Low Carb Guide to Understanding Nutrition Labelsx

Have you ever looked on the back of a food package, only to find ingredients you can’t pronounce and hidden sugars you didn’t expect? For success on your path to better health through a low carbohydrate, high fat nutrition plan, it’s important that you learn what to look for on packaged food labels.

First and foremost: the Ketogenic diet is not a low calorie or low fat way of eating. It is a low carbohydrate, high fat and moderate protein nutrition plan, so while there are many things to be aware of when reading labels, total carbohydrate content is the most important.

Let’s walk through reading a Nutrition Facts label, from top to bottom.

Here’s a label for some roasted almonds.

Blog - Food Label
  1. Serving Size and Servings Per Container

The first thing you’ll see is the serving size. This is the portion of that particular food that all the other numbers – grams of fat, protein, carb, etc. – are based on.

The servings per container is the number of servings contained in the entire bag, box, can, bottle, or jar. It’s important to know the serving size and how many servings there are per container so you don’t inadvertently go over your carb limit for the day. For example, for most nuts, a typical serving is one ounce.

For sliced deli meats, a serving might be 3–4 slices. Salad dressings are usually 2 Tbsp.; other condiments are just 1 Tbsp. per serving. Even if the carb count for one serving is low, the carbs can add up quickly if you eat multiple servings.

  1. Calories

A ketogenic diet is not a low calorie plan. There’s no calorie counting. Instead, it’s far more important to keep track of carbohydrates.

Learn more about the low carb Ketogenic diet https://www.virtahealth.com/faq/ketosis-ketogenic-diet-faq

  1. Total Fat

When you’re in nutritional ketosis, fat is fuel and with this high fat nutrition plan you need not fear fat or worry about counting fat grams – not even saturated fat. The amount of fat varies for individuals, but instead of counting grams of fat, it should be consumed to satiety.

 Also, the type of fat matters; most should come from monounsaturated and saturated fat sources. Some labels break the fat down into different types of fat. Food sources of fat contain a mix of different fats, but here’s a general overview:

Saturated: found predominantly in dairy products (butter, cheese, cream) and other animal sources (beef, pork). Some plant oils, such as coconut and palm, are also rich in saturated fat. Read more on saturated fat here. To learn more please read The Sad Saga of Saturated Fat https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2019/02/01/the-sad-saga-of-saturated-fat/

Monounsaturated: found in olive oil, avocados, nuts, and also in animal sources (beef, pork, poultry)

Polyunsaturated: found in nuts and seeds, fatty fish, and vegetable oils (soybean, corn, safflower, cottonseed, sunflower)

Trans: found in vegetable shortening (Crisco), margarine, and mass-produced processed foods (cookies, crackers, muffins).

By eating a wide variety of foods, you will naturally consume a blend of all three natural fats: saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated. You should aim to get most of your fats as monounsaturated and saturated.

Despite consuming a higher percentage of your dietary intake from fat during a well-formulated ketogenic diet, the total amount of polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) that your body needs each day does not change. So consuming sources high in omega-6 PUFA like corn and soybean oils can result in an imbalance in the body and cause poor gastrointestinal tolerance.

It’s fine to get PUFA from natural sources, such as fish, and nuts, and small amounts of vegetable oils in the form of dressings, mayonnaise, etc., are okay on occasion, like when dining out. (Alternatively, you may decide to take a small container of olive oil with you when you plan to eat out.)

At home be sure to stock up on dressings and mayos made with olive oil. Artificial trans fats should be limited as much as possible or eliminated altogether. They are not natural fats and are linked to an increase in the risk of heart disease. Learn more at https://www.heartandstroke.ca/get-healthy/healthy-eating/the-facts-on-trans-fats

Since they are mostly found in foods that do not fit into a ketogenic diet (packaged high-carb snack foods) your intake of trans fats will automatically decrease, but be sure to still pay attention to the amount on the label.

  1. Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a fatty substance found only in animal products. Vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fruit contain no cholesterol. You do not need to count cholesterol. Research shows that, for most people, the amount of cholesterol in the foods you eat does not affect the amount of cholesterol in your blood.Egg yolks are welcome at the table again!

  1. Sodium

We get sodium from some of the foods we eat and salt we put on our food. (This Blogger prefers unprocessed sea salt). Sodium is an essential nutrient, and very low-carb diets change the way the body holds onto sodium, so if anything, it’s important that you eat enough sodium, rather than worrying about too much.

Aim for 5g per day: 3g from food and salting your food to taste and an additional 2g from boullion. (Do not limit sodium unless you’re taking medication for high blood pressure or are told to do so by your doctor.)

To learn more about sodium go to

https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2019/09/20/managing-potassium-and-sodium-on-a-ketogenic-diet/

  1. Total Carbohydrate

The carbohydrate count is given as total grams, and then broken down into carbs from fiber and sugar. Focus on total carbohydrate.

Sugar should be zero as often as possible (1–2g at most).

‍Fiber is a carb and should be included in your total for the day (initially 30g or less).

‍Again, pay attention to the serving size. Something might be low in carbs, but if you eat 3 or 4 servings, you can easily go over your daily limit.

  1. Protein

Protein comes from both animal and plant foods and is very important for overall health to preserve critical structures and functions – like muscles, heart, liver, and practically every other part of the body.  Additionally, it helps keep you satisfied and is the building block that powers important chemical reactions in the body. Consuming enough protein every day is critical, but eating too much can interfere with nutritional ketosis. Read about how much protein you need in nutritional ketosis in this Blog Post https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/11/09/how-much-protein-do-you-need-in-nutritional-ketosis/

  1. Vitamins and Minerals

Your individual needs are unique; you need not pay attention to the percentages given here. To make sure you consume enough vitamins and minerals, aim for 5 servings of non-starchy vegetables daily.

  1. % Daily Value

These are percentages of nutrients based on a 2,000 calorie per day diet. Because this is not a calorie-restricted diet, and you may be eating more or less than 2,000 calories, you need not pay attention to these percentages.

  1. Ingredients

On food labels, ingredients are listed in order by weight – the first few ingredients are the main ones in the product, while the ones toward the end of the list are used in smaller amounts. Here are some key things to look out for:

Trans fats: These are chemically modified fats that come from vegetable oils and should be avoided as much as possible. According to labeling laws in the U.S., if a food contains less than 0.5g of trans fat per serving, the label can say 0g, so be sure to read the list of ingredients. You can spot trans fats by the words “hydrogenated” or “partially hydrogenated” with oils.

