Stress 101: Causes, Symptoms & Coping Strategies

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Hans Selye, MD was endocrinologist known for his studies of the effects of stress on the human body.  He concluded that to reduce stress we must adopt habits that minimize stressful demands.

He discovered that the body’s ability to control or reduce the stress has limits. This limited ability to adapt to stress is even more noticeable when the body is exposed to the stressor continuously.

General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS):

Stage 1: Alarm reaction

The immediate reaction to a stressor, is the “flight or fight response”. The body perceives a stressor as a threat or danger and releases stress hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol. These hormones enable the body to perform activities beyond the range of normal ability.

Stage 2: Resistance

This occurs after the body has responded to a stressor, and the stress level has been reduced or removed. The body’s defenses become weaker, as it needs to divert energy to the damaged tissues and lower the production of stress hormones.

The body remains vigilant, especially when the stressors persist and the body is required to fight them continuously, although the response is weaker than the initial response.

Stage 3: Exhaustion

With long-term exposure to a stressor, the body starts to lose the ability to combat the stressor and to reduce its harmful impact; the adaptive energy is drained. It leads to “burnout” or “stress overload,” the individual is vulnerable to health problems. Catastrophic disease may occur.

How Stress Affects The Body

  1. Musculoskeletal system

When the body is stressed, muscles become tense; it’s an automatic response, the body’s way of guarding against injury and pain. With the sudden onset of stress, the muscles tense all at once, then release their tension when the stress passes.

Chronic stresscauses the body to be in a constant state of guardedness. When muscles are tense over a long period of time, it may trigger other reactions of the body and promote stress-related disorders. Tension-type and migraine headaches are associated with chronic muscle tension in the area of the shoulders, neck, and head.

Relaxation techniques have been shown to effectively reduce muscle tension, decrease the incidence of certain stress-related disorders, such as headache, and increase a sense of well-being.

  1. Respiratory system

Stress can affect your breathing patterns and your respiratory system. For those with asthma or a lung disease such as emphysema, getting the oxygen needed to breathe can be difficult, the stress can actually trigger asthma attacks.

  1. Cardiovascular system

The heart and blood vessels work together to provide nourishment and oxygen throughout the body, and they play an important role in the stress response. Acute stress causes an increase in heart rate and stronger contractions of the heart muscle. The stress hormones (adrenaline, cortisol and noradrenaline) mediate the response.

Blood vessels to the large muscles and the heart dilate, increasing the amount of blood flow to those parts of the body and elevating blood pressure. Once the acute stress is removed, the body returns to its normal state.

Chronic, long-term stress can contribute to problems of the heart and blood vessels.The consistent increase in blood pressure and heart rate, as well as the higher level of circulating stress hormones, take a toll on health. They increase the risk of hypertension (high blood pressure), heart attack and stroke.

Recurrent acute and persistent chronic stress can contribute to inflammation in the circulatory system, especially the coronary arteries.It is believed that it’s such inflammation that ties stress to heart attacks. Chronic stress can also elevate total cholesterol levels.

How Stress Affects Your Health

The stress response is automatic, developed in our ancestors to protect them from predators. Faced with danger, stress hormones flood the body, boosting energy, and readying it to fight the problem. People face multiple challenges every day. Regardless of the source of the stress, the body reacts in much the same way.

When stress interferes with daily life for an extended period of time, it gradually takes a greater and greater toll on the body and mind, leading to fatigue, inability to concentrate, and irritable mood. Chronic stress can cause disease, either because of changes in the body or because of the overeating, smoking, and other high-risk behaviors people employ to cope with stress. Job strain is associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease. Depression and low levels of social support increase risk for cardiovascular disease. When illness occurs, stress can make it harder to recover.

What To Do

Reducing stress makes a person feel better immediately, and can help protect health long-term.

