Keto-Adaptation – Some Clues to Its Complexity

Human metabolism has evolved to be remarkably flexible in its ability to use a variety of dietary energy substrates. From a cultural history perspective, humans have demonstrated the ability to subsist for generations on up to 80% of dietary energy as carbohydrates at one end of the macronutrient spectrum to over 80% as fat (a ketogenic diet) at the other end. Given this wide range of dietary options, what is the optimum nutrient mix? Is one end of this spectrum better than the other? Or is it best to be somewhere in the middle? How long does human metabolism take to optimize its use of the dominant fuel provided? We know that a lot of disease symptoms and health indicators get much better soon after someone starts on a ketogenic diet.

Most people, including most nutrition scientists, appear to believe that the effects of a high fat diet can be determined after only a week or two. Thus most diet studies, particularly those assessing effects on physical performance, have typically been run for two weeks or less. And this is still the case, even though we published data over 3 decades ago showing that the process of adapting to a very low carbohydrate intake requires at least a month and likely quite a bit longer. How much longer? It depends upon what measure of adaptation one is following, and it is very likely that inter-individual variability is a factor as well.

While a ketogenic diet can put you into a state of nutritional ketosis in a matter of days, it can take weeks to months to become fully keto adapted.

How Long Does it Take to Optimize Ketone Metabolism?     Some assume that keto-adaptation occurs simultaneously with the build-up in the level of ‘ketones’ (beta-hydroxybutyrate) in the blood. This hypothesis is based on the assumption that all of the benefits of ketones are directly linked to the amount available in the circulation. But here’s the catch – in our controlled inpatient studies, blood levels of BOHB come up to a new steady state within a week of starting a ketogenic diet but one’s subjective and objective ability to do vigorous exercise takes anywhere from several weeks to a few months to recover and then stabilize. In other words, the process of keto-adaptation that allows for normal or increased exercise performance lags well behind the level of ketones in the blood.

The body’s ability to produce and defend muscle glycogen via gluconeogenesis can become finely tuned, but that this takes much longer than 4-6 weeks to occur.

Serum Uric Acid as a Biomarker for Keto-adaptation: An intriguing potential indicator of the body’s progress into keto-adaptation is the response of the serum uric acid content after initiation of a ketogenic diet. In healthy normal humans with initially normal blood uric acid levels, their values typically double in the first week of nutritional ketosis.

The figure below depicts the serum uric acid levels typical for a healthy person fed a moderate protein ketogenic diet for 12 weeks. The acute rise in the first week occurs simultaneously with the increase in blood ketones, but then the slow progressive decline occurs despite stable levels of dietary protein and blood ketones.

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In other words, the initial rise in blood uric acid appears linked to the onset of nutritional ketosis, but then the body slowly adapts back to normal uric acid clearance despite sustained ketones in the blood.So what gives?

The best available answer to this question is the following: to protect the body’s acid-base balance against too much acid from the diet or produced by our metabolism, our kidneys have the capacity to identify and actively clear organic acids from the blood. To some degree, at the onset of nutritional ketosis, this seems to be indiscriminate – it treats uric acid and non-toxic levels of ketones all the same. So at the start of nutritional ketosis, these two organic acids compete for excretion, causing blood uric acid to rise despite no increase in its production.

Over time the kidneys adapt to normalize uric acid excretion in the presence of beta-hydroxybutyrate, this process takes a few months to occur.

During this recovery in the kidney’s handling of organic acids, other aspects of the body’s energy regulation and homeostasis are undergoing similar slow changes as well with the net effect resulting in the process of ‘keto-adaptation’.

Does Keto-adaptation Increase Mitochondrial Density?         Another potential structural change that might directly contribute to keto-adaptation would be an increase in mitochondrial density in muscle, brain, and other oxidative tissues. The dramatic shift in energy metabolism towards fatty acid and ketone oxidation would be expected to enhance mitochondrial function. This could occur by increased mitochondrial biogenesis (production of new mitochondrial), decreased mitochondrial damage and autophagy (mitochondrial breakdown).

It is understood that reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause structural and functional damage to mitochondria, and that nutritional ketosis decreases mitochondrial ROS production. This could result in a prompt increase in the lifespan of existing mitochondria.

Keto-adaptation as a Complex of Changes on Varying Timelines: To be sure, when someone initiates a well-formulated ketogenic diet, a number of changes are set in motion which may occur in parallel, but with widely varying rates of completion.  (For these changes click the Virta link below.)