Sugar-free or Low-carb: Don’t be fooled by clever packaging and slick marketing. Packages that say, “low carb” or “sugar free” may have hidden sugars and many of these that calculate net carbs (the subtraction of fiber and sugar alcohols) are likely high in total carbs. Pay attention to the ingredients and the total carb content, even when the front of the package shows “low carb.”

Vegetable oils: Try to avoid or limit as much as possible foods that list corn, soybean, cottonseed, sunflower, or safflower oil among the first ingredients. Opt for condiments and marinades made from olive oil. (Canola oil may contain small amounts of trans fats, which is harmful to health. Source: Is Canola Oil Healthy? https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/is-canola-oil-healthy)

Hidden sugars: Sugar goes by many different names, which helps manufacturers disguise the true amount of sugars and sweeteners in their products.

The many names of sugar include:

Blog - Feb. 7 sugar chart

If you see any of these listed in the ingredients on a label, look to see if the total carbohydrate count is suitable. For example, many brands of bacon and cold cuts are cured with brown sugar or honey, but the amount of sugar remaining in the final product is very low.

As long as the total carbs per serving are 1–2g, that’s okay.The same goes for salad dressings – many perfectly good low-carb choices, such as ranch or bleu cheese, may have sugar listed in the ingredients, but the total carbs per serving will be just 1–2g.

Bottom line: Carefully read nutrition labels to limit your total carbohydrates and identify the right ingredients to help you successfully navigate your low carb, high fat lifestyle.

To learn more about how food affects blood sugar, watch Dr. Sarah Hallberg’s video here:

Dr. Hallberg on Carbs, Protein and Fat, and Their Surprising Impact on Blood Sugar (Ch 1) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESL3_7sdCwU

This Post has been condensed from: Low Carb Guide to Understanding Nutrition Labels https://www.virtahealth.com/blog/low-carb-guide-to-understanding-nutrition-labels

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Happy Holidays!

Blog image H.holidays.png

I would like to take a moment to thank each of you for your views, likes, shares and comments as response to my Blog, Facebook page and emails. The insight you share in your comments means a lot to me. 

My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 If you are not already a Follower, I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Why Low-Carb Diets May Be Ideal for You – Part Two

Low-carb moderate protein diets can help you shed body fat, improve metabolism, boost energy levels, promote longevity, protect brain function, boost mental clarity, improve physical stamina and endurance, and more. – Dr. Jeff Volek

Blog - picture

Jeff Volek, Ph.D., and registered dietitian and professor in the Human Science Department at Ohio State University, has done enormous work in the field of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets, investigating how it affects human health and athletic performance. Volek has published many scientific articles as well as several books, including “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living,” and “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance.”

Part One of this Post covered the following:

  • Low-Carb Diets Can Benefit Athletes and Non-Athletes Alike
  • Is Your Diet Driving Your Metabolism in the Right Direction?
  • Healthy Fat Is a ‘Cleaner’ Burning Fuel
  • And More.

Finding Your Ideal Carb Level

A level of non-fiber carbs that allows you to enter into nutritional ketosis (a metabolic state associated with an increased production of ketones in your liver; it’s the biological reflection of being able to burn fat) is on average about 50 grams per day or less of digestible carbohydrates. However, we all vary how we respond to the same food, so this is not an exact recommendation.

Some people can be in a full fat-burning state with full ketosis at a level of non-fiber carbs that’s higher than 50 grams; maybe 70 or 80 grams. Others, especially if you’re insulin resistant or have type 2 diabetes, may require less than 40 grams or even 30 grams per day.

To find your personal carb limit, it’s important to actually measure your ketones, which can be done either through urine, breath, or blood. This will tell if you’re truly in ketosis, rather than just counting the grams of carbohydrates you consume.

Research has shown that ketosis is a very safe and a therapeutic metabolic state to be in, especially if you’re diabetic or suffering from carb intolerance.

Ketogenic Diet Can Benefit Many Chronic Health Problems

Beyond insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, there are a number of applications for a well-formulated ketogenic diet, including epileptic seizures, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s and cancer.

“There are multiple reasons why many cancers would benefit from a ketogenic diet, not just the decreased glucose availability influx (which many tumors depend on) but also the lower insulin response and less inflammation, as many tumors thrive in a pro-inflammatory environment.

The principal ketone body, beta hydroxybutyrate, is more than just an alternative fuel for the brain.  It acts like a potent signaling molecule that affects gene expression, including upregulating genes that are protective against oxidative stress and enhance the antioxidant status.”

Other benefits include the resistance to sugar and other food cravings, as you’re never that hungry once you’ve made the shift.

How Ketogenic Diet May Promote Longevity and Increased Muscle Mass

More recent research supports being an efficient fat burner may also predispose you to a longer life. The more fat you burn, the slower you’re going to age.

Ketones spare branched-chain amino acids, leaving higher levels of them around, which promotes longevity and increased muscle mass.

The Importance of Eating Moderate Protein

There’s a common misconception that low non-fiber carb diets are high-protein diets. In reality, a ketogenic diet must actually be moderate in protein. Don’t eat more protein than your body actually needs.

On the other hand, if you consume too little protein that may push your body into a wasting state. As a general rule, eat one-half gram of protein per pound of lean body mass per day, which for most sedentary folks is 40 to 70 grams, but this may be higher for athletes and larger individuals. Here is a link to a Post on how much protein you need https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/11/09/how-much-protein-do-you-need-in-nutritional-ketosis/

Volek says. “I am a general proponent of high-quality protein sources. Most animal sources of protein maintain essential amino acids.

Low-Carb Benefits for Athletes

We were taught that in order to perform at a higher level and recover adequately, athletes need to consume high amounts of (non-vegetable) carbs before, during, and after exercise. However, the understanding of how low-carb diets can increase performance is starting to catch on.

You can only store about 2,000 kilocalories of carbs in your body as glycogen.  You will burn through a majority of it if you’re exercising for more than a couple of hours.

That’s when you hit the wall of diminished performance. To avoid that train your body to more burn fat.

Athletes who adopt this strategy can become exceptionally good at burning fat. Even if they’re not eating calories during exercise, lean athletes have at least 20,000 to 30,000 kilocalories on their body in the form of adipose (fat) tissue that they can access during exercise. Other benefits are: speedier recovery rates, improved metabolic health, and a leaner body composition.

Jeff Volek, Ph.D., and registered dietitian and professor in the Human Science Department at Ohio State University, has done enormous work in the field of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diets, investigating how it affects human health and athletic performance. Volek has published many scientific articles as well as several books, including “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living,” and “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance.”

