Cholesterol: The Standard Measure Of Blood LDL Cholesterol Is Inaccurate

For the last 5 decades, most medical and nutrition scientists have focused on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (“bad cholesterol”) as a primary cause of coronary heart disease. While cholesterol lowering therapy has become the standard of care for some individuals with well-defined heart disease risk, this focus on cholesterol in general – and LDL cholesterol in particular – remains very controversial.

Unfortunately the standard measure of blood LDL cholesterol is inaccurate, and when the various components of the blood LDL are measured they represent only a fraction of the lipid (fatty acids) and other biomarkers of heart disease risk.

A turning point in understanding the limitations of LDL and heart disease came with the publication of the Lyon Diet Heart Study. This randomized trial pitted a standard low fat diet against a Mediterranean diet for people with a prior heart attack. There was no difference in LDL cholesterol changes between the Mediterranean and low fat diet groups. The standard calculated LDL value did not seem to matter that much indicating that some very important drivers of coronary disease risk were going unmeasured.

In the recently published 1-year results from the IUH/Virta diabetes reversal study, they reported a small but significant rise in the average blood LDL cholesterol level in patients on a well-formulated ketogenic diet (WFKD). At the same time, however, they noted major reductions in a number of coronary disease risk factors including weight, blood pressure, and HbA1c.

The pattern of how these other risk factors change is independent of the changes in LDL.

In Figure 1, (please see the original post) the number of patients whose LDL went up was somewhat greater than the number whose LDL went down.

In the Figure 2, the 14 other risk factors with improved risk far outweigh those indicating a negative response. The heart disease risk factors indicate that a WFKD is much healthier than one might conclude by focusing on the single LDL risk factor.

Novel results from the IUH Diabetes Reversal Study:

Figure 2

Blog - July 26 actual numbers for each of the risk factors -3.png

Here is a table (figure 2) with the actual numbers for each of the risk factors shown in figure 1, plus HbA1c and weight. For each factor, there is a change between baseline and 1-year as a percent, the P-value indicating the chance this change might occur at random (i.e., the smaller the better), and then arrows up or down indicating how this change might influence overall heart disease and mortality risk.

These results are interesting for two reasons. First, none of the short term studies of ketogenic diets given to patients with type 2 diabetes lasting a few week to a few months have sustained these benefits without weight regain and/or rising HbA1c values after 1 year.

Second, no prior prospective outpatient low carbohydrate diet study has documented anything near this degree (0.6 mM at 10 weeks and 0.3 to 0.4 mM at one year) of sustained nutritional ketosis in such a large group past the first few months of treatment.

Note that only the arrow for calculated LDL cholesterol points up, whereas all of the other 16 point down. Also note that of these 16, only two have associated P-values that are non-significant or borderline. All of the others indicate a chance of random error of less than 1-in-ten-thousand. This means in turn is that these observations of reduced risk are statistically very strong.

This sustained nutritional ketosis may be a pivotal factor in risk reductions. The resultant beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) is now understood to be a potent epigenetic signal controlling the body’s defenses against oxidative stress, inflammation, and insulin resistance.

What Blood Lipids Actually Do:

We have known for a long time that blood levels of both cholesterol and saturated fat tend to be independent of how much of these nutrients we eat.

But a completely different set of factors come into play when we eat less energy than we burn, which forces the body to dip into its energy stores and thus mobilize body fat. Similarly, when we restrict dietary carbohydrates, either body fat or dietary fat has to become the body’s principle source of energy. This is most profound in the keto-adapted state, where circulating lipids and blood ketones (made from fat in the liver) together provide 75-85% of the body’s energy. Lipoproteins play a critical role in the transport of lipid in the bloodstream, so changes in delivery needs in turn will impact lipoprotein lab results.

In response to the state of nutritional ketosis, humans can more than double their rates of fat oxidation (i.e., use for fuel) at rest and during exercise. So when you combine a doubling of fat intake with a doubling of fat use, clearly a lot more fat has to pass through the bloodstream.

