High Insulin Causes Insulin Resistance.

Metabolic syndrome (Metabolic Syndrome X) is when your cholesterol is too high, you have insulin resistance, you have high blood sugar, high blood pressure, central obesity.

Metabolic syndrome should really be called hyperinsulinemia syndrome.  The conventional view point is that insulin resistance leads to increased insulin. Is that actually true? Is it the insulin resistance that causes high insulin or is it the high insulin that causes insulin resistance?

To figure this out observe what happens after gastric bypass wherethey are bypassing part of the small intestine, which is one part of the body that affects insulin. The other part is the pancreas but there’s something in the small intestine that activates insulin. So when you do gastric bypass you correct part of the high insulin problem, you reduce insulin. They find after this procedure that it reverses type-2 diabetes by 83 %. It also reverses high blood pressure by 63 % as well as reversing high cholesterol by 61 %.

Blog - 1

Diabetes type 2, (high blood sugar), hypertension and cholesterol is Syndrome X. Reducing insulin also improves sleep apnea,polycystic ovarian syndrome, fatty liver, GERD (like acid reflux) and even joint pain. This study that I’m basing this on is this very interesting because they looked at 423 other studies but focused on 58 of the ones that actually measured insulin. The direct finding was if you reduce insulin you produced changes with so many different conditions. Metabolic syndrome (Syndrome X) includes several diseases or shall we say symptoms of this high insulin.

Blog - 2

When you have high insulin over a period of time the body is going to start to resist it, the insulin receptors are going to start to resist that high-level. It is high insulin that causes the insulin resistance. Once you have insulin resistance, the bio-feedback loops will further raise insulin but only if you keepconsuming the things that trigger insulin carbohydrates, frequent eating.

In type 2 diabetes you have insulin resistance and you also have high insulin for a period of time until the cells that make insulin get weaker and weaker and weaker and your blood sugar’s go higher and higher and higher. So you initially have high insulin and it goes lower.

In obesity you have high insulin as well but you could also have diabetes type 2 and not be overweight you can be skinny and still have insulin. Why is this so important? Well if it is true that high insulin leads to insulin resistance that leads to pre-diabetes and then diabetes thenit would be very important to actually measure insulin early on and not only focus on blood sugars. Identifying through a blood test what your insulin is doing would be the best indicator to predict and even prevent insulin resistance as well as pre-diabetes and diabetes.

But unfortunately there are certain doctors are focused primarily on the blood sugars and the bigger problem of that not understanding this concept is to eventually start prescribing insulin to a diabetic type 2.

Think about this, if you have hyperthyroidism, you have too much thyroid hormones would you give that patient more thyroid hormones. Or you have a hyper cortisol problem it’s called Cushing’s would you give that patient high cortisol? Of course not but you would only know if they had high cortisol or high thyroid hormone or high insulin if you tested it unfortunately that’s rarely tested.

In summary, it’s high insulin that occurs way before the pre-diabetes and diabetes. A person will not have high blood sugars for many years but they may have a lot of other problems that will then be treated separately like they do with the lipids and high blood pressure and a lot of these other things.

The things that trigger insulin are primarily the over consumption of carbohydrates and the frequent eating and the snacking that people are involved with to prevent their blood sugars from dropping.

This post has been condensed from Dr. Berg’s Post Metabolic Syndrome Should Really Be Called Hyperinsulinemia Syndrome https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1gB0RTqi-I

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise. 

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

Please let me know you are interested in the Post by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/

Does Your Thyroid Need Dietary Carbohydrates?

Blog - April 12 thyroid.png

Thyroid hormones have an important role in regulating metabolic rate. When some people adopt a low-carbohydrate lifestyle, their thyroid hormone levels may change. Several factors may contribute to the thyroid response.

Firstly,eating fewer calories than you expend, causing weight loss, prompts the body to reduce thyroid function to slow its metabolism. That’s because the body interprets any form of energy restriction from any cause as a sign of famine, leading it to reduce metabolism by 5-15% to conserve energy stores.

Secondly,even when energy is not restricted, a ketogenic diet seems to result in improved thyroid hormone sensitivity (i.e., it takes less hormone to produce the same effect), and puts less of a burden on thyroid hormone (T4) production in the thyroid gland and its conversion to T3 in the liver.

It has been repeatedly demonstrated that a well-formulated ketogenic diet (WFKD) improves insulin sensitivity, often dramatically so in people with insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes. There is also strong evidence that the brain’s sensitivity to the satiety hormone leptin is improved during nutritional ketosis as well. Thus an improved thyroid hormone response during a low-carb, high-fat eating diet would be quite consistent with these other documented improvements in hormone sensitivity.