Bottom line: Keto-adaptation will likely be defined as the net effect of many parallel responses to a well-formulated ketogenic diet, with these various responses occurring on differing timelines, and to differing degrees across individual phenotypes/genotypes. The timeline for full keto-adaptation will likely be measured in months rather than days or weeks.

Have more questions about nutritional ketosis? Check out Nutritional Ketosis and Ketogenic Diet FAQ https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/11/02/nutritional-ketosis-and-ketogenic-diet-faq/

This Post has been condensed fromKeto-Adaptation by Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD and Jeff Volek, PhD, RD on January 23, 2018

https://blog.virtahealth.com/keto-adapted/

 I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

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Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

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Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

‘Bugs’ in the gut might predict Alzheimer’s/dementia disease

Alzheimer’s is one type of dementia and is a disease that affects the mind. It affects the whole brain and causes short-term memory loss, difficulty in communicating and thinking clearly, emotional instability and poor judgment. It mostly affects people over the age of 65, but is occurring more and more frequently in younger people too.

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Biological symptoms: Small protein bodies called amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles within the structure of the brain develop and cause the brain cells to die off. The amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles reduce the effectiveness of healthy neurons (nerve cells that carry messages to and from the brain) and destroy them.

People with Alzheimer’s also have a deficiency in neurotransmitters, the biogenic amines (compounds) that are involved in cellular communication. These compounds are adrenaline, dopamine, norepinephrine (noradrenaline), histamine and serotonin.

Possible Causes of Alzheimer’s:      Head Trauma and Brain Tumours, Genetics, Atrophy, Alcohol, Heart disease, Aspartame

Other causes of Dementia include reactions to medications, thyroid problems and other metabolic problems and endocrine abnormalities, nutritional deficiencies including dehydration, infections (including meningitis and encephalitis, untreated syphilis, and the advanced stages of AIDS), subdural hematomas or bleeding between the brain’s surface and its outer covering (the dura), poisoning (lead and other heavy metals, and aluminium), anoxia and hypoxia (diminished supply of oxygen to an organ’s tissues), and lung problems.

There is strong evidence to show a link between heart health and brain health. This is where the GAPS protocol comes in.

GAPS: In the book Put Your Heart in Your Mouth by Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride (the founder of GAPS, a diet and lifestyle regime), Dr Natasha says that in Alzheimer’s disease, the sufferer has excess glucose in the bloodstream. She explains that free molecules of glucose attach to proteins in the blood and cause them to become sticky. These substances are called AGEs – Advanced Glycosylated End products. AGEs can get into capillaries in the brain and block them (causing Alzheimer’s) as well as other parts of the body such as the kidney. When they stick to the blood vessels and damage them, they start the process of atherosclerosis, which can lead to a heart attack. Hence the connection. To address this problem, one part of GAPS is to avoid sugar.

Another part of GAPS is to decrease exposure to chemicals and toxic substances.  For example, in a higher acidic gut environment (such as that produced by sugar) absorption of aluminium has been shown to increase significantly. In individuals with impaired kidney function (such as those who maintain high glucose levels in their blood), dialysis dementia is likely to develop. John Yudkin found that sugar consumption caused the liver and kidneys to increase in size (inflammation). Other researchers have shown that high blood sugar can overwork the kidneys, causing them to stop working properly. If the kidneys aren’t working properly, they won’t be able to excrete aluminium efficiently.

The GAPS book, Put Your Heart in Your Mouth, is available at https://www.amazon.ca/Put-Your-Heart-Mouth-Atherosclerosis/dp/095485201X

This Post has been condensed from What causes Alzheimer’s Disease?http://simplefoodremedies.blogspot.com/2013/01/what-causes-alzheimers-disease.html

‘Bugs’ in the gut might predict dementia in the brain  DALLAS, Jan. 30, 2019 — The makeup of bacteria and other microbes in the gut may have a direct association with dementia risk, according to preliminary research to be presented in Honolulu at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2019, a world premier meeting for researchers and clinicians dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease.

Researchers studying the population of bacteria and microbes in the intestines, known as gut microbiota, have found these “bugs” impact risks for diseases of the heart and more. Japanese researchers studied 128 (dementia and non-dementia) patients’ fecal samples and found differences in the components of gut microbiota in patients with the memory disorder suggesting that what’s in the gut influences dementia risk much like other risk factors.

The analysis revealed that fecal concentrations of ammonia, indole, skatole and phenol were higher in dementia patients compared to those without dementia. But levels of Bacteroides – organisms that normally live in the intestines and can be beneficial – were lower in dementia patients.