We have spent a few decades studying how the body adapts to a WFKD, and have come to recognize a pretty consistent pattern for the changes in most blood lipids, but a quite inconsistent pattern for the calculated LDL cholesterol level in particular. The consistent changes are:

  • A dramatic reduction in serum triglycerides
  • A rise in HDL cholesterol and
  • The same or lower levels of saturated fats in serum triglycerides

The one inconsistent variable in this otherwise predictable pattern of change is the calculated serum LDL cholesterol level. For some people, following a ketogenic diet makes their LDL cholesterol go down and for some it does not change. But for a fair number of people the calculated LDL cholesterol value rises, in some cases quite a lot. Thus the key question is: How important is the calculated LDL cholesterol relative to the other risk factors that have been recently characterized?

Why LDL Cholesterol is Not a Single Number:

There are two important limitations of the commonly reported serum LDL cholesterol level.

First, the usual test procedure does not actually measure LDL – it reports a calculated value based upon measurements of serum total and HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, along with a number of assumptions. And in particular, when the triglyceride value undergoes a big change, it can skew the calculated LDL value considerably.

Second, the circulating lipoprotein particles classed as LDL are actually quite diverse in size, and it is now recognized that the smaller, more dense particles (which carry proportionately less triglyceride) are the sub-fraction that is associated with vascular damage and heart disease.

In Figure 2, only the calculated LDL cholesterol value went in the ‘wrong direction.’ But in this case, it appears that this was due to a shift to a greater proportion of the larger particles because the total particle number did not change, the average particle size increased, while the small dense particle number was significantly decreased.

Inflammation as an Independent Risk Factor for Coronary Vascular Disease:

Three decades ago, a number of mainstream investigators noted that the total white blood cell count and then c-reactive protein levels appear to predict coronary disease and mortality independent of cholesterol.

The key question as to whether this was a mere association or causal. This question was resolved with the recent CANTOS Trial, which reduced coronary risk by 15% without any effect on LDL cholesterol levels.

Unfortunately a side effect of the antibody used in this study (an increase in fatal infections) cancelled out the coronary disease risk reduction, so the CANTOS Trial answered an important question but did not offer a therapeutic solution. However this does offer an interesting insight into the mystery of why the Lyon Diet Heart Study reduced coronary disease risk AND mortality. In that study, blood anti-oxidant levels increased and granulocytes (aka white blood cells) decreased, suggesting that a dietary anti-inflammatory intervention can have potent benefits absent the dangerous side-effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

Blood Saturated Fats and CVD Risk:

The key fact to keep in mind is that while a primary source of saturated fat in the blood is de novo lipogenesis (i.e., the production of fat from excess dietary carbohydrate), there is little if any relationship between dietary saturated fat intake and blood saturated fat content. And most importantly, because the keto-adapted state doubles the body’s ability to burn saturated fat for fuel while at the same time shutting down de novo lipogenesis, blood levels of saturated fats are reduced independent of dietary saturated fat intake.

There is a review of this topic in the blog, The Sad Saga of Saturated Fat. https://wordpress.com/post/2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/698

Getting Beyond Single Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Risk:

There is a wide range of processes that contribute to atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease risk. American College of Cardiology offers a 10-year heart disease risk predictor that includes the following inputs: age, sex, race, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and medication use (statin, hypertension, aspirin).

Based upon this equation, the 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk score in the recent Virta study decreased -11.9% (P = 5×10-5). This is a large beneficial effect experienced by the participants in the Virta study despite the observed changes in calculated LDL values.

Continuous doctor’s care treatment including nutritional ketosis in patients with type 2 diabetes improved most biomarkers of CVD risk after the Virta one-year study. The increase in LDL-cholesterol appeared limited to the large LDL sub-fraction; whereas LDL particle size increased, total LDL-P and ApoB were unchanged, and inflammation and blood pressure decreased.

There so many different factors are associated with coronary risk we need to avoid focusing on just LDL.

This Post has been condensed from the Virta blog: Blood Lipid Changes With A Well-Formulated Ketogenic Diet In Context by Rich Wood, PhD, Amy McKenzie, PhD, Jeff Volek, PhD, RD, Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD on May 2, 2018. Please see the original for the Footnotes and Citations for the scientific studies. Here is the link https://blog.virtahealth.com/blood-lipid-changes-with-ketogenic-diet/

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

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May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

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Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Lose Weight with Reduced Hunger and Cravings

If you feel like whenever you count and/or restrict calories your appetite begins a progressive climb the longer you count or restrict your calorie intake, you may be right.