Both of these books were co-authored with Dr. Stephen Phinney, a physician who has studied low-carb diets even longer than Volek.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

World Renowned Heart Surgeon Speaks Out On What Really Causes Heart Disease.

Blog Oct. picture

Dr. Dwight Lundell is the past Chief of Staff and Chief of Surgery at Banner Heart Hospital, Mesa , AZ. His private practice, Cardiac Care Center was in Mesa, AZ. Recently Dr. Lundell left surgery to focus on the nutritional treatment of heart disease. He is the founder of Healthy Humans Foundation that promotes human health with a focus on helping large corporations promote wellness. He is also the author of The Cure for Heart Disease and The Great Cholesterol Lie.

Dr. Lundell says, as a heart surgeon with 25 years experience, having performed over 5,000 open-heart surgeries, today is my day to right the wrong with medical and scientific fact. I trained for many years with other prominent physicians labeled “opinion makers.” Bombarded with scientific literature, continually attending education seminars, we opinion makers insisted heart disease resulted from the simple fact of elevated blood cholesterol. The only accepted therapy was prescribing medications to lower cholesterol and a diet that severely restricted fat intake. The latter of course we insisted would lower cholesterol and heart disease.

Deviations from these recommendations were considered heresy and could quite possibly result in malpractice.

What follows are the highlights from the video:

World Renowned Heart Surgeon Speaks Out On What Really Causes Heart Disease.

Dr. Lundell observed while doing heart operations that the cornonary artery had a lot of redness and swelling around the plaque area. These are two of the cardinal signs of inflammation.

He began wondering if inflammation was part of the problem. Russell Ross and others published and articles about vascular biology, that proved inflammation was the mechanism behind plaque build up in the arteries.

The cause is not cholesterol. 70% of heart attack patients have normal cholesterol.

Scientific studies after 2006 had more stringent guides and showed that statins do not reduce the risk of heart attack.

Here is a video of one person’s experience with statins World Renowned Heart Surgeon Speaks Out On What Really Causes Heart Disease

Dr. Lundell says that cholesterol is not a marker for heart disease. It is a marker for eating too many carbohydrates because carbohydrate gets turned into triglycerides, which raises your LDL cholesterol. To lower your cholesterol, eat a lot of saturated fats and lower your carbohydrate intake.

Cholesterol is not important. What is important is sugar, that’s carbohydrate.

The 1977 US food guide recommended 60 to 70% of the food intake should be carbohydrates and eliminated saturated fats.

Saturated fat raises LDL cholesterol. If LDL cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease, eliminating saturated that makes no sense.

What is the real cause of heart disease? It is inflammation. Inflammation follows injury. What is causing the injury? It is sugar.

Dr. Michael Brownlee published an article detailing the mechanisms by which sugar damages. The cells in the eyes and the kidneys are different from the rest of the body. They cannot stop sugar or glucose going into their cells so they were damaged more quickly than other cells. Dr. Brownlee wanted to know how these cells were so injured as to cause blindness and kidney disease. He found that injury causes inflammation, and inflammation is the mechanism for heart disease as well as other diseases. But what’s causing the injury?

Sugar is causing it. Sugar molecules combined with protein or fat in a process called glycation. A1c is glycated hemoglobin. The main pathway to inflammation is when the sugar (glucose) gets presented to the mitochondria inside endothelial cell and since it can’t stop sugar coming in it gets damaged. (Endothelial cells normally line blood vessels to maintain vascular integrity and permeability).

When sugar is introduced to the mitochondria it overloads it and produces a whole bunch of extra free radicals, which then caused damages to the cell, which then trigger the inflammation. Plaque as produced as a bandage over the inflammation.

The standard American diet injures the cells every day. It is the main cause of heart disease. Not cholesterol, not salt. It’s sugar.

Other cells can stop glucose sugar from coming in that is the essence of insulin resistance causing diabetes.

If you want to be healthy and control blood sugar, stop eating a standard American diet. Get yourself on a reduced low carbohydrate diet with extra healthy saturated fat and a moderate amount of protein.

Low carbohydrate nutrition is the key to health.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise. 

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

KICK ‘Keto-flu,’ ‘Atkins-flu,’ and ‘adrenal fatigue’

Most of the symptoms that the internet community attributes to ‘Keto-flu,’ ‘Atkins-flu,’ and ‘adrenal fatigue’, insomnia, anxiety, and slow recovery after exercise can be cured by a modest daily supplement of one essential nutrient – sodium (aka salt).

There is no science linking carbohydrate restriction and/or nutritional ketosis to impaired adrenal function (i.e., inadequate cortisol or adrenaline production).

To avoid confusion, we need to differentiate between ‘sodium depletion’ – which triggers the renin/aldosterole pathwaythat reduces sodium excretion – and simple dehydration. Dehydration triggers thirst, which stimulates water consumption. But water consumption alone cannot reverse the symptoms of sodium depletion. Without enough sodium in the body, no amount of water intake can maintain normal volume in the circulation. Dehydration by itself tends to be self-correcting. Sodium depletion are symptoms less specific.

Sodium – Essential But Still Controversial

Sodium.png

Sodium has been recognized for thousands of years as an essential mineral for human well-being and function, but the optimum level of intake for humans remains highly controversial. Sodium intake has been linked to increased blood pressure in about 25% of the general population, and given the strong association between hypertension and cardiovascular disease, the assumption has been that we all should consume less sodium to reduce our heart-attack risk. In other words, we are all told to limit our salt intakes because this is assumed to be benign for most of us and life-saving for the minority with what is called ‘salt-sensitive hypertension.’

We must question this one-size-fits-all recommendation. Why? Because no one has bothered to do the obvious study in which people with normal blood pressure restrict their salt intakes for years at a time to see if this improves their overall health, or at least does them no harm.

The Salt/Sodium Adrenal-Hormone Connection

Eat no salt for more than a few weeks and you die. Don’t eat quite enough salt long term and you will develop symptoms that are the same as those described for ‘adrenal fatigue’, such as weakness, fatigue or low energy, headache, nausea, vomiting, muscle cramps or spasms, confusion and irritability.

Sodium is an essential mineral found in your blood, specifically in your serum, and in the extra-cellular fluid that surrounds all of the body’s cells. Its level in the blood is guarded by the actions of both your kidneys and adrenal glands. Eat too much salt and your kidneys accelerate its excretion.

Eat too little and your adrenals make a hormone called aldosterone that causes your kidneys to conserve sodium, but in doing so they are physiologically obligated to simultaneously waste potassium. Wasting too much potassium is not good because your muscles, heart, and nerves need to contain the right amount of potassium to work properly.