Some simple methods for reducing stress include:

  1. Identify what’s causing the stress. Be aware of your state of mind throughout the day. If you feel stressed, write down the cause, your thoughts and mood. When you know what’s bothering you, you can develop a plan for coping. That may mean more realistic expectations of yourself and others, and perhaps asking for help with your job or your home. Determine your priorities and eliminate nonessential tasks. Make sure you have some time each day that is your own and nobody else’s.
  1. Build strong relationships. Relationships can be a source of stress or serve as stress relievers. Reach out to family members and close friends. They can offer practical advice, emotional support and perhaps a different perspective on the stressor.
  1. Walk away. When you’re angry, walk away and reconsider before you react.
  1. Physical activity can help you work off steam. It’s a natural stress-reliever and increases endorphins. Commit to a daily walk or other form of exercise.
  1. Rest your mind. Stress interferes with sleep. Practice good sleep hygiene and try to get the recommended 7-8 hours of sleep per night. Cut back on caffeine and stimulating activity. Eliminate the use of computers or television before bed; even better, take them out of the bedroom entirely. Yoga and relaxation exercises will help to reduce stress and boost the immune system.
  1. Get help from a professional. A mental health professional can teach you how to identify situations or behaviors that act as stressors. Develop an action plan for change.

SOURCE Stress 101: Causes, Symptoms & Coping Strategies: https://adrenalfatiguesolution.com/stress-101/

To learn more please refer to the book: Stress Without Distress by Hans Selye

HelpGuide.org has several excellent Posts that provide tips to dealing with stress. Here is the link https://www.helpguide.org/home-pages/stress.htm

Please consider following Lydia’s Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

 I Post the same Posting in Facebook https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/and to my mailing list. In this Blog and FB you can search using key words.

In this Blog I discuss the Ketogenic and GAPS (for gut health) diets, supplements and Super-slow High Resistance Training.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics. 

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Nutritional Ketosis, Treating Type 2 Diabetes

Nutritional ketosis is a natural metabolic state in which your body adapts to burning fat rather than carbohydrates. It is clinically proven to directly reduce blood sugar (HbA1c), improve insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) and reduce inflammation (as measured by white blood cell count and CRP).

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Dr. Phinney answers viewer’s questions:

Q: I am interested in reversing type 2 diabetes – is a ketogenic diet recommended?? Thx! —Susie T.

Dr. Phinney’s Answer: Insulin resistance is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes and manifests as carbohydrate intolerance. Like other food intolerances, the most logical and effective approach to managing carbohydrate intolerance is to restrict sugars and starches to within the individual’s metabolic tolerance. A well-formulated ketogenic diet can not only prevent and slow down progression of type 2 diabetes, it can actually resolve all the signs and symptoms in many patients, in effect reversing the disease as long as the carbohydrate restriction is maintained.

For complete answers to this and the other questions please copy and paste this link into your address bar

https://blog.virtahealth.com/ketogenic-nutrition-type-2-diabetes-dr-steve-phinney/

Q: Appreciated your article on the concerns about prolonged fasting. Could you comment on the utility and safety of shorter durations of fasting (i.e. 16 hrs of fasting/8 hrs of eating or 20 hrs of fasting/4 hrs of eating over a period of 1 day)? —Anonymous

Q: Can you achieve this on a vegetarian diet too? A lot of people I know from India, including my wife, are vegetarian and prediabetic or T2D. I am a T1 and now on keto diet, but I am not able to convince the vegetarians to eat meat. —Anonymous

Q: Does the amount of fat I eat in a ketogenic diet interfere with my ability to burn body fat? —Marcos C.

Q: Why are blood ketone values lower in the morning than in the afternoon/evening? —Nikola S.

Q: When I started my cholesterol was fine. Now my glucose has dropped 40%, but my cholesterol is 241. Should I be worried? —Kerry J.

 Q: Since families often (and should!) eat together, is there any concern about children who are eating high fat diets at breakfast and dinner with their ketogenic parents, but higher carb foods at lunch/snacks at school? —Tera N.

 Q: What are your inflammation biomarkers? —Tekla B.

 Q: Can long-term keto diet contribute to hypothyroidism? —Sonia Z.

 Q: Why some people’s LDL goes sky high on keto diet? —Sonia Z.

Dr. Phinney: The changes we see in total and LDL cholesterol levels are much less predictable than the changes in triglycerides and HDL cholesterol. For the full answer click the link below.

Q: There is a lot of concern about protein intake and gluconeogenesis kicking people out of ketosis. As stated in your book, moderate protein is .6-1 gram/pound of lean body mass. As long as you stay within that protein range is GNG something to be concerned about? —James F.

 Q: Does Diazoxide helps in the ketone production? Thanks a lot for sharing your knowledge. Your influence is bigger than you think. —Salomon J.

 Q: Does athlete fat oxidation rate vary continuously with carb intake? Or is keto the only way to get it above 0.5g/min?—Norman T.