Our bodies have an innate survival mode that kicks in to maintain energy balance when our stored energy reserves (i.e., body fat) are threatened. Obesity and metabolic diseases, like type 2 diabetes (T2D), can upset these natural signals the body uses to regulate appetite and energy balance, making weight loss even more difficult.

In this Post, we will explore the scientific basis behind appetite, the various factors that regulate how we experience hunger and the subsequent effect those signals have to counteract weight loss. We also look at the ways in which a well-formulated ketogenic diet (WFKD) affects appetite and the mechanisms through which this manner of eating can help you lose weight and maintain the weight loss while simultaneously improving your health.

Blog Jul. 19 picture

For more information the Ketogenic diet, please see my Blog Post, How Do I Do the Ketogenic Diet? https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/04/13/how-do-i-do-the-ketogenic-diet/

Most individuals who are instructed to eat healthy fats till satisfied on a WFKD can lose substantial amounts of weight by a combination of reduced hunger and cravings and/or better access to body fat stores for fuel.

Weight Loss on a Ketogenic Diet

In Virta’s recently published results they reported an average 12-month weight loss of greater than 12% in patients with T2D, and weight loss continued out to 8 months and was then sustained out to 12 months without weight regain.

Additionally, at week 10, the patients reported less hunger than at the beginning. This was because from day 1 through day 365 these patients were instructed to eat a WFKD to satiety. As a result our patients maintained average blood ketones of 0.6 mM after 10 weeks and 0.4 mM after 12 months. What this means is that these lasting weight loss results were achieved with long-term adherence to a WFKD and without purposeful calorie restriction or the need to resist persistent hunger.

Severely restricting calories or significantly increasing the volume exercise predictably brings on appetite, hunger, and cravings. Therefore, the longer an individual maintains the caloric restriction and the greater the amount of weight loss, the stronger the appetite signals.

Hormones and Hunger

When blood insulin levels are high, glucose (carbs) gets stored as glycogen and fats get stored in adipose tissue, the resulting reduction in glucose and free fatty acids, then stimulates appetite. This leads to the common experience of being hungry 2-3 hours after a high carbohydrate, low fat meal. Other hormones are leptin and ghrelin. Both have specific receptors in the brain that transmit their message – for leptin it is “eat less” and for ghrelin it is “eat more”.

The brain’s response to leptin is inhibited by inflammation, resulting in leptin resistance. Inflammation is dramatically reduced by sustained nutritional ketosis, it appears that the reduction in leptin resistance due to reduced inflammation more than compensates for the lower leptin levels.

On a WFKD the brain perceives a greater satiety response to less leptin.

 Simply put, nutritional ketosis reduces elevated insulin levels and inflammation, which allows the normal signals from excess body fat stores to tell the brain “Eat less!” Therefore, when heavy people eat a WFKD to satiety, they tend to lose quite a bit of weight until the balance of these signals naturally guides them to a stable lower weight.

For many this is probably more than enough science. For the rest of you, what follows are the details and additional references that back up this very complex but important story.

The Science of Appetite: What We Can Learn From Very Low Calorie Diets

A Very Low Calorie Diet (800 per day) is not sustainable for the long-term and individuals often return to a carbohydrate-rich diet that resembles the one that contributed to their metabolic dysfunction. There is often a significant increase in hunger signals. For most individuals there is a good chance they will regain the weight they lost and possibly more.

Individuals with metabolic diseases, such as pre-diabetes and T2D, frequently have not fully resolved their underlying insulin resistance and the glycemic (glucose/sugar blood levels) improvements can also rebound to pre-WFKD levels. These patients would have fared better had they been transitioned from the Very Low Calorie Diet (VLCD) onto a sustainable ketogenic diet that allowed them to sustain nutritional ketosis for metabolic health as seen in the Virta diabetes reversal study which showed progressive weight loss out to 8 months and then weight stability to month 12.

Mechanisms of Appetite Regulation and Leptin Resistance

The reduction in perceived hunger may be due to combination of an effect of ketosis on the activity of appetite-regulating hormones, or ketones acting on the brain directly, or a relationship with the gut microbiota. Studies looking at patients prescribed a VLCD maintained beta-hydroxybutyrate levels of 0.3mM or greater had suppressed ghrelin levels, while those who were not in ketosis had higher ghrelin levels. Thus, nutritional ketosis in a weight loss effort may not only contribute to initial weight loss but may also play an important role in sustainability and weight maintenance.

A pro-inflammatory diet rich in a combination of sugar and saturated fat has been shown to effect chronic energy imbalance and changes in fat mass. Because leptin acts within the hypothalamus, the over-activation of immune cells can impair leptin signaling. For example, C-reactive protein has been shown to actively inhibit leptin’s satiety signal. This multi-dimensional inflammatory response likely begins before obesity and contributes to the development of metabolic dysfunction.

Another proposed mechanism to explain leptin resistance is that elevated blood triglycerides cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) and impair both the transport of leptin across the BBB as well as inhibit receptor function in the brain, thereby promoting leptin resistance. Because it has been repeatedly demonstrated that carbohydrate restriction reduces triglyceride levels, this is an additional explanation for the significantly lower leptin levels observed with ketogenic diets, adding to the anti-inflammatory effects of the diet, which increase leptin sensitivity.

If functioning optimally, leptin also indirectly effects our responses to feeding; which helps us avoid over-eating simply because something tastes good instead of eating for true hunger. Leptin, therefore, may end up being more of a factor in the maintenance of weight loss than in losing weight itself.

Nutritional Ketosis and Appetite

The anti-inflammatory properties of nutritional ketosis can be directly linked to improved satiety giving us both successful weight loss and maintenance.

Consistently following a WFKD promotes improvements in metabolic health that go beyond weight loss and contribute to long-term well-being. Nutritional ketosis can enhance appetite control signals, reduce inflammation and facilitate diet adherence and sustainability. These advantages can go a long way towards supporting your health while not requiring you to suffer through constant hunger and the frustration of roller-coaster weight fluctuations.

This Post has been condensed from the source: The Science of Nutritional Ketosis and Appetite by Brooke Bailey, Ph.D Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, Jeff Volek, PhD, RD. Please see the original for the Footnotes and Citations for the scientific studies.

https://blog.virtahealth.com/ketosis-appetite-hunger/

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

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May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Low Carb Grocery Shopping Guide with GAPS Recommendations.

Low Carb Grocery Shopping Guide with GAPS Recommendations

Blog - shopping.png

To succeed on your diet you need to start with a list of acceptable foods. See the tips and grocery list for a low carb or ketogenic lifestyle. For people (like me) who are following the Full GAPS diet as well, foods that are not permitted have been deleted or have a GAPS notation.

Grocery Shopping Tips

  1. Establish a routine — and stick to it

Stock up on essentials to avoid trips to the store.

Ensure your weekly shopping is always done by blocking out time that works best in you.

  1. Always shop with a grocery list

Plan meals and snacks for the week (or more) before shopping to make sure you buy everything you need.

Stick to your list so you will avoid temptations.

  1. Avoid shopping on an empty stomach

If you shop hungry, you may be tempted and suffer the consequences of a lapse.

  1. Focus on the perimeter of the store

The perimeter has non-starchy vegetables, berries, eggs, dairy, meat, fish and poultry.

Skip the inner aisles with processed carbs like chips and cookies.

Fresh fruit and vegetables is preferred but the next best frozen.

Shop inner aisle only for the diet-friendly condiments and oils, etc.

  1. Think twice about specialty “low carb” and “sugar-free” products

While a ketogenic lifestyle might include occasional low carb specialty products, the majority of your grocery bounty should be minimally processed, whole, nourishing foods.

When in doubt, read the nutrition label and ingredients list to make sure a product won’t derail your progress toward your health goals.

  1. Take advantage of online shopping

No time. Most chain grocery stores offer curbside pickup or home delivery services.

Use a saved or “Favorite” list on their shopping platform ahead of time to make ordering easier.

Key Items to Add to Your Grocery List

Produce

Asparagus

Avocado

Berries (strawberry, raspberry, blueberry, blackberry)

Beans (green, yellow, wax)

Bok choy

Broccoli

Brussels sprouts

Cabbage

Cauliflower

Celery

Cucumber

Eggplant

Garlic

Green beans

Greens, collard

Greens, spinach

Kale

Lemons

Limes

Lettuce (Romaine, arugula, spring mix, iceberg, endive, escarole)

Mushrooms

Onions

Peppers (green, red, orange/yellow)

Snow peas

Spaghetti squash

Tomatoes

Zucchini/summer squash

Meat, Fish and Poultry – Free Range if possible

Bacon*

Beef steaks

Deli meat (cured meats, e.g., salami and prosciutto) * GAPS: Look for a source that makes it from free-range meats and chemical free.