The reduced amount of sodium available in the circulation that triggers the adrenal gland to increase production of aldosterone also increases adrenal production of the stress hormone cortisol and the fight-or-flight hormone adrenaline. Increased cortisol and adrenaline levels are stress hormones that are potent impediments of healthy sleep.

Bottom line: salt, potassium, adrenaline, and cortisol are intimately connected; there is a clear relationship between inadequate dietary sodium and the purported signs of ‘adrenal fatigue.’

How Nutritional Ketosis Affects Your Sodium Needs

With adaptation to nutritional ketosis over a number of weeks, many basic functions of the body undergo profound changes:

  • Fat (and ketones made from fat) replaces glucose as the primary fuel
  • Sensitivity to multiple hormones, including insulin and thyroid hormones, improves
  • The kidneys switch from retaining sodium to rapidly excreting it, (normal sodium metabolism with nutritional ketosis).

For those who are prone to retain sodium (e.g., causing bloating, high blood pressure, congestive heart failure, edema/ankle swelling), this accelerated sodium excretion with nutritional ketosis is a blessing. But once any excess sodium and water have been cleared from the body in the first few weeks of a ketogenic diet, a new balance of sodium intake to sodium excretion then has to occur so that adequate blood circulation (aka, circulating volume) can be maintained. However if, in this keto-adapted state, dietary sodium is restricted, your brain and kidneys signal your adrenals to increase aldosterone and cortisol. What this means is that a combination of nutritional ketosis plus salt restriction leads to adrenal stress.

   Nutritional ketosis + salt restriction = adrenal stress

Research Linking Ketogenic Diets to Adrenal Stress

Despite the hundreds of published studies of humans on ketogenic diets lasting as long as 2 years, there is no credible scientific evidence for adrenal damage or fatigue.

Research Showing Normal Blood Cortisol During Ketogenic Diets

There is just one paper showing that serum cortisol levels remained normal in 12 men given a well-formulated ketogenic diet for 6 weeks (Volek, 2002).

Why It Is Safe to Recommend Adding Salt to a Ketogenic Diet

First,since nutritional ketosis accelerates sodium excretion by the kidneys, whatever risk might be associated with too much sodium at any one level of salt intake would be less during ketosis than when eating a high carb intake. Stated another way, a high carbohydrate intake suppresses the body’s natural ability to excrete sodium and thus reduces a person’s ‘salt tolerance.’ Insulin is known to be involved in renal sodium metabolism.

The second important point is found in a recently published study that threatens to derail the whole anti-salt crusade. An international group of scientists collected urine samples from over 100,000 adults in 17 countries and then observed their health status for 4 years (O’Donnell 2014). They reported that people consuming less than 4 grams of sodium per day had a sharply increasing risk of death, almost doubling when they got down to 2 grams/day of sodium. In contrast, with higher sodium intakes, the risk of death rose very slowly beginning with intakes above 6 grams/day.  For example, as shown in the diagram below, mortality risk was increased by only 15% at 8 grams/day.

See the Chart: ** Estimated sodium excretion and risk of death from any cause

Blog - Sept. 27 chart.png

Optimum Sodium Intake During Nutritional Ketosis

Virta’s recommended sodium intake for most people during a well-formulated ketogenic diet is based upon the amount needed to avoid the symptoms of ‘Atkins flu’ or ‘adrenal fatigue’ is 5 grams per day (3 grams in your food, 2 grams from broth/bouillon).

There are still variations between individuals that necessarily modify this advice.

  • People with high blood pressure or fluid retention that persists after keto-adaptation, and particularly if they are taking a diuretic medication, should not increase their sodium intake above 3 grams per day until these symptoms are resolved and the diuretic medication stopped.
  • People routinely taking NSAID medications like ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) or (Aleve, Naprosyn) are more ‘sodium sensitive’ because these drugs block salt excretion by the kidneys and raise blood pressure.
  • Heavy physical exercise in the heat will cause increased sodium loss in sweat, which can increase one’s daily sodium requirement above the 5-gram level.

And finally, as always, it is important to distinguish between grams of sodium and grams of salt.

    Salt and sodium are not the same.

    1 teaspoon of salt = 5 grams of salt = 2.3 grams of sodium (the rest is chloride)

High quality studies published by Virta and others continues to lead us to the scientifically correct view: nutritional ketosis is good for you. In particular, given the emerging view of ketones as both a fuel and beneficial epigenetic signal (arising from nongenetic influences on gene expression), there is unique therapeutic value to nutritional ketosis. And all that is needed to capture these benefits is to supply the  daily salt intake required to maintain an optimum balance of sodium and potassium in the body.

    Ask yourself this question: if nutritional ketosis has been shown to markedly increase my defense against oxidative stress, and it also makes mice and worms live 13-26% longer, why would I give up these advantages just so I could eat sugar and refined carbs?

This Post has been condensed from: Sodium, Nutritional Ketosis, and Adrenal Function

By Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, Jeff Volek, PhD, RD, Citations for scientific studies.

https://blog.virtahealth.com/sodium-nutritional-ketosis-keto-flu-adrenal-function/

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise. 

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

 To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

How Much and When Can You Have Fruit?

Blog Aug. 30 picture.png

First How Much Fruit?

Dr. Phinney, MD, PhD says, how much fruit you can have on a Ketogenic Diet depends on what the person’s goals are and if somebody is not diabetic but has some degree of underlying insulin resistant and they’re overweight and they want to lose weight.

Being adapted to nutritional ketosis we call keto adaptation, the keto adaptation process gives your body permission to burn fat at twice the rate that if you’re not keto adapted.

So adding in the fruit, if it takes you out of nutritional ketosis, it basically revokes your permission to burn fat at the higher rate. You can still lose weight by restricting but it’s it typically is harder to do.

So it really depends on the person’s goals but if that person has achieved the weight they want to get to and they want to add melon and avocado and tomatoes in greater quantities, because we called those berry fruit even though they’re not all berries. If you’re holding your weight stable and you’re healthy and you’re blood parameters are good, add them in. But it has to be individualized. It can’t be cookie cutter per say, well it at eight months you can add in a cup of blueberries. No, we can’t say that. Four ounces of blueberries is 14 Net Carbs, for some it may be enough to take them out of ketosis.