 Q: My daughter has high uric acid on KD, we don’t know if she did before KD, have you seen this before?—Justine L.

 Dr. Phinney: Yes, blood levels of uric acid usually double in the first week of a ketogenic diet or with fasting. This is because there is a competition between ketones and uric acid for excretion by the kidneys early in adaptation. As the adaptation process proceeds over a few months, the uric acid level comes down to normal levels even as nutritional ketosis continues, Thus this is a process of clearance (i.e., excretion), not over-production from dietary protein, and this temporary elevation in uric acid is usually harmless unless one is prone to gout. That said, the precursors of uric acid are pretty high in organ meats like liver and kidney, so if these are part of one’s diet, they should be eaten in moderation. You can learn more about keto-adaptation here.

Q: Thoughts on patients suffering from depression and/or hypothyroidism and keto diets? Also, interested in your thoughts on “The Fast Metabolism Diet” by Haylie Pomroy, which encourages a 5x/day eating plan, which includes a couple days of a keto-like diet after some carb and protein-heavy days each week over the course of a month. Thank you for what you do, sir. Appreciate your work. —Tyler S. 

Q: Love your and Dr. Volek’s low carb performance book – amongst the ‘good’ fats you talk about high-oleic safflower being acceptable (better PUFA ratio). Are high-oleic SUNflower oils OK and can you cook with them? —Chris B.

 Q: Could blood ketones, along with blood sugars, be used to fine-tune insulin dosing? Too little insulin with someone with type 1 and we get DKA. With too little insulin ketones disappear. Could we use ketone levels are consistently below 0.3mmol/L as a signal that we have too much basal insulin? —Marty K.

 Q: Does Virta know the benefit of whey protein for diabetes? Not sure in the context specifically of DM, but it is a very high quality protein source – BCAA, immunoglobulins —Salomon J.

 Q: Why NOT eat certain oils, such as safflower and sunflower oil? Do these oils impact ketosis or is it for other reasons? —India K.

Q: Can you please explain hair loss on Keto? —Jessy G.

Q: Thanks for all you do!! There are groups that advocate the potassium to sodium ratio at 4 grams to 1 gram per day. Does that fit into your view of those two. Also, is 400 milligrams of Magnesium appropriate? Thank you! My ketone level ranges from .3 to 1.2. —Mark K.

 Q: Are you looking at Cardiac Calcium Score? —Lincoln C.

 Q: Hi Dr. Phinney. I have chronic pain and take a lot of medications. Also have controlled type 2 diabetes. Do you think taking 4400mg of gabapentin a day could be why I am not losing weight that easily. I am eating under 30 grams of carbs a day and I don’t eat a lot of fat. I eat just twice a day, and only around 950-975 calories. Thank You! —Teresa R.

 Q: While someone pursuing a therapeutic ketogenic diet for the management of cancer, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s or dementia may want to reduce protein to achieve elevated ketone levels, do you think someone trying to manage diabetes or lose weight needs to consciously worry about “too much protein” or can they just follow their appetite when it comes to protein intake? —Marty K.

 Q: If you are trying to reduce saturated fat but maintain ketosis, what fat sources do you recommend? —Gail K.

For answers to the questions above please copy and paste this link into your address bar

https://blog.virtahealth.com/ketogenic-nutrition-type-2-diabetes-dr-steve-phinney/

For more information please refer to the book that Dr. Phinney and Dr. Volek co-authored the New York Times Best Selling “The New Atkins for a New You” published in March 2010. Available at https://www.amazon.ca/New-Atkins-You-Ultimate-Shedding/dp/1439190275/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539113181&sr=8-1&keywords=The+New+Atkins+for+a+New+You

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/2healthyhabits/

The Art and Science of Low Carb Living: Cardio-Metabolic Benefits and Beyond

Dr. Volek’s most significant line of work has been a series of studies performed over the last 15 years aimed at better understanding what constitutes a well formulated low carbohydrate diet and their impact on obesity, body composition, adaptations to training and overall metabolic health.

Dr. Volek does not just write about his research, he actually uses it. A former athlete and competitive powerlifter, he continues to follow the principles of a diet low in carbohydrate while training regularly for strength and health.

He was co-author, with Dr. Phinney, of the New York Times Best Selling “The New Atkins for a New You” published in March 2010. Available at https://www.amazon.ca/New-Atkins-You-Ultimate-Shedding/dp/1439190275/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539113181&sr=8-1&keywords=The+New+Atkins+for+a+New+You

The following screen prints are from his seminar: ‘The Art and Science of Low Carb Living: Cardio-Metabolic Benefits and Beyond’.