How many published studies from well designed, prospective human trials have shown that impaired thyroid function (i.e., hypothyroidism) occurs on a ketogenic diet? The answer to this question is quick and simple – NONE!

It is common to find recommendations on the internet for daily carb intakes at or above 100 grams per day to maintain “normal thyroid function.” But here’s the key question: are these higher thyroid hormone levels really normal, or is this a relatively hyperthyroid state (compared to nutritional ketosis) driven by excess dietary carbohydrates?What if the lower T3 levels associated with a WFKD are indicative of optimum T3 sensitivity and thus the true physiologic norm for humans?

The other proposed “cure” for this “problem” is to intermittently eat lots of carbs. What sense does it make to be jerking the body back to deal with the disposal of high carbohydrate loads? Given that blood beta-hydroxybutyrate levels characteristic of nutritional ketosis reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, why would you want to shut down this beneficial effect even part of the time?

If carbohydrate-restricted diets were having a negative effect on thyroid function, it would be predicted that a disproportionate number of people would develop clinically obvious cases of thyroid failure (hypothyroidism) while following a ketogenic diet.Let’s look and see how many new cases of low-carb-induced hypothyroidism were reported in a number of large randomized studies published in the last decade.  Please see the CHARTBlog - April  chart.png

While these studies were not purposefully designed to look for thyroid dysfunction, overt hypothyroidism is hard to miss. These studies were all run by (or involved monitoring by) top-notch physicians, so a new case of hypothyroidism would definitely have been reported as a “serious adverse event” associated with the LCHF diet. And yet, out of 350 closely monitored patients, there were none!

Studies:Along with his early mentors and collaborators, Dr. Phinney was involved in three studies of ketogenic diets in which they measured one or more parameters of thyroid hormone response. The first study involved six subjects on a very low-calorie ketogenic diet (VLCKD) for six weeks, the second evaluated nine men given a weight-maintenance ketogenic diet for 4 weeks, and the third studied 12 adults given a VLCKD with or without exercise training for 4-5 weeks.

In addition, in 2005 Yancy et al. published a study (Nutr & Metab) of 28 diabetics given a LCHF diet for four months, during which their mean TSH values did not change significantly (1.6 to 1.4 uU/L).

So let’s query these data from three perspectives:

1) failure of the thyroid to make enough T4,

2) failure of the liver to turn enough T4 into T3, and

3) markedly improved T3 sensitivity.

Starting with the latest data from Yancy et al. first, if either the thyroid gland or the liver were failing to maintain adequate thyroid hormone effect, TSH should increase. It does not, but this was only measured in one study. Second, if the liver is failing to make enough T3, then TSH and T4 values should rise. In both our 1980 and 1988 reports, T4 went down slightly. And third, in all three studies blood T3 levels went down sharply (from a mean of 151 to 92) but clinical signs and symptoms were not indicative of overt hypothyroidism.

Case in point: Dr. Volek ran some thyroid tests on 14 overweight/obese men whose other results were reported in a 2004 study. Eight of these men consumed a reduced energy ketogenic diet for six weeks and then switched to a low-fat diet for another six weeks. Six other men consumed the low-fat diet first and then switched to a ketogenic diet. Average free T3 concentrations in the 14 individuals were significantly lower after the ketogenic plan than the low-fat diet (3.5 vs 4.2 pmol/L). Regardless of diet order, free T3 concentrations were lower during the ketogenic diet in 13 out of 14 men (see figure). However, despite the lower free T3 levels, the measured resting metabolic rates of these subjects were not different between diets.

And finally, although it was a relatively short 11-day study, Bisschop et al. fed six men weight-maintaining diets containing 85%, 44%, and 2% of energy as carbohydrates. Although TSH and REE did not decline, serum T3 values plummeted, these results again show a disconnect between circulating T3 and REE in the context of a ketogenic diet.

The only viable interpretation of these data is that ketogenic diets markedly increase tissue sensitivity to T3, and thus serum T3 levels decline while the physiological response to T3 remains normal. In this scenario, both the thyroid and the liver have to do far less “work” to maintain a normal thyroid physiologic response. Taking this one step further, why would anyone want to force their thyroid or liver to greater levels of thyroid hormone production by eating lots more carbohydrates? Forcing the pancreas to make more insulin by eating more carbs clearly doesn’t do a lot of good for type 2 diabetics, and we think the same logic applies here for thyroid function.

