Food Allergy By Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride

Food allergies have become very common. Quite often the person is not sure what food produces the reaction, because the reaction may be immediate or delayed.

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Food allergy or intolerance can produce migraines, fatigue, PMS, painful joints, itchy skin to depression, hyperactivity, hallucinations, obsessions and other psychiatric and neurological manifestations. However, the most immediate and common symptoms in the vast majority of patients are digestive problems: pain, diarrhoea or constipation, urgency, bloating, indigestion, etc.

In some cases, elimination of a trigger food helps. However, the majority of patients find, that as they eliminate some foods, they start reacting to other foods, to which they did not seem to react before. The whole process leads to a situation where the person finishes up with virtually nothing left to eat.

We need to look deeper, at what causes these food intolerances. In order to understand it, I would like to share a case history of one of my patients.

Stephanie S, 35 years old asked for my help in “sorting out her food allergies”. A very pale malnourished looking lady, (weight 45 kg with height 160cm) with low energy levels, chronic cystitis, abdominal pains, bloating and chronic constipation. She was consistently diagnosed anaemic all her life.

We have to look deeper and find the course of the patient’s malady. In order to do that we have to examine Stephanie’s health history.

Stephanie had to take a long course of antibiotics for acne at the age of 16. That is when she got pronounced digestive problems: constipation, bloating, abdominal pain and lactose intolerance, indicating that her gut flora got seriously compromised.

From the age of 14 Stephanie has been taking contraceptive pills for many years. Contraceptives have a serious damaging effect on the composition of gut flora, leading to allergy and other problems, related to gut dysbiosis (microbial imbalance).

And when this gut flora is damaged despite adequate nutrition we develop vitamin deficiencies. Restoring the beneficial bacteria in their gut is the best way to deal with those deficiencies, particularly vitamin B deficiencies.

For Stephanie’s complete history please visit the website http://www.gaps.me/food-allergy.php

Let us discuss some of Stephanie’s complaints.

Anaemia – Patients like Stephanie cannot absorb essential vitamins and minerals from food. On top of that people with damaged gut flora often have a particular group of pathogenic (potentially disease causing)bacteria growing in their gut, which are iron-loving bacteria, which consume dietary iron, leaving the person deficient. Unfortunately, supplementing iron makes these bacteria multiply rapidly, bringing unpleasant digestive problems and does not remedy anaemia. It has been shown in a large number of studies all over the world, that just supplementing iron does not do much for anaemia.

The pathogens in the gut –    Unfortunately, every course of broad – spectrum antibiotics removes the good bacteria, which leaves Clostridia uncontrolled and allows it to grow. Different species of Clostridia cause severe inflammation of the digestive system and damage its integrity, leading to many digestive problems and food intolerances.

Food “allergies” and intolerances –    Normal gut flora maintains gut wall integrity through protecting it, feeding it and insuring normal cell turnover. When the beneficial bacteria in the gut are greatly reduced, the gut wall degenerates. At the same time various opportunists, when not controlled by damaged good bacteria, get access to the gut wall and damage its integrity, making it porous and “leaky”. Partially digested foods gets through the damaged “leaky” gut wall into the blood stream, where the immune system recognises them as foreign and reacts to them.

This is how food allergies or intolerances develop. So, there is nothing wrong with the food. What is happening is that foods do not get a chance to be digested properly before they are absorbed through the damaged gut wall. So, in order to eliminate food allergies we need to concentrate on the gut wall. In my clinical experience, when the gut wall is healed many food intolerances disappear.

How do we heal the gut wall?     The most important intervention is the appropriate diet. A very effective diet with more than 60 years of an excellent record of helping people with all sorts of digestive disorders, including such devastating ones as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This diet is called Specific Carbohydrate Diet or SCD for short.

Dr. Haas treated over 600 patients with excellent results: after following his dietary regimen for at least a year there was “complete recovery with no relapses, no deaths, no crisis, no pulmonary involvement and no stunting of growth”.