Did you know that the ketone level when you are in Ketosis is not the same as Keto-acidosis?

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 These print screens are from Dr. Volek’s Keto Adaption I seminar.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSKDsI0i2uM

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The balance of the seminar is in this link, Jeff Volek – Keto Adaptation II     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29NSBaCr500

I hope this has been helpful as you continue on your journey to improved health.

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

If you wish to contact me by Email, please email lpolstra@bell.net using this form.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

How Much Protein Do You Need In Nutritional Ketosis?

The body’s protein metabolism is incredibly dynamic, and limitations in either dietary protein or energy intakes from carbohydrate or fat can tip the balance between gain or loss.

When embarking on a well-formulated ketogenic diet and going through the process of keto-adaptation, there are necessary changes in how the body uses its incoming macronutrients to maintain health and function. To achieve this requires enough protein but not too much.

These tips can help you make your low-carb lifestyle sustainable over the long term.

PROTEIN TURNOVER is going on in every cell, tissue, and organ in the body every day. So in order to maintain your health and function, the body needs to be constantly making new proteins. This requires a consistent supply of amino acids and lots of energy, because making new proteins (aka protein synthesis) is a high-energy process.

The amino acids that the body uses for protein synthesis come from two sources. The most obvious is the dietary protein that we eat each day, but this is normally the lesser contributor of amino acids for protein synthesis. The major source is actually recycled amino acids from the breakdown of existing body protein.

In a typical day when dietary protein and energy intakes are adequate to maintain lean body mass (non-fat mass) more than two-thirds of the amino acids entering the bloodstream come from breakdown of existing body protein, while less than one-third come from digestion and absorption of dietary protein.

Most of the body’s physiological functions are performed by our lean tissue. These functions are dependent upon having adequate amino acids so that they can rebuild themselves on an ongoing basis, and anything that impairs this rebuilding process over just a few weeks or a few months results in measurable losses of lean tissue and of a broad range of functions.

FACTORS AFFECTING PROTEIN BALANCE:  In our dreams, most of us would like to be able to rapidly gain lots of muscle and lose lots of body fat.

But in reality, if each morning we wake up with about the same amount of muscle as we had yesterday, we have been able keep protein synthesis and breakdown about in balance, and that’s a good result.When it comes to changes in our protein metabolism, good things happen slowly.

Factors Known To Stimulate Or Facilitate Lean Tissue Gain:

  • Exercise (particularly resistance exercise)
  • Adequate dietary protein including adequate essential amino acids **
  • Adequate dietary energy (but not necessarily carbohydrate)
  • Increased serum insulin (in the presence of adequate amino acids)
  • Branched chain amino acids.
  • Adequate intra-cellular minerals (e.g., potassium, magnesium, phosphorus)
  • Creatine supplements
  • Illegal use of anabolic steroids and growth hormone

** Essential amino acids are usually only a concern with vegan diets. Learn about food sources in this link https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/essential-amino-acids#bottom-line

Most positive changes in lean body mass occur slowly (an average of a quarter pound per day), whereas losses can occur rapidly with injury, illness, or inadequate dietary protein (including starvation/fasting).  In addition, proteins can only be produced when a number of the factors are working together, including amino acid availability and associated minerals specific to that tissue.

Nutritional ketosis and protein balance:  We have known for many decades that lean body mass and physical well-being can be maintained with a ketogenic diet containing a moderate amount of protein. The 1928 Stefansson Bellevue Experiment demonstrated that 2 adult men could eat about 15% of their dietary energy as protein and maintain their weight and function for a year. These finding were supported by short studies completed by Phinney 1983 and Volek 2004.

In our (Virta) experience, people on a ketogenic diet who think they are eating protein in moderation are often well above the recommended amount due to fear of eating fat to satiety. The result is a reduction in blood ketone levels caused by excess dietary protein. Too low protein consumption does not take allow for recovery from illness, calorie restriction, stress, or aging.

MACROS VS. PERCENTAGES:  An individual’s protein intake during a well-formulated ketogenic diet is pretty much independent of daily energy intake. For example, an otherwise healthy person beginning a ketogenic diet eaten to satiety usually starts out under-eating calories relative to daily energy needs, and thus loses weight.