Canned tuna, salmon –  Try Vital Choice for mercury-free https://www.vitalchoice.com/#smile-home

Chicken (opt for skin on)

Fish

Ground beef (opt for 12% fat or greater)

Lamb

Pancetta

Pork steaks and chops

Sausage

Shrimp and shellfish

Turkey

Wild game (e.g, bison, deer, elk)

* Always scan the nutrition label, these often contain starchy fillers and/or added sugars.

Dairy Section

GAPS has recommendations for dairy to support intestinal health:

Asiago cheese Yes      May be used occasionally.

Blue cheese      Yes      May be used occasionally.

Brick cheese    Yes      May be used freely.

Brie cheese      Yes      May be used occasionally.

Camembert cheese      Yes      May be used occasionally.

Cheddar cheese, mild, medium, Yes Use freely

Cheddar cheese, sharp            Yes      May be used occasionally.

Colby cheese    Yes      May be used freely.

Cottage cheese, uncreamed (dry curd)           Yes      May be used freely.

Cream cheese  No

Edam cheese   Yes      May be used occasionally.

Eggs – Yes      Free-range.

Gorgonzola cheese      Yes      May be used occasionally.

Gouda cheese  Yes      May be used occasionally

Gruyere cheese            Yes      May be used freely.

Half and half – No

Havarti cheese            Yes      May be used freely.

Heavy cream – No

Limburger Cheese       Yes      May be used occasionally.

Manchego cheese        Yes

Monterey Jack cheeseYes      May be used occasionally.

Muenster cheese         Yes      May be used occasionally.

Natural cheeses          Yes

Parmesan cheese        Yes      May be used occasionally. Grate it, check to endure no added milk solids. You make your own crisps.

Port du Salut cheese   Yes      May be used occasionally.     

Provolone cheese        Yes      Although not listed with the other cheeses on page 140 of Breaking the Vicious Cycle, provolone cheese is legal.

Romano cheese           Yes      May be used occasionally.

Roquefort cheese        Yes      May be used occasionally.

Sour cream – No

Stilton cheese  Yes      May be used occasionally

Swiss cheese   Yes      May be used freely.

Yogurt – No, Make you own if possible. See the GAPS book for the recipe.

 Nuts And Seeds

Almonds

All natural peanut and almond butter*

Macadamia nuts

Peanuts*

Pecans

Pistachios

Sunflower seeds

Pumpkin seeds

Walnuts

*Look for ‘natural’ nut butters with no added sugar and avoid those containing hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils. Peanuts have a higher carb content than some other nut options, so proceed with caution when it comes to portion sizes.

Oils/Cooking Fats, Salad Dressings and Mayonnaise

* Avoid added sugar and additives by making your own salad dressings from oils with higher saturated and monounsaturated fat contents, such as olive, or avocado oil.

Oils:

Avocado oil

Beef tallow

Butter

Canola oil – GAPS, not recommended.

Coconut oil

Ghee

Lard

Olive oil, extra virgin

Palm oil

Safflower oil, high oleic

Miscellaneous Extras:

Almond flour

Almond milk (unsweetened)

Bouillon cubes – GAPS, not recommended.

Coconut flour

Coconut milk

Condiments: Ketchup, BBQ sauce, etc. (check the labels for sugar and chemicals)

Pork rinds

Sugar-free gelatin

Xanthan gum

Source:

  1. Low Carb Grocery Shopping Guide (Grocery List Print Out is in the website)

Anna Barnwell, MPH, MSW  Anna Barnwell, MPH, MSW on August 6, 2018

https://blog.virtahealth.com/low-carb-keto-grocery-shopping/

  1. Breaking the Vicious Cycle™ Legal­‐Illegal List (for GAPS and SCD) http://media.btvc.webfactional.com/media/editor_uploads/2013/11/btvc_legalillegal_list.pdf

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise. 

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader

Symptoms Of Overtraining

Have you had these symptoms of overtraining:

  • Exercise leaves you exhausted instead of energized.
  • You get sick easily (or it takes forever to get over a cold)
  • You have the blues
  • You’re unable to sleep or you can’t seem to get enough sleep
  • You have ”heavy” legs
  • You have a short fuse
  • You’re regularly sore for days at a time

Dr. McGuff recommends high-intensity interval training using weights.

Blog July 5 exercise.jpg

He redefines anaerobic type training, aerobic type training, and cardiovascular training. Those are all misleading terms. The first thing you have to realize is the only way that you can access the cardiovascular system is by performing mechanical work with muscle. You can do that on an elliptical or on quality weight training equipment or with a barbell.

Dr. Doug McGuff is an emergency medical physician. He says, I originally became interested in exercises when I was about 14 years old. I was in a sport called bicycle motocross. I was just starting and there were certain sections that involved a large hill climb that I could not make. My brother had barbell sets in the garage. I decided to break out the manual for that and give that a try.

Within one month, I went from last-place to untouchable. I made it to the professional level by the time I was 17. I followed the works of Arthur Jones and Mike Mentzer (pioneers of high-intensity training), that probably kept me from going as high in that sport as I should.

I actually over trained. I was doing three very hard sessions per week religiously, in addition to the racing schedule. I winded out.

I started to pay more attention to restricting the amount of training that was being done and increasing the amount of recovery time. I realized that there was actually a spectrum of recovery capabilities amongst different people. I spaced my workouts further and further apart and getting better results.

What we need to understand is that with high-intensity exercise, you are sequentially recruiting all the different types of muscle fibers that you have.

First, you recruit the smaller motor units that are made up of slow-twitch fibers that are largely aerobic in metabolism, have a lot of endurance, and recover quickly.

 For example, long, slow, distance-type of exercise can actually cause your intermediate and fast-twitch fibers to begin to atrophy. Aside from losing muscle mass, this also promotes onset of loss of insulin sensitivity

If you fatigue through slow-twitch fibers, you will next recruit some intermediate fibers. If you do that quickly enough, then you will recruit these fast-twitch fibers, which are the largest glucose (energy) storage reservoir.When these muscles are recruited, it creates the stimulus needed to grow muscle. At the same time, it enlarges the glucose storage reservoir in the muscle, which enhances your insulin sensitivity.

High-intensity interval trainingthat takes five to seven minutes has been proven to be equally as beneficial for producing aerobic metabolic adaptations, as long-term steady state aerobic activity that took an hour that would produce. (The explanation is at the 8:25 minutes into the video in the second source mentioned below).

High-intensity exercise, which engage your fast-twitch muscle fibers, is required if you want an effective aerobic workout, and can cut your workout time from an hour on the treadmill down to 12-15 minutes.

At that point, recovery is more important. The amount that you’re body has to recover from has increased that much, so you’re recovery interval needs to be spaced out for it to continue to be productive.

If you exercise too frequently you are not going to get a growth hormone spike; you’re going to get cortisol spike. You’re going to head into an overtraining syndrome and risk over-taxing your adrenals.

As you get stronger the percentage of your muscle mass that is going to be accounted for by that fast-twitch fiber that requires more recovery is increasing relative to other types of muscle mass. That recovery interval is actually going to go for three days, five days, and further as your conditioning gets better.

When it’s time to exercise, you should feel like you’re busting at the seams. In between, you will have the energy to enjoy other activities.

My exercise of choice is Dr. Doug McGuff’s Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program that I do for 15 minutes, once a week. Here is the link to the PDF version of his book. The book downloads automatically. https://ia801905.us.archive.org/23/items/BodyByScience/Body%20by%20Science.pdf

Source: Long-Distance Running: Avoid This Popular Exercise As It Shrinks Your Muscle and Accelerates Aging (Transcript downloads automatically) https://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2012/01/06/dr-doug-mcguff-on-exercise.aspx

Links to past Posts of Dr. McGuff recommended exercise workouts:

  1. Body By Science: Four Machines for Women. https://wordpress.com/post/2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/535
  2. BODY BY SCIENCE 7 (THE “BIG 5” WORKOUT) for Men. https://wordpress.com/post/2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/543

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise. 

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.