Elaine Gottschall, desperate to help her little daughter, who suffered from severe ulcerative colitis and neurological problems, went to see Dr. Haas in 1958. After 2 years on SCD her daughter was completely free of symptoms, an energetic and thriving little girl.

Over the years I have developed a GAPS Introduction Diet for the more severe end of the spectrum. I find that the Introduction Diet is particularly effective in food allergies, as it allows the gut wall heal quicker. The Introduction Diet is structured in stages. Unless there is a dangerous (anaphylactic type) allergy to a particular food, I recommend my patients to ignore the results of their food intolerance testing and follow the stages one by one.

The Introduction Diet in its first stages serves the gut lining in three ways:

  1. It removes fibre. Only well-cooked vegetables (soups and stews) are allowed with particularly fibrous parts of the vegetable removed. No starch is allowed on the GAPS diet, which means no grains and no starchy vegetables.
  2. It provides nourishment for the gut lining. These substances come from homemade meat and fish stocks, gelatinous parts of meats well-cooked in water, organ meats, egg yolks and plenty of natural animal fats on meats.
  3. It provides probiotic bacteria in the form of fermented foods.

As the gut wall starts healing, the patients find that they can gradually introduce foods, which they could not tolerate before. When the Introduction GAPS Diet is completed, the patient moves to the Full GAPS Diet.

SOURCE: Food Allergies By Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride  http://www.gaps.me/food-allergy.php

Published in: Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine, First Quarter, 2009, Vol 24, 1, pp.31-41    For References please see the website.

For more on pathogenic and beneficial microbes, please refer to my Post: How Did I Get Gut Issues? https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/?s=How+Did+I+Get+Gut+Issues%3F

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

 I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

Email: lpolstra@sympatico.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

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My mission is to help people like you get well and stay well. – Dr. Raymond Francis

Raymond Francis, D.Sc., M.Sc., RNC has been called a “brilliant advanced thinker” and has been cited as “one of the few scientists who has achieved a breakthrough understanding of health and disease.”blog jan. 11 hoax image

This Post is Transcript from Dr. Raymond Francis’s 4.47 minute video Processed Foods.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPlo-pARW7A&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR2dTijNc3QzCCu0vszSnoeNxlgAmqq3OopZO-kRJOcqSjLAhu7l86sDwx0

My mission is to help people like you get well and stay well.

Most nutrition experts agree, don’t eat processed foodsand here’s a problem. There is a lot of confusion about what is a processed food, so let me try and add some clarity.

Virtually ALL the packaged goods you buy in a supermarket are processed foods. They’re unhealthy. Processing is anything you do to a raw agricultural commodity after it’s been harvested.Now some processing is benign you know chopping up an apple cutting an apple or chopping some onions.  This is this is minor stuff it’s processing but it’s minimally processed. Minimally processed foods have been used safely since antiquity. They fermented foods, they sun-dried foods.

It’s the modern highly processed foods that are killing us.For example, processing whole wheat into white flour looses the fiber, the essential fatty acids and about 80 percent of the vitamins and minerals.

The average American is eating well over a hundred pounds of this junk every year. Bad enough by itself white flour is then used to create baked goods. These baked goods contain toxins like azodicarbonamide, which is a dough conditioner, caramel coloring, monoglycerides and diglycerides, which are emulsifiers, salt, potassium bromate, which is a carcinogen but it helps the dough to rise higher and gives the bread a nice white color, sugar, processed fats and oils, artificial colors flavors, preservatives. It kind of be nuts to eat this stuff and we’re consuming it by the ton.

Remember, there are only two causes of diseases – deficiency and toxicity.

Modern processing loses nutrients and adds toxins and this is why processed foods cause disease. Beware of foods that come in cans and jars and packages. These include all your baked goods and your pasteurized milk and your breakfast cereals and canned goods and frozen foods and prepared meals. We’ve been taught that frozen food is as good as fresh food. That isn’t true. Frozen foods are not as good as fresh foods. Vegetables are blanched prior to freezing. This results in losing folate, B vitamins, about 25% of vitamin C.

However it’s about choices and in the absence of fresh foods, frozen vegetables may be your best choice. So read labels carefully. The key is to minimize and avoid the worst choices. Especially stay away from those with a LONG list of ingredients. Stay away from these prepackaged things: prepackaged meals and canned foods and baked goods and deli meats and breakfast cereals and supermarket oils and anything that contains flavor enhancers and salt and emulsifiers and stabilizers from sweeteners and thickeners and added fats and oils and processing aids. Wow!

Choose food items with the least amount of stuff in it, no artificial colors, no artificial preservatives, no added sugars, no sodium, no added fats and oils. That’s the best you can do.

But the healthiest choice of all is always freshly harvested, organically produced plant-based foods.  So as much as possible eat vegetables raw. Eat lots of fresh salads dressed with high-quality olive oil or flaxseed oil. In addition high-quality supplements are essential. To learn more about how to get well and stay well read my book The Great American Health Hoax.

My personal journey to improved health was heavily influenced by Dr. Raymond Francis’s book, Never be Sick Again. The rest of his books, Never Be Fat Again, Never Feel Old Again, Never Fear Cancer Again,  also have tips on how to improve your health.  I highly recommend his books.

Amazon sells his books https://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_7?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=raymond+francis&sprefix=raymond%2Cstripbooks%2C173&crid=30D6JYORI5SVY

Please more about Raymond Francis at https://www.facebook.com/RaymondFrancisAuthor/

 I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or or sending me a message or email.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

Email: lpolstra@sympatico.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Conditions Shown to Benefit From a Ketogenic Diet

Mounting research suggests nutritional ketosis is the answer to obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, cancer, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS, MS, autism, migraines, traumatic brain injuries, polycystic ovary syndrome and much more.

The underlying problem is metabolic dysfunction that develops as a result of consuming too many netcarbohydrates (total carbs minus fiber)and/or protein. Sugars found in processed foods and grains are the primary culprits.

By eating a healthy high-fat, low-carbohydrate and low- to moderate-protein diet, you enter into what is known as nutritional ketosis: a state in which your body burns fat as its primary fuel rather than glucose (sugar).

How much protein, please review my Post: How Much Protein Do You Need In Nutritional Ketosis? By Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD Jeff Volek, PhD, RD, etc. al. on February 21, 2018https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/11/09/how-much-protein-do-you-need-in-nutritional-ketosis/

Once you develop insulin and leptin resistance, it triggers biochemical cascades that not only make your body hold on to fat, but produce inflammation and cellular damage as well.

Other benefits include fewer hunger pangs, a dramatic drop in food cravings, helps you retain muscle mass and promotes longevity.

Hence, whether you’re struggling with weight and/or chronic health issues, the treatment is optimizing your metabolic and mitochondrial function. Your diet is key.

The primary reason that so many people are overweight and/or in poor health these days is that the Westernized diet is overloaded with non-fiber carbs as the primary fuel, which in turn inhibit your body’s ability to access and burn body fat.

High-quality fats are a far preferable fuel, as they are utilized far more efficiently than carbs.

How to Enter Into Nutritional Ketosis:   The most efficient way to train your body to use fat for fuel is to remove most of the sugars and starches from your diet, and replace those carbs with healthy fats.

A dietary intake of about 50 grams or less per day of net carbs while also keeping protein low-to-moderate is usually low enough to allow you to make the shift to burning fat (nutritional ketosis).

This is a generalization, as each person responds to foods in a different way. If you’re insulin resistant or have type 2 diabetes, may require less than 40 grams, or even as little as 30 grams per day, to get there.

Nutritional Ketosis Improves Your Brain Health:   Many times, improved cognition and mental acuity are among the first things people notice when entering nutritional ketosis.

Unlike blood glucose, blood ketones do not stimulate an insulin surge. They can even enter cells that have become insulin resistant. This is likely one of the reasons nutritional ketosis works so well for a variety of neurological problems and diseases.

Metabolic conditions (abdominal obesity, elevated triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure and/or elevated fasting blood sugar) have shown improvement with nutritional ketosis.

Hormonal and Nervous System Disorders such as Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are two conditions that appear to respond well to this switch in primary fuel.

Nutritional Ketosis May Be the Key to Cancer Prevention:    It is my (Dr. Mercola) belief, as well as that of many of the experts I have interviewed, that over 90 percent of cancer cases are either preventable or treatable. The key is recognizing that cancer is really a mitochondrial metabolic disease, rooted in poor diet choices combined with a toxic lifestyle. Mitochondrial dysfunction sets you up for developing any number of diseases.

The central premise is that since cancer cells need glucose and insulin to thrive, lowering the glucose level in your blood though carb and protein restriction literally starves the cancer cells. Additionally, low protein intake tends to dampen the mTOR pathway that is often responsible for accelerating cell proliferation.

The remedy lies in optimizing your mitochondrial function and correcting the metabolic dysfunctions of insulin and leptin resistance.

This Post has been condensed from Dr. Mercola’s Posthttps://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/09/26/nutritional-ketosis-benefits.aspxPlease copy and paste the link into your address bar.

The image with the list of food on the Ketogenic Diet and foods to avoid is from the website https://lowcarbalpha.com

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I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

 To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or or sending me a message or email.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

Email: lpolstra@sympatico.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Top Posts for 2018

Today I will focus on the top 3 posts in 2018.  The ranking was based solely on the number of Blog Likes.

Wheat Makes You Fat In Three Ways      Posted February 9th, 2018

https://wordpress.com/post/2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/444

What is the Ketogenic Diet?                      Posted February 2nd, 2018

https://wordpress.com/post/2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/440

Ketogenic Diet App                                     Posted January 1st, 2018

https://wordpress.com/post/2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/438

 In my Blog, Facebook and email Posts my goal is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly my overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 Please join me as I continue to explore the latest and compelling studies on Ketogenic and GAPS diets and the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program.

Please consider following Lydia’s Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

Happy New Year.png

May you have a happy and healthy New Year,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

lpolstra@sympatico.ca

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Happy Holidays

Happy Holidays

Happy Holidays

I would like to take a moment to thank each of you for your views, likes, shares and comments. Your participation in liking posts and the insight you share in your comments means a lot to me.

In my Blog, Facebook and email Posts my goal is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly my overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

Please join me as I continue to explore the latest and compelling studies on Ketogenic and GAPS diets and the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program.

Thank you for being a part of my journey to better health.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

 My most sincere wishes for a Happy Holiday and a healthy, safe and blessed 2019.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

lpolstra@sympatico.ca

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Low Carb Holiday Survival Guide

Tips for surviving the holidays on a Low Carb Diet.

Focus on the people

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The holidays bring up a lot of memories and can also be strongly associated with certain foods. Remember that holidays are about the people you are there to see. Focus more on your friends and family and less on the food.

For those of us with a habit of turning to food in times of stress, the holidays present a unique challenge of added stress and readily available foods. Plus, family members and friends can sometimes add pressure to eat a certain way.

Challenges You Will Face And How Can You Overcome Them:

Knowing yourself and the situations you find most difficult to manage will help you better plan ahead and stay the course when they arise.

Ask yourself which do I want more? To eat things that can throw me off track and cause me to take days to recover from (and possibly feel sick during the recovery) or do I want to stay the course and not have to suffer the repercussions of eating things I shouldn’t have?

Communicate Your Needs:

It can be intimidating to share your way of eating with others, especially if it’s still new. If you bring it up ahead of time though, most hosts will appreciate your honesty. If you’re nervous, you could try employing a friend or family member to speak to the host on your behalf (especially if they’re the one that knows them better) or offer to contribute a dish.

For those closest to you, being honest about why you are turning down the food may be all they need to back down and offer support.

Prepare your response to being tempted:  Say, “no thank you.” Many people will accept this.

State Your Refusal Of Food In Positive Statements:

  • Start with a positive: “I remember how good your (whatever is offered) is!”
  • Insert your reason: “Unfortunately, my body really can’t handle carbohydrates very well”
  • End with another positive statement: “But I can eat your delicious (a low-carb alternative)!”