It’s understandable why some people may be concerned or misled by the changes in thyroid hormones that occur when one adopts a low-carb high-fat lifestyle. Don’t be pressured into eating more carbs than you really need on the mistaken assumption that they are required to maintain normal function of your thyroid gland.

SOURCE: Does Your Thyroid Need Dietary Carbohydrates?by Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD on May 3, 2017

https://blog.virtahealth.com/does-your-thyroid-need-dietary-carbohydrates/

To learn more about Hypothyroidism please read:

  1. Metabolic Syndrome X and Hypothyroidismhttps://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/03/09/metabolic-syndrome-x-and-hypothyroidism/
  1. The Ketogenic Diet for Healthhttp://www.ketotic.org/2014/12/the-effect-of-ketogenic-diets-on.html

Conclusion: There is no evidence that we are aware of indicating that ketogenic diets cause hypothyroid, or negatively impact thyroid function. The fact that T₃is lower in ketogenic dieters is probably part of the mechanism that protects lean mass when fat is being lost. Moreover, low T₃may possibly even be an indicator of a life extending effect, an effect we have suggested elsewhere when examining the cortisol profile of ketogenic dieters.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Metabolic Syndrome X and Hypothyroidism

 
Health - Thyroid, Dr. Tennant newsletter 1
 
In his newsletter 01, Dr. Tennant discusses the causes of a major epidemic, Hypothyroidism.
 
The symptoms of the epidemic, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, heart attacks, depression, etc. are well known.
 
In order to discuss hypothyroidism, we must first discuss Metabolic Syndrome X and iodine deficiency as this understanding is necessary to understand hypothyroidism.
 
Most doctors agree that what is called Metabolic Syndrome X is responsible for most of the illnesses.
 
So what is Metabolic Syndrome X?
The symptoms and features of Metabolic Syndrome X are:
1. Fasting hyperglycemia — diabetes mellitus type 2 or impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or insulin resistance
2. High blood pressure
3. Central obesity (also known as visceral, male-pattern or appleshaped adiposity), overweight with fat deposits mainly around the waist
4. Decreased HDL cholesterol and elevated triglycerides
 
Obesity *
Obesity requires some special attention. When you are bigger around the waist than around your hips, this is called “Apple Obesity”.
 
This type of obesity is associated with illnesses such as heart attacks, strokes, diabetes, gall bladder disease, and cancer. When you are bigger around your hips than around your waist, this is called “Pear Obesity”. This is associated with hormonal imbalances but is not as likely to cause you heart attacks, strokes and cancer.
 
MSG * A major contributor to obesity is MSG. Leptin is a hormone released to tell your brain that you are full. MSG damages the brain so that it does not recognize leptin. Thus you always feel hungry. MSG is put in foods because it is addicting and it makes you want to eat more = more profits for the food manufacturers. MSG is hidden in foods by calling it “other spices”.
 
Additives that always contain MSG
• Monosodium Glutamate
• Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein
• Hydrolyzed Protein
• Hydrolyzed Plant Protein
• Plant Protein Extract
• Sodium Caseinate
• Calcium Caseinate
• Yeast Extract
• Textured Protein
• Autolyzed Yeast
• Hydrolyzed Oat Flour
 
Metabolic Syndrome is an epidemic that also includes stress, anger, heart attacks, ADHD, migraine headaches, and childhood and adult obesity with depression.
 
For the full article please email Lydia at lpolstra@sympatico.ca
 
Jerry Tennant, MD Newsletter Copyright 2008©

Dr. Tennant has been acknowledged by his peers by awarding him the following: AMA:  American Medical Association Physician’s Recognition Award.  Philip Corboy Award for contributions to ophthalmology.  Pope Benedict:  Order of Saint Sylvester Award for Contributions to Medicine.  Microcurrent Society:  Lifetime Achievement Award.  Top 20 Alternative Doctors in America.  Newsmax Health’s Top 100 Physicians Who Embrace Integrative Medicine.   The Academy of Comprehensive Integrative Medicine:  Lifetime Achievement Award.   World Academy of Neural Therapy According To Huneke:  Scientific Excellence Award and others.

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

There are various ways to keep up-to-date on my Posts.

 My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

I invite you to follow my Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/Please click the Follow button. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before the follow button is available. Please Click Like when a Post interests you.

Alternatively, you may wish to follow my Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/or follow on Twitter @LPolstra

If you send me an email at lpolstra@sympatico.caI would be pleased to add you to my email distribution list.

If you are reading this Post in my Blog and wish to contact me, please fill in this form starting with my email address lpolstra@bell.net

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra