How to Travel While Staying Keto/ Low Carb

For many people, traveling often leads to cheating on their ketogenic diet. With increased exposure to carbohydrates and difficulty finding low-carb, high fat alternatives, it may seem like too much of a hassle to stick to your ketogenic efforts.

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But by preparing for your trip by following these tips, traveling while eating keto will be much easier than you think!

  1. Keep it simple

Sticking to the basics can help you stick to your goals. The more you prepare for your upcoming trip, the easier it will be to stay low carb. Eat simple foods like veggies and small amounts of meat.

  1. Plan ahead

Have a meal before you leave the house, bring along some backup snacks, and seek out low carb options from restaurants, convenience stores, and perhaps some unexpected places like drug stores. Seeking out low carb options will get easier over time!

Before leaving for your trip, scope out the food scene. Most restaurants have their menus available online. If you’re traveling somewhere more remote, make sure to bring along snacks.

Here are a few great ketogenic snacks you can bring with you on the go:

Hard-boiled eggs

Cheese

Cooked bacon

Parmesan cheese crisps

Nuts (macadamia nuts, walnuts, and almonds)

Nut butters

Dark chocolate (85% cacao or higher)

Beef jerky (check the sugar content first)

Fat bombs

Buy the most appealing “keto snacks” from Amazon.

Bring along dressing (in a small container), salt, and snacks that don’t require refrigeration, or bring a small cooler and ice pack with snacks and drinks that need to be kept cold.

If you’re traveling to visit family or friends, make sure to be open about your goals ahead of time so they have an opportunity to support your food choices.

While visiting supply as much of your own food as you can by doing a grocery run after arrival, or packing it in the car for the road trip. If you have options to where to stay, try for a place where you can cook. If you are going to friend’s home for cookouts, tell them you will be bringing something. Make enough to share. If they know you are doing this program, they will be relieved they don’t need to worry about you.

Before you leave your home eat a large meal before you leave. Make it is a fairly large, nutrient-dense ketogenic meal. If you’re leaving in the morning, making a quick steak and eggs breakfast along with an avocado will ensure you have the proper amounts of healthy protein and fats to power you through much of your day.

If you have an early morning flight, eat a protein and fat filled breakfast like eggs and bacon, then consider fasting until your supper meal.

Utilize Intermittent Fasting. Intermittent fasting will make staying in ketosis a breeze while you’re traveling. Consider just having two big meals. You will experience deeper levels of ketosis and it helps you cut out all  the tempting junk food and snacks.

Put some ready low carb foods in your refrigerator and freezer for when you come home.

  1. Ask for what you want

It is challenging when people do not understand why you doing the diet. Explain why you’re committed to a low-carb lifestyle. The more people understand why you’re making the choices you are, the more likely they’ll be to support them.

Check out the restaurant menu online before going out. Choose the place that offers ketogenic-friendly meal options.

When dining out, don’t be afraid to ask for modifications. Most restaurants will be accommodating since they want your business.  And with a little creativity, you should be able to eat a healthy low carb, high fat meal no matter where you decide to eat.

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Here are a few tips for eating keto at restaurants:

Always ask to double up on vegetables instead of having bread or a starch

Use olive oil and vinegar as dressing

Ask for butter to place onto your vegetables

If you want a burger, ask the server to have it lettuce wrapped instead of in a bun

Ask for grilled meats with vegetables and a fat like guacamole.

Drink water instead of soda

Skip dessert

Buy low carb foods at the local grocery store. Browse the Internet for any local “health food stores”, they are most likely to carry ketogenic-friendly snacks and meals.

Stock up on low carb, high fat snacks to put in the fridge where you are staying. Fresh meat such as rotisserie chicken can help you stay on your diet.

Here are a few other options you can get at the food store during your trip:

Rotisserie chicken

Egg

Chicken wings (unbreaded)

Salad (don’t mix dressing until ready to eat)

Bacon

Full-fat yogurt

Hummus

Cheese

Tuna

Drink Keto Coffee to prevent hunger. Bringing MCT oil, coconut oil or butter with you and making a “keto coffee” is a great travel hack. By adding healthy fats into your coffee, you’ll stay satiated for longer periods of time, improve your ketone production, and it’ll make it easier for you to hit your daily healthy fat intake.

If you can’t find any low-carb alternatives at the place you’re staying, a quick keto coffee followed by a healthy protein source can help you stay in ketosis and keep carb cravings at bay.

  1. Move past lapses

Even when we try our best, sometimes we go a bit off plan. Don’t beat yourself up. Just get right back on track.

  1. Enjoy yourself!

Trips and vacations are meant to be enjoyed. Focus on spending time with friends and family. Take them on a hike or walk to explore the area.

Travel is fun. Just do your best and remember to eat a little extra fat when you can to help you feel full and curb cravings. Make the most of your adventure and safe travels!

This Post has been condensed from theses sources.

Source: https://blog.virtahealth.com/low-carb-keto-travel/

Source: How to Travel While Staying Keto  https://www.carbmanager.com/article/how-to-travel-while-staying-keto-36a2e61b-e979-1b07-2b23-0170768591f2 

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Inflammation, Nutritional Ketosis, Type 2 Diabetes and Keto-Immune Modulation

Nutritional ketosis has anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects that are as potent as the most powerful drugs. This explains how a well-formulated ketogenic diet reverses type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

Inflammation enables our bodies to recognize and respond to infection and injury. Having too weak of an inflammatory response leaves us prone to infection or impaired healing. But having too great of a response, or one that remains over-active for too long, puts us at risk for a form of chronic injury that underlies type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, many common cancers, and Alzheimer’s disease.

This balance between too little and too much inflammation is regulated by a number of circumstances including our genetic inheritance, toxins in the environment, and by many components of our diet.

Currently, we have a host of different drug classes designed to modulate inflammation, but safely managing their dose and duration of use requires professional vigilance to avoid dangerous side effects.

In the past decade, nutritional ketosis has emerged as a potent modulator of inflammation. And, unlike drugs that typically target just one aspect of the body’s immune response, keto-immuno-modulation (KIM) seems to work evenly to balance the anti-inflammatory effect in a safe, sustainable and surprisingly potent way without the serious side effects that characterize most pharmaceuticals.

Measuring Inflammation Levels

High-normal white blood cell count (WBC) levels as well as another test reflective of inflammation in the body called C-reactive protein (CRP) have been shown to also predict the development of type 2 diabetes, many common forms of cancer, and probably Alzheimer’s.

Complexity of Inflammation at a Glance

When there is too much inflammation a class of disorders called auto-immune disease can occur and the body’s activated defenses attack some of its own organs, causing conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, and type 1 diabetes. These immune disorders can result in an increased risk of heart disease, as are people with type 2 diabetes.

Drugs that Reduce Inflammation

Older, established drugs, like aspirin, tend to have more general modes of action and a broader spectrum of side effects. Recent pharmaceutical research has moved to target specific enzymes, bioactive molecules, or white blood cell types involved in inflammation to try to reduce side effects, but by focusing on just one single step in the complex cascade of the inflammation/immune system, there is a strong tendency to distort this system rather than reduce the inflammatory effect in a balanced manner.

The risks associated with chronic use of a variety of anti-inflammatory drugs often outweigh the desired benefits.

One example, when aspirin is used routinely in people without known heart disease (primary prevention), fatal hemorrhage is significantly increased.

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Dietary Anti-inflammatory Treatments

A natural form of vitamin E – gamma-tocopherol (rather than alpha-tocopherol) has potent anti-inflammatory and oxidative stress lowering properties when used alone or in combination with the omega-3 fatty acid DHA.

Weight loss itself has been shown to reduce inflammation, and it appears that the greater the weight loss the larger the anti-inflammatory effect. This could be attributable to a reduction in the amount of very inflammatory belly fat, and/or a result of some patients being in nutritional ketosis.

Beta-hydroxybutyrate has potent regulatory effects on inflammation

Among the many ‘nutritional factors’ with potential anti-inflammatory properties, the ketone beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) is emerging as both highly potent and uniquely safe as a long-term treatment for inflammation. When in the physiologically normal range that is seen with nutritional ketosis, BOHB activates a number of different genes that protect our cells from oxidative stress and inflammation.

Reactive oxygen species (ROS), aka ‘free radicals’ appear to be connected to inflammation. NSAIDs can’t block them. BOHB prevents this whole class of pro-inflammatory compounds from being created in the first place.

Please see the original Virta Post for the diagramof the contrasting effects of diets containing carbohydrate-plus-protein totals above 30% (thus suppressing ketogenesis) and a ketogenic diet on down-stream inflammatory pathways regulated by BOHB.

Upon starting a well-formulated ketogenic diet, the fatty acid most commonly attacked by ROS, called arachidonic acid, promptly increases. Much less AA is being destroyed by ROS when the body is in nutritional ketosis, therefore less needs to be made in order to maintain optimum membrane levels of this important essential fatty acid.

The level of AA in muscle membrane is strongly correlated with insulin sensitivity thus offering an explanation for the prompt improvement in insulin sensitivity upon initiation of a ketogenic diet.

Clinical Studies Demonstrating Reduced Inflammation

In a randomized trial comparing two weight loss diets – one ketogenic and the other low fat, high carbohydrate – the ketogenic diet demonstrated much greater anti-inflammatory effects after 12 weeks. Additionally, in our Virta/IUH study of patients with type 2 diabetes, both WBC count and C-reactive protein (CRP) were dramatically reduced in the ketogenic diet group compared to the usual care group at 1 and 2-year follow-up. In particular, the reduction in CRP in the ketogenic diet group at 1 year was comparable in magnitude (35-40%) to what is seen with the most potent statin drug.But unlike the statin, which appears to be primarily focused on CRP and has no effect on WBC count, nutritional ketosis addresses both, providing a more balanced effect on the network of interacting bioactive components influencing inflammation.

Perhaps, nutritional ketosis should be considered the new metabolic normal for people with diseases associated with or caused by chronic inflammation.

This Post has been condensed from Inflammation, Nutritional Ketosis, Type 2 Diabetes and Keto-Immune Modulation by Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD, Bailey, Ph.D., Jeff Volek, PhD, RD January 3, 2019 https://blog.virtahealth.com/ketone-supplements/https://blog.virtahealth.com/inflammation-ketosis-diabetes/More scientific information and Citations of the supporting studies are included in the Virta post.

Not sure what the Ketogenic diet is? Please read, What is the Ketogenic Diet? , in my Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/02/02/what-is-the-ketogenic-diet/

 I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Keto: The Best Fatty Liver Diet

The ketogenic diet is a good diet for reversing nonalcoholic liver disease. It is improved by following these guidelines:

  1. Restrict Carbohydrates to 5% of Your Daily Calories
  2. Eat High-Fiber Foods With Every Meal
  3. Eat Liver Healing Foods such as oily fish, nuts avocado and olive oil.
  4. Use Liver Healing Supplements such as spirulina, betaine, milk thistle and probiotics.
  5. Limit Alcohol Consumption
  6. Exercise Everyday – brisk walks, resistance training.

There are two main types of fatty liver disease:

  • Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NFLD)
  • Alcoholic fatty liver disease (alcoholic steatohepatitis)

There are five conditions that are commonly associated with NFLD: type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, dyslipidemia (abnormally elevated cholesterol levels), and metabolic syndrome. Scientists believe that they are intimately linked because they can all be caused by a combination of lifestyle, genetics, and gut health issues.

In epidemiological studies including people with type 2 diabetes, 62 to 69% of them also had NFLD. Another study found that 50% of patients with dyslipidemia (abnormally elevated cholesterol levels) had NFLD.

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NFLD usually causes no signs and symptoms. When it does, they may include:

  • Enlarged liver
  • Fatigue
  • Pain in the upper right abdomen

Possible signs and symptoms of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis (advanced scarring) include:

  • Abdominal swelling (ascites)
  • Enlarged blood vessels just beneath the skin’s surface
  • Enlarged breasts in men
  • Enlarged spleen
  • Red palms
  • Yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice)

What Causes Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease?

  1. Lifestyle – Eating Too Much and Exercising Too Little
  • Insulin resistance is a common side effect of eating too much and exercising too little, and it is one of the main reasons why fat builds up in the liver.Many researchers agree that improving insulin sensitivity is a key strategy in the treatment of NFLD.
  • The quickest way to increase fat build up in the liver is by overfeeding on carbohydrates.Fructose, especially, will lead to the most fat accumulation in the liver.
  1. Genetics — Gene Variants, Gender, and Ethnicity
  • Genetics can play a role in the development of NFLD. It is important to develop healthy lifestyle habits if your parents and grandparents struggled with NFLD.
  1. Gut Health Issues — Your Microbiome and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
  • Studies done on the microbiome of obese patients have increased abundance of the bacteria called Firmicutes. This increase leads to an increase in lipopolysaccharide absorption that triggers a potent inflammatory response in the body.

Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis – When The Bad Gets Worse

The increase in lipopolysaccharides absorption caused by a poor diet and an obesity-causing microbiome can disrupt the liver so much that NFLD progresses to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

This form of NFLD affects 20-30% of patients with NFLD, and it occurs when the build up of fat in the liver leads to inflammation that can result in liver cell damage.

The fat cells eventually become overloaded and begin to secrete inflammatory cytokines. These inflammatory cytokines increase inflammation levels and cause reactive oxygen species to accumulate (oxidative stress). As poor lifestyle choices continue, so much fat builds up in the liver that it leads to lipotoxicity (accumulation of fat in non-fat cells). The combination of lipotoxicity and oxidative stress can cause hormonal disturbances and liver damage.

In the gut NFLD promoting lifestyle changes the microbiome. This increases inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipopolysaccharide absorption, which causes more liver damage.

You are not doomed to get nonalcoholic steatohepatitis because like type 2 diabetes, obesity, and heart disease, NFLD is reversible with the same lifestyle changes.

How To Reverse Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

The key to disrupting the vicious cycle of NFLD before it damages the liver is exercise and diet.

Many scientific papers agree that the treatment of NFLD should be focused on controlling diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia. We should only focus on treating the liver in those with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

This means that the best way to reverse NFLD and prevent liver damage is with a diet that has been proven to control diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia.

The Ketogenic Diet May Be The Best Fatty Liver Diet

Weight loss is essential when reversing NFLD. The best way to achieve this weight loss, however, is not with caloric restriction.

The ketogenic diet has been proven to be more effective than a calorie-restricted diet at reversing type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, hyperlipidemia and NFLD.

A recent pilot study put five patients on the ketogenic diet (less than 20 grams per day of carbohydrate). Each patient underwent a liver biopsy, and four of the five patients showed a reduction in liver fat, inflammation, and fibrosis. This provides preliminary evidence that the ketogenic diet can reverse NFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

NFLD is so intimately associated with type 2 diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease that it is believed to be caused by the same factors. These factors are an unhealthy lifestyle, genetics, and gut health issues (an obesity and inflammation causing microbiome).

The combination of the ketogenic diet and exercise makes a great treatment for NFLD.

This Post has been condensed from the Keto: The best Fatty Liver Diet https://www.ruled.me/keto-best-fatty-liver-diet/

To learn more please read, How Do I Do the Ketogenic Diet? https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/04/13/how-do-i-do-the-ketogenic-diet/

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Ketone Supplements: The Pros and Cons

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Ketone supplements rapidly and transiently increase blood concentrations of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB). There is a flurry of new studies being reported, some positive, some neutral and some negative.

The different forms (salts vs. esters), what they are co-ingested with (carbohydrates vs no carbs, minerals), the background diet (ketogenic vs. high-carb), and dosing, timing, and adaptation periods are just a few of the important factors that may determine the metabolic responses to ketone supplements.

In preparation for this Post it is helpful to first understand: Keto-Adaptation. Here is the link.  https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2019/05/31/keto-adaptation-some-clues-to-its-complexity/

Ketones refer to the primary circulating fatty acid metabolites beta-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB) and acetoacetate (AcAc). More on ketone basics herehttps://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2019/03/15/drs-stephen-phinney-and-jeff-volek-on-the-basic-science-of-ketosis-and-keto-adaptation/

Shedding light on new methods of achieving ketosis:

  • Exogenous ketones (ketone supplements) and well-formulated ketogenic diets should not be assumed to have equivalent effects simply because they achieve similar BOHB blood levels.
  • For the past few million years, the only way for humans to make use of ketones for fuel was to restrict carbohydrates low enough and long enough to induce the liver to make them. An emerging alternative is to consume ketones as a dietary supplement.

Sources and Formulations of Exogenous Ketones

  • The source of most exogenous ketone supplements is chemical synthesis, which focuses on BOHB.
  • An important difference between endogenous (produced by your liver) and exogenous BOHB is that most synthetic BOHB used in dietary supplements is a mixture of the two ‘D’ and ‘L’ isomers, whereas endogenously produced BOHB consists of just the D-isomer. Metabolically, the two isomers are very different, and current published information indicates that most of the energy and signaling benefits of BOHB derive from the D-form. This is potentially problematic because the L-isomers are not metabolized via the same chemical pathways as the D-forms and it remains unclear whether humans can convert the L-form to the D-form.
  • Thus, while the L-isomers do not appear to be toxic, they are not likely to impart the same benefits as the D-forms.

Ketone Salts and Esters are two general formulations for dietary BOHB supplements – salts derived from the keto-acid or an ester formed between the keto-acid and an alcohol.

Ketone Salts: Salts typically utilize sodium, potassium, calcium, or magnesium. Given that recommended daily intakes of these various minerals range from a few hundred milligrams up to 5 grams, whereas the daily ketone intake goal to mimic nutritional ketosis blood levels would need to be on the order of 50 grams, achieving this goal with ketone salts would severely challenge human dietary mineral tolerance.

Most of the currently marketed ketone salt formulations are made with a mix of the D- and L-isomers of BOHB, so the actual delivered dose of the more desirable D-isomer is considerably less. The other concern with the salt formulations is that, as the salts of weak acids, they have an alkalinizing metabolic effect that might have a modest but cumulative effect on blood pH and renal function.

Ketone Esters are more appropriate for delivering higher doses of BOHB, but with repeated dosing can push the limits of taste and GI tolerance (loose bowels). This product has been shown to significantly reduce appetite after a single dose but its effect on body weight in humans over a longer period of time has not been studied, nor has its effect on blood glucose control been reported in humans with type 2 diabetes.

Comparison of ketone supplements (chemical ketosis) to nutritional ketosis

 The stimulus for the increase in ketones in response to a well-formulated ketogenic diet is the restriction of dietary carbohydrate, which triggers many favorable adaptations. Although both induce a form of ketosis, the lack of carbohydrate restriction in the context of using ketone supplements induces a different metabolic profile.

The blood levels of BOHB that can be achieved with the salts or ester formulations are in the 1-3 mM range, similar to what can be achieved with a well-formulated ketogenic diet in insulin sensitive humans. In more insulin resistant humans, the ester formulation may deliver higher blood levels than a sustainable diet.

In terms of epigenetic signaling, at levels of BOHB as low as 1 mM have potent effects. Furthermore, the association between very mild ketonemia (concentration of ketone bodies in the blood) and reduced coronary mortality with SGLT2 inhibitor use in patients with type 2 diabetes suggests that there might be clinical benefits with chronic BOHB levels as low as 0.3 mM.

That said, there also remains the question of the relative benefits of AcAc versus BOHB. AcAc generated in the liver acts as a NAD+ electron donor for the peripheral (aka non-liver), whereas pure BOHB taken orally potentially deprives the periphery of NAD+.

Another factor to consider is that in nutritional ketosis the liver makes a steady supply of ketones and continuously releases them into the circulation. In contrast, most ketone supplement protocols involve bolus intakes that don’t mimic the endogenous release pattern. The extent to which this impacts metabolic and signaling responses across different tissues remains unclear.

Some of the benefits of nutritional ketosis can be attributed to circulating levels of BOHB, and some of these benefits can accrue at blood levels at or even below 0.5 mM.

Practical Considerations in Prevention and Management of Chronic Disease

  • Until there is more definitive information, it will be difficult to specify the dosing and duration of supplemental ketones. However for fuel use, and very likely for exercise performance as well, sustained blood levels of BOHB in the range of 0.5 mM to 1.0 mM are likely to be required. This is achieved physiologically by an estimated ketone production of 50-100 grams per day in a keto-adapted human.
  • With the current ketone salt formulations, even 50 grams per day is likely above taste and physiologic mineral tolerances. So for these products, their potential benefits are likely limited to adding to existing blood ketone levels for someone already following a low carbohydrate diet.
  • For the ketone esters, on the other hand, repeated doses of 20-30 grams in any one day may be possible. Thus these products may be able to maintain a modest level of ketonemia without dietary carbohydrate restriction. Thus some of the cardiac and brain fueling benefits may follow, not to mention the epigenetic effects limiting oxidative stress and inflammation. But given the recent observation that administered ketone esters markedly reduce circulating free fatty acids – their sustained use in people with underlying insulin resistance may compromise their long-term benefits by promoting weight gain unless combined with carbohydrate restriction.
  • A drawback to the long-term use of ketone supplements is their poor palatability for the esters and their cost of about $1 per gram of delivered ketones for daily dosages from 25 to 100 grams.

Sports Performance:  There are enticing anecdotes of supplemental ketones being used to boost human physical performance in competitive events, notably among elite cyclists. Given that BOHB can deliver more energy per unit of oxygen consumed than either glucose or fatty acids, this makes sense. But what we do not know is if there is any required period of adaptation to the use of exogenous ketones, and thus how to employ them in training. It is clear that exogenous ketones decrease adipose tissue lipolysis and availability of fatty acids, the exact opposite to what happens on a well-formulated ketogenic diet. This distinction between exogenous ketones and ketogenic diets on adipose tissue physiology and human energy balance underscores an important reason why these two ketone-boosting strategies should not be conflated.

This Post has been condensed from the Virta Post, Ketone Supplements: The Pros and Cons – Shedding light on new methods of achieving ketosis by Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD and Jeff Volek, PhD, RD on March 12, 2018 https://blog.virtahealth.com/ketone-supplements/

More scientific information and Citations of the supporting studies are included in the Virta post.

Personally, I took ketone supplements for years. I finally lost the unwanted weight off and kept a healthy body fat percentage with the Ketogenic diet.

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Blog: https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.