Communicate with Confidence.

The way we communicate sends signals to the other person on how they should respond. If you are able to assert yourself with confidence, many people will realize “convincing” is not worth it. Some simple but confident phrases you can try are:

“I am sure it’s so good I won’t be able to stop myself.”

“Keeping to the diet is keeping me healthy.”

“Thank you so much for checking in on me. If I need anything I’ll let you know.”

Add Assurance:

At the root of why some people feel the need to push food, is from their fear that they also may be forced to change, or that things will be different now.

Assure your friends and family that this is a personal decision (you add your reasons why if you feel comfortable) and that you will not try to impose it onto them.

Allow them to eat what they choose, without judgement or commentary from you.

Avoid Temptation:

  • Walk away from the tempting food. Even a quick walk can help you put things back in perspective.
  • Know what you are safe to eat/drink. Plan your restaurant meal by checking their menu online.
  • Share your favourite recipes. If you have the opportunity to bring food to a celebration it’s a great chance to show off how delicious low carb foods can be.
  • Healthy snacks.Keep a diet-friendly treat handy. Keep a bag of nuts with you. They will satisfy your hunger and keep you away from temptation.
  • Stick to proteins and veggies:The safest bet is to stick to protein like turkey, ham, and roast and roasted veggies like broccoli, french green beans, and Brussels sprouts.  Go for the veggie casseroles but first ask the person if it was made with flour or sugar added.

Alcohol:

Drinking can make sticking to healthy habits more difficult in many ways. For one, the extra carbohydrates and calories in alcohol add up. Further, drinking lowers inhibitions – which may make you more likely to eat off plan.

If you know you are going to drink alcohol, stick to lower carbohydrate options and consider using seltzer to cut drinks.

Did you know that alcohol, depending on the amount, is burned as fuel before MCT oil, ketones or body fat and take you out of ketosis?

Remember why you started your diet and how hard it was to get into this healthy state, that may help you resist temptation.

Holidays are for enjoying time with friends, family, and loved ones. If you do eat off-plan, take it as a learning experience. Forgiving yourself and moving forward afterwards are what matter and are the best plan of action for reaching your goals.

SOURCE:  Navigating Social Situations on Low Carb: Holiday Survival Guide

https://blog.virtahealth.com/navigating-social-situations-low-carb/

Please consider following Lydia’s Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

For each Post the information will be the same the Blog, Facebook https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/and my emails. In this Blog and FB you can search using key words.

 In this Blog I discuss the Ketogenic and GAPS (for gut health) diets, supplements and Super-slow High Resistance Training.

 If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

 Let me know you like the content by clicking Like or sending me a Comment.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

lpolstra@sympatico.ca

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Weight Loss?

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Weight Loss?

  • In a hurry, check out the Summary and the Bottom Line at the end of this Blog.

Blog Dec. 7 image

In almost every human study of overweight patients lasting 3 months or longer comparing a ketogenic diet to a low fat diet, the weight loss with the low carb diet is somewhat or significantly greater (Sachner-Bernstein 2015). Most of the weight lost on a well-formulated ketogenic diet lasting a few weeks or longer comes from body fat.

Two Questions about the Relationship Between Nutritional Ketosis and Weight Loss

1. First, does being in nutritional ketosis necessarily cause weight loss? Yes in a person who is relatively insulin sensitive, so that when that individual gets to their new stable (‘maintenance’) weight, they could eat a wider range of total daily carbs and still remain weight stable. (The carbs should not include sugar, wheat products or processed food.)

2. This leads us to the second question: Can a human remain in nutritional ketosis and not lose weight?

The Science of Ketones

Ketones particularly ((beta-hydroxybutyrate [BOHB]) are the preferred fuel for the brain and to some degree the heart, allowing these key organs to function as well or even better when dietary carbs are severely restricted compared to when dietary carbohydrates are high.