“Although this is an observational study and we assessed a small number of the patients, the odds ratio is certainly high suggesting that gut bacteria may be a target for the prevention of dementia,” said Naoki Saji, M.D., Ph.D., study author and vice director of the Center for Comprehensive Care and Research on Memory Disorders, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology in Japan.

This Post has been condensed from ‘Bugs’ in the gut might predict dementia in the brainhttps://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-01/aha-it012519.php

How the Bacteria in Our Gut Influences Our Minds

The gut is able to communicate with the brain via the vagus nerve – a cranial nerve extending from the brainstem to the abdomen via the heart, esophagus and lung – known as the gut-brain axis. Ninety percent of the fibers in the vagus carry information from the gut to the brain.

The human body has around 4 pounds of gut bacteria. When these bacteria become imbalanced, it can lead to unwanted symptoms, such as: Gas, Bloating, Diarrhea, Joint pain, Weight gain or loss, Headaches, Rashes, Memory problem, Painful periods, Fatigue, Poor sleep.

An imbalance of beneficial versus harmful gut bacteria, known as “dysbiosis,” has been linked to a number of psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as autism, anxiety, depression and stress. It may even play a role in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’sand Parkinson’s disease. This suggests a person’s stomach or intestinal distress can be the cause or the product of anxiety, stress, or depression.

As a result amyloid and tau can accumulate in the brain for 10 – 20 years before Alzheimer’s symptoms begin.

This Post has been condensed from https://theheartysoul.com/how-gut-bacteria-influences-brain/?utm_source=JERF&utm_content=80713-IRN4&fbclid=IwAR3jgwcbb5xFATunOPyVGhZiddOmk8v8nOdo6PWeahxwtWdIn1uHkOWQb5A

Want more detail, please read this scientific study:

The Brain-Gut-Microbiome Axis  – Preclinical and clinical studies have shown bidirectional interactions within the brain-gut-microbiome axis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6047317/

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise. 

I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

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May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

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Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes with Bariatric Surgery, Very Low Calorie Diets, and Carbohydrate Restriction: A Review of the Evidence

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has long been thought of as a progressive, incurable chronic disease, largely because traditional means of treatment have had limited potential to reverse the disease.

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Newer research suggests reversal is possible through three methods: bariatric surgery, low calorie diets (LCDs), very low calorie diets (VLCDs) and carbohydrate restriction.

Sarah Hallberg, DO, MS of Virta Health recently published a review of 99 original articles examining the evidence for type 2 diabetes reversal using each of the three reversal methods. We have included the advantages and limitations of each summarized below.

Defining diabetes reversal.      We have defined reversal as maintaining an HbA1c below 6.5% without the use of glycemic control medications. Metformin was excluded from this criteria because it is not specific to diabetes.

Diabetes reversal intervention 1: Bariatric surgery:     The most commonly performed bariatric surgeries in the U.S. include laparoscopic and robotic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) or Sleeve Gastrectomy (SG). Anatomically, they both decrease the size of the stomach with RYGB also diverting the small intestine. Bariatric surgery has also been shown to cause alterations in GI hormone releases that may impact eating, hunger, and satiety as well as affect gut microbiota populations.

Advantages of bariatric surgery:

  • Unilateral improvement in glycemia following operation
  • High rates of T2D remission compared to the non-surgical groups
  • Three-year remission rates of up to 68.7% after RYGB
  • Rapid blood glucose improvements (within hours to days), which likely represents the enteroendocrine responses to altered flow of intestinal contents (i.e., bile acid signaling and changes in microbiota and their metabolome).

Disadvantages of bariatric surgery:

  • Surgery of any type can be associated with complications leading to morbidity or mortality. Complication rates have been stated to be as high as 13% and 21% for SG and RYGB, respectively.
  • Significant financial costs of an average of $14,389US.
  • Increased likelihood of long-term adverse events.Major adverse events included medication intolerance, need for reoperation, infection, anastomotic leakage, and venous and thromboembolic events.

Diabetes reversal intervention 2: Low calorie diets (LCDs).      Several studies have reported successful weight loss with decreased insulin resistance and medication use following a LCD or a VLCD.  Total calories per day in studies for VLCDs range from 400-800kcal.  LCDs range from 825-1800 kcal per day and the higher range has been shown to be significantly less effective. Research suggests that LCDs are effective in reversing diabetes in the short term (up to two years), especially in patients with a more recent diabetes diagnosis.