A highly recommended free keto-app is Carb Manager. Here is the link https://www.carbmanager.com/

Dr. Hallberg, DO, MS says our goal is we want to help each and every person find their personal carbohydrate tolerance.  In the same person even their personal carbohydrate tolerance may be different at point A than it is for point B once they’ve gotten healthier. But it’s figuring that out when you start and then maybe when you’re in transitioning into long-term success, it is so important to work with a coach.  Source: Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD and Dr. Hallberg, DO, MS on how much fruit you can have on a ketogenic diet? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T07gsNTcXKA

Want to learn more about the Ketogenic diet? Please read the book written by Drs. Phinney, MD, PhD and Volek PhD, RD, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable https://www.amazon.ca/Art-Science-Low-Carbohydrate-Living/dp/0983490708

Second When To Eat Fruit?

What about combing fruit with other food?According to Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, MD, MMedSci (neurology), MMedSci (human nutrition), who developed the GAPS  (Gut and Psychology/Physiology Syndrome) Diet says, it is not a good idea to have raw fruit with vegetables as a fruit may interfere with the digestion of meats. The fruits that do combine with meats fairly well our lemons, fresh lemon juice, avocado and sour taste in varieties of apple. Fruit should be ripe, as unripe fruit has too much starch. For example, bananas have to have brown spots on their skins. Almost all fruit and vegetables contain minute amounts of starch, which is not an issue for the majority (even for people with damaged gut), but all really starchy foods are out of the GAPS Diet. Source: Page 135 of her book.

Here is the link https://www.amazon.com/Psychology-Syndrome-D-D-D-H-D-Schizophrenia/dp/0954852028

Raymond Francis D.Sc., M.Sc., RNC has been called a “brilliant advanced thinker” and has been cited as “one of the few scientists who has achieved a breakthrough understanding of health and disease.”  https://raymondfrancisauthor.com/raymond-francis/

Raymond has this to say about combing fruit with other foods.  Fruit has special digestive requirements and should be eaten alone. Fruit is easy to digest and is meant to pass through the digestive system quickly. If not, such as when combined with protein or starch, the fruit sugar ferments in the stomach, often manifested by bloating and gas. If sweet and acid fruits are to be eaten together, eat the acid fruits first.

Melons should be eaten alone or combined with other melons because they take even less time to digest than other fruits and should pass quickly through your digestive system in order to prevent sugar fermentation.

Here is a link to his book, Never Be Sick Again, https://www.amazon.com/Never-Be-Sick-Again-Health/dp/1558749543

It is the opinion of this Blogger, that food combing is controversial. But I am not going to risk bloating and gas, so I am going to eat my fruit by itself and on an empty stomach.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Low Carb Grocery Shopping Guide with GAPS Recommendations.

Low Carb Grocery Shopping Guide with GAPS Recommendations

Blog - shopping.png

To succeed on your diet you need to start with a list of acceptable foods. See the tips and grocery list for a low carb or ketogenic lifestyle. For people (like me) who are following the Full GAPS diet as well, foods that are not permitted have been deleted or have a GAPS notation.

Grocery Shopping Tips

  1. Establish a routine — and stick to it

Stock up on essentials to avoid trips to the store.

Ensure your weekly shopping is always done by blocking out time that works best in you.

  1. Always shop with a grocery list

Plan meals and snacks for the week (or more) before shopping to make sure you buy everything you need.

Stick to your list so you will avoid temptations.

  1. Avoid shopping on an empty stomach

If you shop hungry, you may be tempted and suffer the consequences of a lapse.

  1. Focus on the perimeter of the store

The perimeter has non-starchy vegetables, berries, eggs, dairy, meat, fish and poultry.

Skip the inner aisles with processed carbs like chips and cookies.

Fresh fruit and vegetables is preferred but the next best frozen.

Shop inner aisle only for the diet-friendly condiments and oils, etc.

  1. Think twice about specialty “low carb” and “sugar-free” products

While a ketogenic lifestyle might include occasional low carb specialty products, the majority of your grocery bounty should be minimally processed, whole, nourishing foods.

When in doubt, read the nutrition label and ingredients list to make sure a product won’t derail your progress toward your health goals.

  1. Take advantage of online shopping

No time. Most chain grocery stores offer curbside pickup or home delivery services.

Use a saved or “Favorite” list on their shopping platform ahead of time to make ordering easier.

Key Items to Add to Your Grocery List

Produce

Asparagus

Avocado

Berries (strawberry, raspberry, blueberry, blackberry)

Beans (green, yellow, wax)

Bok choy

Broccoli

Brussels sprouts

Cabbage

Cauliflower

Celery

Cucumber

Eggplant

Garlic

Green beans

Greens, collard

Greens, spinach

Kale

Lemons

Limes

Lettuce (Romaine, arugula, spring mix, iceberg, endive, escarole)

Mushrooms

Onions

Peppers (green, red, orange/yellow)

Snow peas

Spaghetti squash

Tomatoes

Zucchini/summer squash

Meat, Fish and Poultry – Free Range if possible

Bacon*

Beef steaks

Deli meat (cured meats, e.g., salami and prosciutto) * GAPS: Look for a source that makes it from free-range meats and chemical free.

Canned tuna, salmon –  Try Vital Choice for mercury-free https://www.vitalchoice.com/#smile-home

Chicken (opt for skin on)

Fish

Ground beef (opt for 12% fat or greater)

Lamb

Pancetta

Pork steaks and chops

Sausage

Shrimp and shellfish

Turkey

Wild game (e.g, bison, deer, elk)

* Always scan the nutrition label, these often contain starchy fillers and/or added sugars.

Dairy Section

GAPS has recommendations for dairy to support intestinal health:

Asiago cheese Yes      May be used occasionally.

Blue cheese      Yes      May be used occasionally.

Brick cheese    Yes      May be used freely.

Brie cheese      Yes      May be used occasionally.

Camembert cheese      Yes      May be used occasionally.

Cheddar cheese, mild, medium, Yes Use freely

Cheddar cheese, sharp            Yes      May be used occasionally.

Colby cheese    Yes      May be used freely.

Cottage cheese, uncreamed (dry curd)           Yes      May be used freely.

Cream cheese  No

Edam cheese   Yes      May be used occasionally.

Eggs – Yes      Free-range.

Gorgonzola cheese      Yes      May be used occasionally.

Gouda cheese  Yes      May be used occasionally

Gruyere cheese            Yes      May be used freely.

Half and half – No

Havarti cheese            Yes      May be used freely.

Heavy cream – No

Limburger Cheese       Yes      May be used occasionally.

Manchego cheese        Yes

Monterey Jack cheeseYes      May be used occasionally.

Muenster cheese         Yes      May be used occasionally.