Switching from carbs to ketones does not happen overnight – it takes weeks of consistently restricting carbs for this process of keto-adaptation to fully occur. But once this process is complete, the body can burn fat at over twice the rate compared to when carbs were a major component of the diet (Phinney 1983, Volek 2016).

Once keto-adapted, people consistently report that the intensity of their hunger and cravings is diminished; (Boden 2005, Mckenzie 2017) and that the daily swings in energy and mood they experienced on a high carb intake are reduced, if not banished. These problems tend to be replaced with a consistent sense of energy and mental alertness as long as a well-formulated ketogenic lifestyle is followed (Volek & Phinney 2012).

Besides being the preferred fuel for the brain and heart, we have recently recognized that BOHB also functions like a hormone that signals multiple changes in gene expression (aka ‘epi-genetic effects’). Among other effects, BOHB turns on the body’s innate defenses against oxidative stress and inflammation (Schimazu 2013, Youm 2014), and it also acts to reduce insulin resistance at its source (Newman 2014).

Ketones (beta-hydroxybutyrate [BOHB] and acetoacetate [AcAc]) are produced by the liver when both serum insulin and liver glycogen levels are low (McGarry 1973). BOHB protects us from oxidative stress, inflammation, diabetes, and probably Alzheimer’s disease and aging as well (Roberts, 2017). All we need do to accrue these benefits is restrict carbs to allow the keto-adaptation process to occur.

Coming back to this question of ketones and weight loss, when someone with some extra body fat begins a ketogenic lifestyle, perhaps it is the increased ability to burn these stores, coupled with the reduction in appetite and cravings, that facilitates initial weight loss. In this scenario, keto-adaptation facilitates weight loss, but only as long as the reduced hunger and cravings allow one to comfortably eat fewer calories per day than one burns.

Over time, most people who sustain a ketogenic lifestyle stop losing weight and find a new stable weight (Hallberg 2018). This is achieved when their natural instincts of hunger and satiety lead to an increase in dietary fat intake to balance out one’s daily expenditure. But as long as dietary protein is kept moderate and carbs low, this dietary fat is used in place of body fat to produce ketones, so clearly nutritional ketosis can be maintained without any further weight loss (Phinney 1983).

But here’s a problem that many people experience. They have been told that increasing blood ketones will speed their weight loss. However, rather than cutting back on carbs and avoiding extra protein to boost ketone levels, they are led to believe that they can get the same effects by adding extra MCT oil, coconut oil, or exogenous BOHB to push up blood ketone levels. But, this does not enhance their body’s ability to burn fat. It just gives them a type of fat that has to be burned (some of it as ketones) in place of body fat. No wonder they are usually disappointed when their weight loss stalls well above the goal they want to reach.

What This Means for Weight Loss and Weight Maintenance on a Ketogenic Diet

In summary, being in nutritional ketosis will accelerate the rate at which the body burns fat. If the extra fat that is burned is compensated by an increase in dietary fat, then no body fat loss will occur (but there still will be other benefits). However, most people carrying excess fat tissue who achieve nutritional ketosis by eating natural low-carbohydrate foods initially feel more satiated, allowing them to eat less fat than they burn, which results in net fat loss. But eventually, even when one is in sustained nutritional ketosis, our natural instincts prompt us to increase fat intake to meet our daily energy needs resulting in a stable weight and body composition.

Bottom line: For those wishing to lose weight additional rather than remain weight stable, one’s goal should be to reduce dietary fat intake down to the margin of satiety (just enough, but not too much) and avoid or limit non-satiating energy sources such as alcohol.

This Post had been condensed from the Virta post https://blog.virtahealth.com/weight-loss-ketogenic-diet/ By Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD and Jeff Volek, PhD, RD

Please consider following Lydia’s Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

For each Post the information will be the same the Blog, Facebook https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/ and my emails.

In this Blog and FB you can search using key words. In this Blog I discuss the Ketogenic and GAPS (for gut health) diets, supplements and Super-slow High Resistance Training.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

Let me know you like the content by clicking Like or sending me a Comment.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra 416-428-5285 lpolstra@sympatico.ca

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.