Advantages of LCDs:

  • Quick improvements in glycemic control.A low-calorie diet of 900 kcal, including 115 g of protein, led to significant improvement in glycemic control attributed to improvements in insulin sensitivity.
  • Effective in the short term.A VLCD and gastric bypass surgery were equally effective in achieving weight loss and improving glucose and HbA1c levels in obese patients with T2D in the short term. DiRECT (Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial), a community-based cluster-randomized clinical trial with 306 relatively healthy participants with T2D (given an 825 kcal/day formula for 3-5 months) found that at one year, 46% of patients met the study criteria of diabetes remission (HbA1c <6.5% without antiglycemic medications). This dropped to 36% at two-years.

Disadvantages of LCDs and VLCDs:

  • Overall difficult to sustain.In one study, weight loss persisted in the diet-treated patients only for the first three months, indicating difficulties with long-term maintenance. Other studies also reported similar pattern of early blood glucose normalization without medication use, but the improvements were not sustained long-term. One study showed that while a VLCD normalized glucose levels within a week; however at 12 weeks over a quarter of the patients had an early recurrence of diabetes with an average weight regain of 20%.
  • Requires substantial caloric restriction. A substantial level of calorie restriction is needed to generate enough weight loss to reverse diabetes. Short-term interventions with moderate energy restriction with metformin (which led to modest weight loss) were less effective in reversing diabetes than standard diabetes care.
  • Severe energy restriction may have negative long-term effects.Studies have suggested that the body undergoes physiological and metabolic adaptation in response to caloric restriction, and this may shift one’s energy balance and hormonal regulation of weight toward weight regain after weight loss.

Diabetes reversal intervention 3: Carbohydrate restriction:    Before insulin was discovered in 1921, low carbohydrate (LC) diets were the standard of care for diabetes. With the emergence of exogenous insulin, the goal became to maintain blood sugar control through the use of medications instead of preventing elevations in blood glucose by restricting carbohydrates in the diet. In response to recent studies, the idea of preventing blood sugar elevations with carbohydrate restriction has found its way back into the mainstream standard of care.

A low carbohydrate diet typically restricts carbs to less than 130 grams per day, and a ketogenic diet to 20-50 grams per day.

Advantages of carbohydrate restriction:

  • Highly effective.In our published trial providing significant support through the use of a continuous care intervention (CCI), we examined using a low carbohydrate diet in patients with T2D, compared with usual care T2D patients. At one year, the HbA1c decreased by 1.3% in the CCI, with 60% of completers achieving a HbA1c below 6.5% without hypoglycemic medication (excluding metformin). Insulin was reduced or eliminated in 94% of users. Most cardiovascular risk factors showed significant improvement. Improvements were not observed in the usual care patients. Another 34-week trial found that a ketogenic diet intervention (20–50 g net carbs per day) resulted in HbA1c below the threshold for diabetes in 55% of the patients, compared to 0% of patients in the low-fat group.
  • Does not require calorie restriction.Patients are instructed to carefully restrict dietary carbohydrates, eat protein in moderation, and consume dietary fats to satiety.
  • Sustainable with support. The one-year retention rate in our continuous care intervention was 83%, indicating that a non-calorie-restricted, low carbohydrate intervention can be sustained.
  • More cost-effective than bariatric surgery.
  • More effective than restricting overall calories.A study comparing a non-calorie restricted, very low carbohydrate (<20g total) diet to an energy-restricted low-glycemic diet in patients with T2D found a greater reduction in HbA1c, weight, and insulin levels in the low carbohydrate group. 95% of participants in the low carbohydrate group reduced or eliminated glycemic control medications, compared to 62% in the low glycemic index group at 24 weeks.A small (34 participants) one-year study of an eat to satiety on a very low carbohydrate diet compared to a calorie-restricted moderate carbohydrate diet found a significant reduction in HbA1c between groups, favoring the low carbohydrate group.

Disadvantages of carbohydrate restriction:

  • Often requires support. Many of these trials included an educational component, and determining the appropriate method of support may be key to the overall success with disease reversal.
  • Results are promising, but longer-term follow-up studies are needed. Follow up studies have shown sustainability at two years, so longer-term studies are needed to determine the sustainability beyond that.

This Post has been condensed from Reversing Type 2 Diabetes with Bariatric Surgery, Very Low Calorie Diets, and Carbohydrate Restriction: A Review of the Evidence

Sarah Hallberg, DO, MS on April 8, 2019. Please copy and paste this link into your search bar  https://blog.virtahealth.com/reversing-type-2-diabetes-bariatric-surgery-low-calorie-diets-carbohydrate-restriction/

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

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Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

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Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Key Dietary Strategies to Protect Yourself from Alzheimer’s

Highlights:

  • Diets high in carbohydrates, and diets low in healthy fats, lead to Alzheimer’s disease
  • Diets high in carbohydrates are associated with an 89 % increased risk for dementia. High-fat diets are associated with a 44 % reduced risk
  • Alzheimer’s is directly related to chronically elevated blood sugar levels
  • Diabetes doubles your risk for Alzheimer’s disease
  • You can regenerate cells in your brain’s memory center through a process called neurogenesis.
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Saturated Fats Are a Critical Part of a Heart- and Brain-Healthy Diet. Saturated fat is needed to have good cholesterol in your body.

Dr. Perlmutter cites a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, which found that women who are given cholesterol-lowering statin medication have a 44 % increased risk for becoming a type 2 diabetic.Diabetes, in turn, doubles your risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s Is Directly Related to Elevated Blood Sugar Levels.     A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in August 2013 demonstrates that even mild elevation of blood sugar – a level of around 105 or 110 mg/dl – was associated with an elevated risk for becoming demented.

Dr. Perlmutter believes the ideal fasting blood sugar level is around 70-85. People who are keto-adapted (eating low-carb, high-fat) are burning fat and they can get by with much lower blood sugar.

Your brain does not need sugar. The brain loves to burn fat, specifically ketones, which your body produces by metabolizing your fat.

Eat the Right Types of Fat:             Healthy fats include Avocados, Butter made from raw, grass-fed organic milk, Raw dairy, Organic pastured egg yolks, Coconuts and coconut oil, Unheated organic nut oils, Raw nuts, such as pecans and macadamia, which are low in protein and high in healthy fats, and Grass-fed meats. Avoid all trans fats or hydrogenated fats i.e. margarine, vegetable oils, and butter-like spreads.

Our ancestral diet was very high in saturated fats and virtually void of non-vegetable carbohydrates. Our bodies were not designed to eat carbs are refined and highly processed and foods that are genetically engineered grains and sugar (GMO sugar beets and corn). 

This underpins almost every health malady that we are trying to deal with today.

Exercise reduces free radical production and inflammation,both of which are drivers for chronic disease. Exercise has been shown to turn on a brain growth hormone called BDNF, (brain-derived neurotrophic factor). BDNF codes for your brain’s ability to both repair itself and grow new brain cells.

Dr. Perlmutter recommends high-intensity interval training (HIIT), which provides you with the equivalent of two hours of conventional aerobic exercise in just 20 minutes.

Learn more at 15 minutes of resistance weight training is all the exercise I need for the week to build muscle.

https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com/2018/05/25/15-minutes-of-resistance-weight-training-is-all-the-exercise-i-need-for-the-week-to-build-muscle/

Dr. Perlmutter’s Grain Brain program includes other recommendations, not limited to:

  • Turmeric, for its anti-inflammatory potential and ability to activate BDNF for brain health.
  • An optimal vitamin D level of around 70-90 nanograms per milliliter (ng/ml) year-round.
  • Optimizing your gut health by reseeding your gut with beneficial bacteria (probiotics).
  • Avoid antibiotics and eating CAFO meats (concentrated animal feeding operations)which provide you with traces of antibiotics in each bite. These antibiotics kill beneficial bacteria.
  • Measuring your gluten sensitivity with a Cyrex [Array 3] test.Dr. Fasano discovered that gluten can also make your blood-brain barrier leaky.

A high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet is not just for the treatment of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. It’s the right diet for ALL brain-related disorders. 

Choose above-ground vegetables which, include kale, chard, collards, broccoli, and spinach. These also contain plenty of healthy fiber – you really do not need grains.

Choose grass-fed products – wild fish, pasture-raised chicken, and farm-raised or pasture-raised eggs.

This Post has been condensed from Key Dietary Strategies to Protect Yourself from Alzheimer’s https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/04/27/diet-alzheimers-disease.aspx

 I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

 I will bring you compelling articles on Ketogenic and GAPS diets, the Super Slow High-Intensity Exercise Program and supplements.

To follow my Blog, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

I thrive on feedback. Please let me know you are interested in the content by clicking Like, Commenting or sending me a message or email about the Post.

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May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

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Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Stomach Acid – Do You Have Too Much or Too Little? How To Correct it Naturally?