Natural cheeses          Yes

Parmesan cheese        Yes      May be used occasionally. Grate it, check to endure no added milk solids. You make your own crisps.

Port du Salut cheese   Yes      May be used occasionally.     

Provolone cheese        Yes      Although not listed with the other cheeses on page 140 of Breaking the Vicious Cycle, provolone cheese is legal.

Romano cheese           Yes      May be used occasionally.

Roquefort cheese        Yes      May be used occasionally.

Sour cream – No

Stilton cheese  Yes      May be used occasionally

Swiss cheese   Yes      May be used freely.

Yogurt – No, Make you own if possible. See the GAPS book for the recipe.

 Nuts And Seeds

Almonds

All natural peanut and almond butter*

Macadamia nuts

Peanuts*

Pecans

Pistachios

Sunflower seeds

Pumpkin seeds

Walnuts

*Look for ‘natural’ nut butters with no added sugar and avoid those containing hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils. Peanuts have a higher carb content than some other nut options, so proceed with caution when it comes to portion sizes.

Oils/Cooking Fats, Salad Dressings and Mayonnaise

* Avoid added sugar and additives by making your own salad dressings from oils with higher saturated and monounsaturated fat contents, such as olive, or avocado oil.

Oils:

Avocado oil

Beef tallow

Butter

Canola oil – GAPS, not recommended.

Coconut oil

Ghee

Lard

Olive oil, extra virgin

Palm oil

Safflower oil, high oleic

Miscellaneous Extras:

Almond flour

Almond milk (unsweetened)

Bouillon cubes – GAPS, not recommended.

Coconut flour

Coconut milk

Condiments: Ketchup, BBQ sauce, etc. (check the labels for sugar and chemicals)

Pork rinds

Sugar-free gelatin

Xanthan gum

Source:

  1. Low Carb Grocery Shopping Guide (Grocery List Print Out is in the website)

Anna Barnwell, MPH, MSW  Anna Barnwell, MPH, MSW on August 6, 2018

https://blog.virtahealth.com/low-carb-keto-grocery-shopping/

  1. Breaking the Vicious Cycle™ Legal­‐Illegal List (for GAPS and SCD) http://media.btvc.webfactional.com/media/editor_uploads/2013/11/btvc_legalillegal_list.pdf

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise. 

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader

How to Travel While Staying Keto/ Low Carb

For many people, traveling often leads to cheating on their ketogenic diet. With increased exposure to carbohydrates and difficulty finding low-carb, high fat alternatives, it may seem like too much of a hassle to stick to your ketogenic efforts.

Blog Jun 28 toss.png

But by preparing for your trip by following these tips, traveling while eating keto will be much easier than you think!

  1. Keep it simple

Sticking to the basics can help you stick to your goals. The more you prepare for your upcoming trip, the easier it will be to stay low carb. Eat simple foods like veggies and small amounts of meat.

  1. Plan ahead

Have a meal before you leave the house, bring along some backup snacks, and seek out low carb options from restaurants, convenience stores, and perhaps some unexpected places like drug stores. Seeking out low carb options will get easier over time!

Before leaving for your trip, scope out the food scene. Most restaurants have their menus available online. If you’re traveling somewhere more remote, make sure to bring along snacks.

Here are a few great ketogenic snacks you can bring with you on the go:

Hard-boiled eggs

Cheese

Cooked bacon

Parmesan cheese crisps

Nuts (macadamia nuts, walnuts, and almonds)

Nut butters

Dark chocolate (85% cacao or higher)

Beef jerky (check the sugar content first)

Fat bombs

Buy the most appealing “keto snacks” from Amazon.

Bring along dressing (in a small container), salt, and snacks that don’t require refrigeration, or bring a small cooler and ice pack with snacks and drinks that need to be kept cold.

If you’re traveling to visit family or friends, make sure to be open about your goals ahead of time so they have an opportunity to support your food choices.

While visiting supply as much of your own food as you can by doing a grocery run after arrival, or packing it in the car for the road trip. If you have options to where to stay, try for a place where you can cook. If you are going to friend’s home for cookouts, tell them you will be bringing something. Make enough to share. If they know you are doing this program, they will be relieved they don’t need to worry about you.

Before you leave your home eat a large meal before you leave. Make it is a fairly large, nutrient-dense ketogenic meal. If you’re leaving in the morning, making a quick steak and eggs breakfast along with an avocado will ensure you have the proper amounts of healthy protein and fats to power you through much of your day.

If you have an early morning flight, eat a protein and fat filled breakfast like eggs and bacon, then consider fasting until your supper meal.

Utilize Intermittent Fasting. Intermittent fasting will make staying in ketosis a breeze while you’re traveling. Consider just having two big meals. You will experience deeper levels of ketosis and it helps you cut out all  the tempting junk food and snacks.

Put some ready low carb foods in your refrigerator and freezer for when you come home.

  1. Ask for what you want

It is challenging when people do not understand why you doing the diet. Explain why you’re committed to a low-carb lifestyle. The more people understand why you’re making the choices you are, the more likely they’ll be to support them.

Check out the restaurant menu online before going out. Choose the place that offers ketogenic-friendly meal options.

When dining out, don’t be afraid to ask for modifications. Most restaurants will be accommodating since they want your business.  And with a little creativity, you should be able to eat a healthy low carb, high fat meal no matter where you decide to eat.

Blog June...png

Here are a few tips for eating keto at restaurants:

Always ask to double up on vegetables instead of having bread or a starch

Use olive oil and vinegar as dressing

Ask for butter to place onto your vegetables

If you want a burger, ask the server to have it lettuce wrapped instead of in a bun

Ask for grilled meats with vegetables and a fat like guacamole.

Drink water instead of soda

Skip dessert

Buy low carb foods at the local grocery store. Browse the Internet for any local “health food stores”, they are most likely to carry ketogenic-friendly snacks and meals.

Stock up on low carb, high fat snacks to put in the fridge where you are staying. Fresh meat such as rotisserie chicken can help you stay on your diet.

Here are a few other options you can get at the food store during your trip:

Rotisserie chicken

Egg

Chicken wings (unbreaded)

Salad (don’t mix dressing until ready to eat)

Bacon

Full-fat yogurt

Hummus

Cheese

Tuna

Drink Keto Coffee to prevent hunger. Bringing MCT oil, coconut oil or butter with you and making a “keto coffee” is a great travel hack. By adding healthy fats into your coffee, you’ll stay satiated for longer periods of time, improve your ketone production, and it’ll make it easier for you to hit your daily healthy fat intake.