For example, let’s say that a 5’6” woman starts out at 82 kg (180 lbs) and eats 1300 kcal per day (about a 1000 kcal/day deficit). If her target weight is 132 lbs. (60 kg.), her recommended daily protein intake would be 1.5 X 60 kg Reference Weight ** = 90 g/day, totaling 360 kcal.

** Reference Weight is used for calculations and does not represent total/ lean body weight. It is shown in the link below. Virta recommended we ignore the reference weight and use your height and gender to determine protein intake.

The insert, Daily Consumption of Protein-rich Foods in Ounces, indicates the number of ounces based on 1.5 g/kg of protein.

Daily consumption of protein-rich foods in ounces from kg..jpg

Expressed as a ‘macro’ of what’s on her plate, that’s 24% protein. But 6 months later when she weighed 63 kg (140 lbs) and is eating 2000 kcal per day at weight maintenance, that same protein dose (360 kcal out of 2000) represents a protein ‘macro’ of 16%.

The point is that in this situation where her weight is changing, her daily protein intake should be constant; whereas her ‘macros’ change as she transitions from weight loss to weight maintenance. This changing proportion of dietary protein to dietary energy as one proceeds through weight loss to weight maintenance is shown in Intake and Expenditure diagram below.

Please see the inserted chart:  Intake and Expenditure.

Intake and Expenditure. Changing proportion of dietary protein to dietary energy as one proceeds through weight loss to weight maintenance  copy.jpg

It is better to calculate one’s daily protein need in grams of dietary protein or ‘ounces’ of protein-containing food per day (In this example the ounces is 12 or 11 as in the Daily Consumption Of Protein-Rich Foods In Ounces Chart Above.)

A MODERATE PROTEIN KETOGENIC DIET as part of a well-formulated ketogenic diet allows circulating ketones to reach levels of at least 0.5 mM.  (For more information, click the link below.)

Too much dietary protein can drive down ketone production in the liver. Additionally, when consumed to excess, protein can upset gastro-intestinal function and place a stress on the kidneys to remove the additional nitrogen.

MINERAL CONSIDERATIONS:  Among the many factors that affect the body’s ability to build and maintain its lean body mass, maintaining an adequate balance of essential minerals is very important. Without enough of the potassium and magnesium tissues can’t be built up or even properly maintained. And because inadequate sodium intake causes increased potassium wasting by the kidneys, even salt intake can influence the efficiency with which dietary protein can be used.

In this context, it is also important to understand that our choice of dietary protein and how it is prepared can also influence our essential mineral status.  Four ounces of real chicken, fish, or meat typically contains more than twice the potassium and magnesium found in processed luncheon meats containing the same amount of protein.

CONCLUSIONS:

Achieving and maintaining a protein intake appropriate for a well-formulated ketogenic diet takes practice, and often considerable expert coaching. Individual needs and tolerances may vary, but in almost all cases they are found within the range of indicated in the Daily Consumption Of Protein-Rich Foods In Ounces Chart above. There is no reason to be concerned about long-term consumption of protein in the context of a well-formulated ketogenic diet in someone with normal kidney function.

This is a condensed version of the Virta post. Here is the link to that post https://blog.virtahealth.com/ Next select Science & Research for How Much Protein Do You Need In Nutritional Ketosis? By Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD Jeff Volek, PhD, RD, etc. al. on February 21, 2018

To learn more please read the book the Dr. Phinney co-authored with Dr. Volek.    New Atkins for a New You: The Ultimate Diet for Shedding Weight and Feeling Great Paperback – Mar 2 2010

 Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

Please consider visiting Lydia’s Blog https://2healthyhabits.wordpress.com

It will be the same posting that I email, but you can search the Blog using key words. In the Blog I discuss the Ketogenic and GAPS (for gut health) diets, supplements and Super-slow High Resistance Training.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before follow is available.

If you wish to contact me please use this form.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net

Nutritional Ketosis and Ketogenic Diet FAQ

Part 1-1

Nutritional ketosis is a natural metabolic state in which your body adapts to burning fat rather than carbohydrates as its primary fuel. It is clinically proven to directly reduce blood sugar (as measured by HbA1c), improve insulin sensitivity (as measured by HOMA-IR) and reduce inflammation (as measured by white blood cell count and CRP).

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

For the answers to these questions Written by Dr. Steve Phinney and the Virta Team, please copy and paste this link into your address bar https://blog.virtahealth.com/nutritional-ketosis-faq/

ALL ABOUT KETOSIS:

What is nutritional ketosis?