Have you experienced a inflamed oesophagus, bad breath, bloating and belching, feeling or being sick, difficulty swallowing, pain when swallowing, a sore throat and hoarseness, a persistent cough or wheezing, which may be worse at night, tooth decay and gum disease.

Acid reflux is a burning sensation in the chest caused by stomach acid travelling up towards your throat.

The way the system is supposed to work is that stomach acid breaks proteins into amino acids.  The amino acids go downstream, are absorbed, and the body makes its own proteins.

When you don’t have stomach acid, whole proteins get absorbed.  The immune system recognizes that it didn’t make those proteins and assumes they are viruses.  It makes antibodies to these food proteins.  Soon you are allergic to the foods you most commonly eat.  You feel bad after every meal as your body attacks your food and as a result you feel tired about 30 minutes after you eat.

Your system tries to isolate these proteins and often stores them in fat—thus you gain weight.

The antibodies make your blood sticky.  This increases your risk of blood clots and makes it hard for the blood to pick up and deliver oxygen.  As your body oxygen levels drop, your metabolism gets worse and anaerobic microorganisms, (that do not need oxygen to survive), begin to grow.

This process often starts with GERD (gastro-esophageal reflux disease).  When you don’t make enough stomach acid, you develop gas as your stomach tries to digest your food.  These gas bubbles are surrounded by stomach acid.  The bubbles float up into your esophagus and you belch. You taste stomach acid and your esophagus burns.

Thus you think you have too much stomach acid when the real problem is that you have too little.

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Your stomach feels better when you take antacids and/or drugs that shut down your stomach acid.  However, this insures that you will develop chronic disease!  You will become allergic to your proteins.  In addition, the body cannot absorb zinc without stomach acid.  Without zinc, you cannot make neurochemicals like serotonin, so you become depressed.  Zinc is also necessary for over 360 known biochemical reactions including proper prostate function.

Stomach acid is your “front door”.  It is intended to help kill infectious things like bacteria, fungus and parasites.  Without it, they have an open invitation to invade your body

These problems begin when you can’t make enough stomach acid.  Making stomach acid requires iodine, zinc, and vitamin B1 as well as water, salt, and CO2.  Almost everyone is deficient in iodine and about 80% of the population is deficient in zinc.  Many are deficient in the B vitamins.  Thus we have another reason for so many to be depressed and tired from reacting to their foods and obese as well.

The solution is to correct your stomach’s ability to make stomach acid by correcting these deficiencies.  This usually takes 3-4 months. During that time, take Betaine HCl that acts like stomach acid. You should eat a few bites of food before you take it so it won’t aggravate your stomach.  Take it with each meal until you have time to correct your iodine, B1 and zinc levels. Do not take it beyond the 3-4 months.

This Post has been condensed from Dr. Jerry Tennant’s article, Stomach Acid, https://tennantpastoral.us/stomach-acid

Dr. Tennant has been acknowledged by his peers by awarding him Top 20 Alternative Doctors in America and more.

The goal is to correct your stomach’s ability to make stomach acid.  

Dr McBride says, take Betaine HCl only with main meals when fats and meats in the meal will bind it.  Don’t take Betaine HCl permanently, it is a temporary measure.  

She says it is always more difficult to digest food in the evenings, so try to avoid eating late and make it mostly vegetables (less meat and fat).

To restore your normal stomach acid production, Dr. McBride recommends a stomach acidity stimulator: cabbage juice, fresh cabbage salad or a small helping of sauerkraut 5-10 minutes before the meal, then the stomach will be ready and full of acid. If this measure is not enough, then use Betaine HCl &Pepsin with large meals only.

GAPS recommended source of Betaine HCl  https://www.shop.gapsdiet.com/product.sc?productId=15&categoryId=5

Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride is a medical doctor with two postgraduate degrees: Master of Medical Sciences in Neurology and Master of Medical Sciences in Human Nutrition.

She graduated as a medical doctor in Russia. After practicing for five years as a Neurologist and three years as a Neurosurgeon she started a family and moved to the UK, where she got her second postgraduate degree in Human Nutrition.

She is well known for developing a concept of GAPS (Gut And Psychology Syndrome). Thousands of people around the world follow the highly successful GAPS Nutritional Protocol to help themselves and their families. You can learn about GAPS on www.gaps.me

I invite you to Follow my Blog, Facebook or be added to my email distribution list. My focus is to maximize my physical performance and mental clarity, body composition, and most importantly overall health with a wholesome diet and exercise.

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May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

416-428-5285

Email: lpolstra@bell.net

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Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.