If you can’t find any low-carb alternatives at the place you’re staying, a quick keto coffee followed by a healthy protein source can help you stay in ketosis and keep carb cravings at bay.

  1. Move past lapses

Even when we try our best, sometimes we go a bit off plan. Don’t beat yourself up. Just get right back on track.

  1. Enjoy yourself!

Trips and vacations are meant to be enjoyed. Focus on spending time with friends and family. Take them on a hike or walk to explore the area.

Travel is fun. Just do your best and remember to eat a little extra fat when you can to help you feel full and curb cravings. Make the most of your adventure and safe travels!

This Post has been condensed from theses sources.

Source: https://blog.virtahealth.com/low-carb-keto-travel/

Source: How to Travel While Staying Keto  https://www.carbmanager.com/article/how-to-travel-while-staying-keto-36a2e61b-e979-1b07-2b23-0170768591f2 

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Keto: The Best Fatty Liver Diet

The ketogenic diet is a good diet for reversing nonalcoholic liver disease. It is improved by following these guidelines:

  1. Restrict Carbohydrates to 5% of Your Daily Calories
  2. Eat High-Fiber Foods With Every Meal
  3. Eat Liver Healing Foods such as oily fish, nuts avocado and olive oil.
  4. Use Liver Healing Supplements such as spirulina, betaine, milk thistle and probiotics.
  5. Limit Alcohol Consumption
  6. Exercise Everyday – brisk walks, resistance training.

There are two main types of fatty liver disease:

  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NFLD)
  • Alcoholic fatty liver disease (alcoholic steatohepatitis)

There are five conditions that are commonly associated with NFLD: type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, dyslipidemia (abnormally elevated cholesterol levels), and metabolic syndrome. Scientists believe that they are intimately linked because they can all be caused by a combination of lifestyle, genetics, and gut health issues.

In epidemiological studies including people with type 2 diabetes, 62 to 69% of them also had NFLD. Another study found that 50% of patients with dyslipidemia (abnormally elevated cholesterol levels) had NFLD.

Blog June 14 Liver image.png

NFLD usually causes no signs and symptoms. When it does, they may include:

  • Enlarged liver
  • Fatigue
  • Pain in the upper right abdomen

Possible signs and symptoms of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis (advanced scarring) include:

  • Abdominal swelling (ascites)
  • Enlarged blood vessels just beneath the skin’s surface
  • Enlarged breasts in men
  • Enlarged spleen
  • Red palms
  • Yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice)

What Causes Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?

  1. Lifestyle – Eating Too Much and Exercising Too Little
  • Insulin resistance is a common side effect of eating too much and exercising too little, and it is one of the main reasons why fat builds up in the liver.Many researchers agree that improving insulin sensitivity is a key strategy in the treatment of NFLD.
  • The quickest way to increase fat build up in the liver is by overfeeding on carbohydrates.Fructose, especially, will lead to the most fat accumulation in the liver.
  1. Genetics — Gene Variants, Gender, and Ethnicity
  • Genetics can play a role in the development of NFLD. It is important to develop healthy lifestyle habits if your parents and grandparents struggled with NFLD.
  1. Gut Health Issues — Your Microbiome and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
  • Studies done on the microbiome of obese patients have increased abundance of the bacteria called Firmicutes. This increase leads to an increase in lipopolysaccharide absorption that triggers a potent inflammatory response in the body.

Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis – When The Bad Gets Worse

The increase in lipopolysaccharides absorption caused by a poor diet and an obesity-causing microbiome can disrupt the liver so much that NFLD progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

This form of NFLD affects 20-30% of patients with NFLD, and it occurs when the build up of fat in the liver leads to inflammation that can result in liver cell damage.

The fat cells eventually become overloaded and begin to secrete inflammatory cytokines. These inflammatory cytokines increase inflammation levels and cause reactive oxygen species to accumulate (oxidative stress). As poor lifestyle choices continue, so much fat builds up in the liver that it leads to lipotoxicity (accumulation of fat in non-fat cells). The combination of lipotoxicity and oxidative stress can cause hormonal disturbances and liver damage.

In the gut NFLD promoting lifestyle changes the microbiome. This increases inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipopolysaccharide absorption, which causes more liver damage.

You are not doomed to get nonalcoholic steatohepatitis because like type 2 diabetes, obesity, and heart disease, NFLD is reversible with the same lifestyle changes.

How To Reverse Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

The key to disrupting the vicious cycle of NFLD before it damages the liver is exercise and diet.

Many scientific papers agree that the treatment of NFLD should be focused on controlling diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. We should only focus on treating the liver in those with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

This means that the best way to reverse NFLD and prevent liver damage is with a diet that has been proven to control diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia.

The Ketogenic Diet May Be The Best Fatty Liver Diet

Weight loss is essential when reversing NFLD. The best way to achieve this weight loss, however, is not with caloric restriction.

The ketogenic diet has been proven to be more effective than a calorie-restricted diet at reversing type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, hyperlipidemia and NFLD.

A recent pilot study put five patients on the ketogenic diet (less than 20 grams per day of carbohydrate). Each patient underwent a liver biopsy, and four of the five patients showed a reduction in liver fat, inflammation, and fibrosis. This provides preliminary evidence that the ketogenic diet can reverse NFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

NFLD is so intimately associated with type 2 diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease that it is believed to be caused by the same factors. These factors are an unhealthy lifestyle, genetics, and gut health issues (an obesity and inflammation causing microbiome).

The combination of the ketogenic diet and exercise makes a great treatment for NFLD.

This Post has been condensed from the Keto: The best Fatty Liver Diet https://www.ruled.me/keto-best-fatty-liver-diet/

To learn more please read, How Do I Do the Ketogenic Diet? https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/04/13/how-do-i-do-the-ketogenic-diet/

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Ketone Supplements: The Pros and Cons

Blog June 7 image.png

Ketone supplements rapidly and transiently increase blood concentrations of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB). There is a flurry of new studies being reported, some positive, some neutral and some negative.

The different forms (salts vs. esters), what they are co-ingested with (carbohydrates vs no carbs, minerals), the background diet (ketogenic vs. high-carb), and dosing, timing, and adaptation periods are just a few of the important factors that may determine the metabolic responses to ketone supplements.