How do I get into nutritional ketosis?

How can I tell if I’m in nutritional ketosis?

What are ketones? What is ketogenesis?

What is keto-adaptation?

What does it mean to be fat adapted?

 KETOGENIC DIETS:

What is a ketogenic diet?

What can I eat on a ketogenic diet?

Why is sugar bad for you?

How many carbs can I eat on a ketogenic diet?

Should I count net carbs or total carbs?

Is a ketogenic diet healthy for everyone, not just people with diabetes or weight issues?

What is “keto flu” and how do I avoid it?

Should I take vitamins or supplements on a ketogenic diet?

How much sodium, potassium and magnesium should I have on a ketogenic diet?

How much protein should I eat on a ketogenic diet?

What are the best artificial sweeteners and sugar substitutes for a ketogenic diet?

Can I be vegetarian and still do nutritional ketosis?

Can I be vegan and still do nutritional ketosis?

Can I eat dairy on a ketogenic diet?

Can I eat gluten on a ketogenic diet?

Do I need to eat vegetables on a ketogenic diet?

Do I need fiber supplements on a ketogenic diet?

Can I eat whey protein on a ketogenic diet?

What can I eat at a Chinese restaurant on a ketogenic diet?

Can a ketogenic diet reverse type 2 diabetes?

KETOGENIC DIETS AND DIABETES:

Does a ketogenic diet reduce insulin resistance?

Can I reverse diabetic neuropathy, nephropathy, or retinopathy with a ketogenic diet?

Ketosis vs. Ketoacidosis: What’s the difference?

HEART HEALTH AND CHOLESTEROL:

Is a ketogenic diet safe for your heart?

What happens to your cholesterol on a ketogenic diet?

What happens to LDL cholesterol on a ketogenic diet?

What happens to triglyceride levels on a ketogenic diet?

Do statins decrease the production of ketones?

Is nutritional ketosis safe?

What is ketoacidosis?

Is it safe to increase salt intake on a ketogenic diet?

Is it safe to follow a ketogenic diet during pregnancy?

Is it safe to follow a ketogenic diet if you have no gallbladder?

Can I follow a ketogenic diet if I have no thyroid?

How does a ketogenic diet affect kidney stones?

Does a ketogenic diet increase your risk of gout?

Is fasting safe?

WEIGHT LOSS:

Does a ketogenic diet cause weight loss?

How do I break a weight loss plateau on a ketogenic diet?

Is dietary fat burned before stored fat on a ketogenic diet?

How can I lose belly fat on a ketogenic diet?

TROUBLESHOOTING A KETOGENIC DIET:

What causes muscle cramps on a ketogenic diet?

What do I do if I get diarrhea on a ketogenic diet?

How do I fix constipation on a ketogenic diet?

What causes keto rash and how do you fix it?

Why do ketone levels vary throughout the day?

What are the consequences of cheating or lapsing on a ketogenic diet?

How should I interpret and apply CGM data?

Fats and Oils:

Which fats and oils should I eat on a ketogenic diet?

Can I eat canola oil on a ketogenic diet?

What is the best ratio of MUFA, SFA and PUFA on a ketogenic diet?

Can I use olive oil as a cooking oil?

Is fat the most satiating macronutrient?

For the answers to these questions Written by Dr. Steve Phinney and the Virta Team, please copy and paste this link into your address bar https://blog.virtahealth.com/nutritional-ketosis-faq/ Have a question we haven’t answered? Email us your question at faq@virtahealth.com

To learn more please read the book the Dr. Phinney co-authored with Dr. Volek.    New Atkins for a New You: The Ultimate Diet for Shedding Weight and Feeling Great Paperback – Mar 2 2010

https://www.amazon.ca/New-Atkins-You-Ultimate-Shedding/dp/1439190275/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_t_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=32GFYZ6T1GBJA3TMR31G

Disclaimer: The content of this email or Post is not intended for the treatment or prevention of disease, nor as a substitute for medical treatment, nor as an alternative to medical advice. Use of recommendations is at the choice and risk of the reader.

If you are interested in following my postings, please click the Follow button to receive an email when the next posting is available. Hint: You may have to click the Accept and Close button before Follow is available.

As always, I am interested in your thoughts on these topics.

May you Live Long Healthy.

Yours truly,

Lydia Polstra

lpolstra@bell.net