbed through the damaged gut lining into the bloodstream and get distributed around the body.
When they get in the brain they impair the brain function. When they get into joints they cause arthritis. If they get into lungs they would cause some other disease if they get into your skin they can go psoriasis eczema or any other disease of the skin. Whatever they get to they cause trouble around the body. So that’s what in essence GAPS is.
In the next few weeks I will post the following videos:
Part 2
Dr. Natasha explains when you should see a mainstream doctor and how the body can kickstart its own healing process for many degenerative diseases – even when things seem hopeless.
Part 3
Dr. Natasha talks about the healing wisdom of our bodies.
It is my desire to follow the GAPS diet for nutritional healing of the gut and therefore the brain and the rest of the body. I will also use the macros of the Ketogenic diet to control body fat. Thank you for reading my Posts. It will be an interesting journey.
Disclaimer: The content of this email is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.
If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.
As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics.
May you Live Long Healthy.
Yours truly,
Lydia Polstra
lpolstra@bell.net

Wheat Makes You Fat In Three Ways

Wheat Makes You Fat In Three Ways
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I know we love our bread, but did you know….
There are three major hidden reasons that wheat products, not just gluten is a major contributor to obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, dementia, depression and so many other modern ills.
Today’s wheat products is made from a scientifically engineered food product developed in the last 50 years. It is different in three important ways that all drive obesity and more.

  1. It contains a Super Starch — amylopectin A that is super fattening. (It fluffs up Bread and Cinnabons).
  2. It contains a form of Super Gluten that is super-inflammatory. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye, spelt and oats.
  3. It contains forms of a Super Drug that is super-addictive and makes you crave and eat more.
    • Bottom line: wheat is an addictive appetite stimulant.
A major study in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that hidden gluten sensitivity (elevated antibodies without full-blown celiac disease) was shown to increase risk of death by 35 to 75 percent, mostly by causing heart disease and cancer. 
 
How Eating gluten causes inflammation, heart disease, obesity, diabetes and cancer.
  • Most of the increased risk occurs when gluten triggers inflammation that damages the gut lining.
  • Then all the bugs and partially-digested food particles inside your intestine get across the gut barrier and are exposed your immune system.
  • Your immune system starts attacking these foreign proteins, leading to systemic inflammation that then causes heart disease, dementia, cancer, diabetes and more.
As always, I am interested in your thoughts on the topics I blog.  Please send me your comments to lpolstra@bell.net. Is there any topic that I can research for you? Please let me know. 
 
May you Live Long Healthy,
Yours Truly,
Lydia Polstra

Which Fats Do I Use To Replace Vegetable Oils?

 The best fats are low in Polyunsaturated Fats (blue) and high in either Monounsaturated (yellow) or Saturated Fats (red).
I use coconut oil in my cooking or heating meals. Butter is wonderful in baking. Olive oil is fantastic on salads.
My daily eating plan includes both coconut oil and olive oil.  That way I get both of the healthy fats: Monounsaturated and Saturated fats.

Health - Diet Ketogenic, Fatty Acid in Oils, Dr. Phinney 2016.png

Where did I get the chart? I got it from Dr. Phinney in his presentation:   ‘Recent Developments in LCHF and Nutritional Ketosis’
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8uSv6OgHJE
STEPHEN PHINNEY a physician scientist who has spent 35 years studying diet, exercise, fatty acids, and inflammation.  He has held academic positions at the Universities of Vermont, Minnesota, and California at Davis; and leadership positions at Monsanto, Galileo Laboratories, and Efficas.  He received his MD from Stanford University, PhD in Nutritional Biochemistry from MIT, and did post-doctoral research at Harvard.

He has designed, completed, and published data from more than 20 clinical protocols involving foods, diets, exercise, oxidative stress, and inflammation.  His recent work in the private sector has resulted in several issued and pending patents.  He has authored more than 70 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters on a wide variety of topics, including the effects of diets and specific nutrients on inflammation, the interaction between diet and exercise and their effects on obesity, body composition, physical performance, and cellular membrane structure.

Dr. Phinney’s clinical experience includes 20 years of inpatient and outpatient clinical nutrition, including directing multidisciplinary weight management programs in 3 locations.  As an internationally recognized expert in obesity, carbohydrate-restricted diets, diet and performance, and essential fatty acid metabolism, he has given hundreds of presentations to industry, health care professional, and lay audiences.

In collaboration with Dr. Eric Westman and Dr. Jeff Volek, he co-authored the New York Times Best Selling “The New Atkins for a New You” published in March 2010.

I highly recommend this book.
Please consider changing the fats you consume. Eating the right fuel is a good habit to get in.
If you wish to contact me please email me at lpolstra@bell.net

Genetics does not have to dictate my health.

Hello, my name is Lydia. I believe the best way to predict my future is to create it. To do that, I make it a habit to improve my health.

My goal is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly my overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

Why am I so concerned, you may ask. My motivation came from watching my mother suffer from numerous illnesses. Her life was regulated by when she had to take her drugs.

I have been retired for a while and I have yet to experience any of her illnesses. I attribute that to eating a wholesome diet and exercise.

I supplement my diet with high-quality vitamins, mineral supplements.

In my posts, I focus on two diets: the Ketogenic (Low-Carb) and GAPS (Gut and Psychology / Physiology Syndrome) diets.

Continue reading “Genetics does not have to dictate my health.”