In preparation for this Post it is helpful to first understand: Keto-Adaptation. Here is the link.  https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2019/05/31/keto-adaptation-some-clues-to-its-complexity/

Ketones refer to the primary circulating fatty acid metabolites beta-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) and acetoacetate (AcAc). More on ketone basics herehttps://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2019/03/15/drs-stephen-phinney-and-jeff-volek-on-the-basic-science-of-ketosis-and-keto-adaptation/

Shedding light on new methods of achieving ketosis:

  • Exogenous ketones (ketone supplements) and well-formulated ketogenic diets should not be assumed to have equivalent effects simply because they achieve similar BOHB blood levels.
  • For the past few million years, the only way for humans to make use of ketones for fuel was to restrict carbohydrates low enough and long enough to induce the liver to make them. An emerging alternative is to consume ketones as a dietary supplement.

Sources and Formulations of Exogenous Ketones

  • The source of most exogenous ketone supplements is chemical synthesis, which focuses on BOHB.
  • An important difference between endogenous (produced by your liver) and exogenous BOHB is that most synthetic BOHB used in dietary supplements is a mixture of the two ‘D’ and ‘L’ isomers, whereas endogenously produced BOHB consists of just the D-isomer. Metabolically, the two isomers are very different, and current published information indicates that most of the energy and signaling benefits of BOHB derive from the D-form. This is potentially problematic because the L-isomers are not metabolized via the same chemical pathways as the D-forms and it remains unclear whether humans can convert the L-form to the D-form.
  • Thus, while the L-isomers do not appear to be toxic, they are not likely to impart the same benefits as the D-forms.

Ketone Salts and Esters are two general formulations for dietary BOHB supplements – salts derived from the keto-acid or an ester formed between the keto-acid and an alcohol.

Ketone Salts: Salts typically utilize sodium, potassium, calcium, or magnesium. Given that recommended daily intakes of these various minerals range from a few hundred milligrams up to 5 grams, whereas the daily ketone intake goal to mimic nutritional ketosis blood levels would need to be on the order of 50 grams, achieving this goal with ketone salts would severely challenge human dietary mineral tolerance.

Most of the currently marketed ketone salt formulations are made with a mix of the D- and L-isomers of BOHB, so the actual delivered dose of the more desirable D-isomer is considerably less. The other concern with the salt formulations is that, as the salts of weak acids, they have an alkalinizing metabolic effect that might have a modest but cumulative effect on blood pH and renal function.

Ketone Esters are more appropriate for delivering higher doses of BOHB, but with repeated dosing can push the limits of taste and GI tolerance (loose bowels). This product has been shown to significantly reduce appetite after a single dose but its effect on body weight in humans over a longer period of time has not been studied, nor has its effect on blood glucose control been reported in humans with type 2 diabetes.

Comparison of ketone supplements (chemical ketosis) to nutritional ketosis

 The stimulus for the increase in ketones in response to a well-formulated ketogenic diet is the restriction of dietary carbohydrate, which triggers many favorable adaptations. Although both induce a form of ketosis, the lack of carbohydrate restriction in the context of using ketone supplements induces a different metabolic profile.

The blood levels of BOHB that can be achieved with the salts or ester formulations are in the 1-3 mM range, similar to what can be achieved with a well-formulated ketogenic diet in insulin sensitive humans. In more insulin resistant humans, the ester formulation may deliver higher blood levels than a sustainable diet.

In terms of epigenetic signaling, at levels of BOHB as low as 1 mM have potent effects. Furthermore, the association between very mild ketonemia (concentration of ketone bodies in the blood) and reduced coronary mortality with SGLT2 inhibitor use in patients with type 2 diabetes suggests that there might be clinical benefits with chronic BOHB levels as low as 0.3 mM.

That said, there also remains the question of the relative benefits of AcAc versus BOHB. AcAc generated in the liver acts as a NAD+ electron donor for the peripheral (aka non-liver), whereas pure BOHB taken orally potentially deprives the periphery of NAD+.

Another factor to consider is that in nutritional ketosis the liver makes a steady supply of ketones and continuously releases them into the circulation. In contrast, most ketone supplement protocols involve bolus intakes that don’t mimic the endogenous release pattern. The extent to which this impacts metabolic and signaling responses across different tissues remains unclear.

Some of the benefits of nutritional ketosis can be attributed to circulating levels of BOHB, and some of these benefits can accrue at blood levels at or even below 0.5 mM.

Practical Considerations in Prevention and Management of Chronic Disease

  • Until there is more definitive information, it will be difficult to specify the dosing and duration of supplemental ketones. However for fuel use, and very likely for exercise performance as well, sustained blood levels of BOHB in the range of 0.5 mM to 1.0 mM are likely to be required. This is achieved physiologically by an estimated ketone production of 50-100 grams per day in a keto-adapted human.
  • With the current ketone salt formulations, even 50 grams per day is likely above taste and physiologic mineral tolerances. So for these products, their potential benefits are likely limited to adding to existing blood ketone levels for someone already following a low carbohydrate diet.
  • For the ketone esters, on the other hand, repeated doses of 20-30 grams in any one day may be possible. Thus these products may be able to maintain a modest level of ketonemia without dietary carbohydrate restriction. Thus some of the cardiac and brain fueling benefits may follow, not to mention the epigenetic effects limiting oxidative stress and inflammation. But given the recent observation that administered ketone esters markedly reduce circulating free fatty acids – their sustained use in people with underlying insulin resistance may compromise their long-term benefits by promoting weight gain unless combined with carbohydrate restriction.
  • A drawback to the long-term use of ketone supplements is their poor palatability for the esters and their cost of about $1 per gram of delivered ketones for daily dosages from 25 to 100 grams.

Sports Performance:  There are enticing anecdotes of supplemental ketones being used to boost human physical performance in competitive events, notably among elite cyclists. Given that BOHB can deliver more energy per unit of oxygen consumed than either glucose or fatty acids, this makes sense. But what we do not know is if there is any required period of adaptation to the use of exogenous ketones, and thus how to employ them in training. It is clear that exogenous ketones decrease adipose tissue lipolysis and availability of fatty acids, the exact opposite to what happens on a well-formulated ketogenic diet. This distinction between exogenous ketones and ketogenic diets on adipose tissue physiology and human energy balance underscores an important reason why these two ketone-boosting strategies should not be conflated.

This Post has been condensed from the Virta Post, Ketone Supplements: The Pros and Cons – Shedding light on new methods of achieving ketosis by Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD and Jeff Volek, PhD, RD on March 12, 2018 https://blog.virtahealth.com/ketone-supplements/

More scientific information and Citations of the supporting studies are included in the Virta post.

Personally, I took ketone supplements for years. I finally lost the unwanted weight off and kept a healthy body fat percentage with the Ketogenic diet.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.